Archive for the ‘High Mailing Priority’ Category

Playing the Field with Your Investments

 

Playing the Field with Your Investments

Courtesy of Wade of Investing Caffeine

For some, casually dating can be fun and exciting. The same goes for trading and speculating – the freedom to make free- wheeling, non-committal purchases can be exhilarating. Unfortunately the costs (fiscally and emotionally) of short-term dating/investing often outweigh the benefits.

Fortunately, in the investment world, you can get to know an investment pretty well through fundamental research that is widely available (e.g., 10Ks, 10Qs, press releases, analyst days, quarterly conference calls, management interviews, trade rags, research reports). Unlike dating, researching stocks can be very cheap, and you do not need to worry about being rejected.

Dating is important early in adulthood because we make many mistakes choosing whom we date, but in the process we learn from our misjudgments and discover the important qualities we value in relationships. The same goes for stocks. Nothing beats experience, and in my long investment career, I can honestly say I’ve dated/traded a lot of pigs and gained valuable lessons that have improved my investing capabilities. Now, however, I don’t just casually date my investments – I factor in a rigorous, disciplined process that requires a serious commitment. I no longer enter positions lightly.

One of my investment heroes, Peter Lynch, appropriately stated, “In stocks as in romance, ease of divorce is not a sound basis for commitment. If you’ve chosen wisely to begin with, you won’t want a divorce.”

Charles Ellis shared these thoughts on relationships with mutual funds:

“If you invest in mutual funds and make mutual funds investment changes in less than 10 years…you’re really just ‘dating.’ Investing in mutual funds should be marital – for richer, for poorer, and so on; mutual fund decisions should be entered into soberly and advisedly and for the truly long term.”

No relationship comes without wild swings, and stocks are no different. If you want to survive the volatile ups and downs of a relationship (or stock ownership), you better do your homework before blindly jumping into bed. The consequences can be punishing.

Buy and Hold is Dead…Unless Stocks Go Up

If you are serious…
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A Message From Generation Z: Thanks For Nothing

Courtesy of Lance Roberts via STA Wealth Management

This past weekend, I was reminded by my 9-year old son of the following passage in the Bible:

Out of the mouth of babies and infants, you have established strength because of your foes, to still the enemy and the avenger. - Psalm 8:2

That verse has been shortened over time to become the colloquialism, "Out of the mouths of babes."

On our drive to Bible study my son asked for my phone to play a new song he liked. (Note: This is also the reason traditional "terrestrial" radio stations are dying a slow painful death. If it ain't "on demand" – it's dead.) After a moment of scrolling on a music download app, the following words begin to stream through the cabin:

We are the ones, the ones you left behind.
Don't tell us how, tell us how to live our lives.
Ten million strong we're breaking all the rules.
Thank you for nothing, 'cause there's nothing left to lose.

I paused the song to ask my son if he understood the meaning of the lyrics. He replied simply – "no…but I like the song." 

The song opened up the ability for my son and I to have an important dialog about the future of "Generation Z" (those born after 1995) and the challenges that they will have to face. More importantly, the reasons why "Generation Z'ers," those "10 million strong," feel like they have been "left behind" by the generations before them.

The song had debuted very quietly in 2013 by a band called MKTO (Misfit Kids and Total Outcasts) which was founded by two friends Tony Oller (21) and Malcolm Kelly (20). According to an interview with with Celebuzz the duo stated:

We wanted to have a song that described our views of our generation, and to describe how we feel about being in the circumstances we are in, thanks to previous generations making mistakes.

However, it is not surprising that two twenty-somethings may be feeling the way they do. Let's take a look at some of the issues that they are growing up with.

Job Growth

As…
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China About To Make History – Again

Courtesy of John Rubino.

Any discussion of China has to open with the now-widely-understood fact that the numbers it reports are not to be trusted. Knowing this makes it easy to dismiss claims of high and consistently-on-target GDP growth, for instance, as a combination of government-directed borrowing and spending, and simple fabrication.

But how to handle negative numbers? When a serial fabricator admits that things are bad and getting worse, that would seem to imply that someone at or near the top has concluded that either the facts can no longer be obscured or that there’s an advantage in creating negative expectations.

Whatever the purpose, the most recent batch of stories is both strange and scary. For example:

China’s stock crash is spurring a shakeout in shadow banks

Peak insanity: Chinese brokers now selling margin loan backed securities

Here’s a pretty good summary of current trends from Reuters:

China under mounting pressure to ease policy as economy stumbles

China is under growing pressure to further stimulate its economy after disappointing data over the weekend showed another heavy fall in factory-gate prices and a surprise slump in exports.

Producer prices in July hit their lowest point since late 2009, during the aftermath of the global financial crisis, and have been sliding continuously for more than three years.

Exports tumbled 8.3 percent in the same month, their biggest fall in four months, as weaker global demand for Chinese goods and a strong yuan policy hurt manufacturers.

“Policy focus is definitely the (producer) deflation at this stage,” said Zhou Hao, economist at Commerzbank AG in Singapore.

He said China’s central bank would likely need to further cut interest rates again, having already cut four times since November in the most aggressive easing in nearly seven years.

The gloom may only deepen in the coming week with a raft of economic data forecast to show renewed weakness in factories, investment and domestic spending.

The world’s second-largest economy is officially targeted to grow at 7 percent this year, still strong by global standards, but some economists believe it is growing at a much slower pace.

Economists


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Oil ETFs Devour Cash As Retail Investors Try To Pick A Bottom

By Rupert Hargreaves at ValueWalk.

July was the worst month for oil prices since the financial crisis. The price of WTI crude plunged 21% during the month, the worse single-day decline since 2008. Unfortunately, July was also the month that saw record inflows from retail investors into ETFs that track the price of oil.

Last month investors poured $821 million into the United States Oil Fund ETF, which tracks the performance of WTI crude, according to ETF.com. That's not bad for a fund with $2.5 billion in assets.

Further, the VelocityShares 3X Long Crude Oil ETN (UWTI), a leveraged instrument that aims to provides three times the exposure to the swings in oil, saw inflows rise to $653 million — once again an enormous sum in comparison to the size of the fund. UWTI has $956 million in total assets.

Most of the UWTI's inflows came at the beginning of July. During the first week of the month, the fund reported inflows of around $400 million more than half the monthly total. Over the five weeks from the beginning of July to time of writing, the VelocityShares 3X Long Crude Oil ETN is down 63%. Over the same period, USO has fallen 27%. Both Oil ETFs are nearing an all-time low. Over the past twelve months, UWTI is down 96%, and USO is down 60%.

Crude Oil Oil ETFs

Oil ETFs

Oil ETF's: Retail fails to pick a bottom in oil

According to data from ETF.com, traders have been throwing money at these two exchange-traded instruments since the beginning of the year, without much success (as the figures above show). Since the start of the year, USO inflows have totaled $1.6 billion while those for UWTI have totaled $1.3 billion.

All the evidence points to the fact that most of the speculators plowing money into these funds don't have a clue.

Indeed, both USO and UWTI are designed to track the “daily” movement of oil and shouldn't be held for an extended period. USO has drastically underperformed the “spot price” of oil over the past five years thanks to the "roll costs" associated with tracking oil futures. When the oil market is in…
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Stephen Schork: The Commodity Crash Is “A Canary In The Coal Mine For The Global Economy”

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

The best thing about the commodity crash relapse taking place so quickly after the last swoon – recall that we have had two oil bear markets within 8 months – is that all those hollow chatterboxes and econo-tourists who swore that tumbling oil is "unambiguously good" and "great for the economy" (first and foremost Larry Kudlow and then proceeding with every single sellside strategist and economissed), have been laughed out of even CNBC's studio, and are nowhere to be found this time around because not only did all those promises of a surge in consumer spending never materialize (for reasons, or rather one reason which we explained extensively before), but the observent public still remembers all too well how countless 'experts' confusing cause (a gobal slowdown in the economy) with effect (crashing commodities).

Therefore, we were delighted when someone who actually understands the energy market for a change, The Schork Report's Stephen Schork, appeared on BBG's Pimm Fox yesterday to explain not only what the immediate future holds for both oil and gasoline prices, but why, when one actually gets cause and effect right, "this drop in oil prices, this drop industrial metal prices, this is not good. It's a canary in the coal mine that something is not right in the global economy, and that is a concern for us all."

The full interview is below, here are the key spot-on highlights, first about the futures of commodity prices :

… from a demand perspective on the seasonal front, it's August 7. We only have four more weeks left of summer driving, then the peak gasoline season is over. Then we head into the fall where the fall turnaround; that is the refinery maintenance season begins. So refineries will scale back in their crude oil purchases. So right now we are at the peak of the demand season. Demand is only going to fall between now and the end of the year.

On the supply side we are still producing. Regardless of what the oil bulls will tell you about the pullback in production, or the anticipated pullback in production, we have not yet seen it, and we will not see significant pullback I believe through the


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Taper Tantrum Coming? It Won’t Be Where Nearly Everyone Is Looking! The Next Tantrum

Courtesy of Mish.

Investors have been expecting another "Taper Tantrum" when the Fed starts hiking.

The term "Taper Tantrum" refers to the surge in US treasury yields (global government bond yields as well), in summer of 2013 when then-Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke put a spotlight on the wind down of Fed asset purchases (tapering off QE).

In February of 2014, the Wall Street Journal stated Last Year’s Taper Tantrum May Have Been Taste of the Future.

The Journal cited a research paper on Market Tantrums and Monetary Policy.

Stimulus No Free Lunch

"When investors infer that monetary policy will tighten, the instability seen in summer of 2013 is likely to reappear," warns the report.

"Stimulus now is not a free lunch, and it comes with a potential for macroeconomic disruptions when the policy is lifted," the paper said.

The paper’s authors are J.P. Morgan Chase economist Michael Feroli, University of Chicago professor Anil Kashyap, New York University’s Kermit Schoenholtz and Hyun Song Shin of Princeton University.

Hell of a Payback, But When?

I certainly agree that stimulus is no free lunch and there is going to be one hell of a payback for all this stimulus, but when and where?

2015 Repeat?

On May 14, 2015, MarketWatch asked Is This a Repeat of the 2013 Taper Tantrum?

Let's take a look at a couple charts from the article.

Pace in Rate Rise

That may appear ominous, but who's to say 2015 follows 2013?

Here is a chart of 10-year treasuries yields as of today.

US Treasury 10-Year Yield
 


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Europe’s Greek Tragedy

 

Outside the Box: Europe’s Greek Tragedy

By John Mauldin

In this week’s Outside the Box we have a unique diagnosis of Europe’s ills from … a medical doctor. The author is Dr. Luc De Keyser, who currently serves as the chief medical information officer at Xperthis, the largest provider of hospital information systems solutions in Belgium. He has done pioneering work in multicenter clinical trials, medical ontologies, paleonutrition, and examining human conflict from an evolutionary perspective.

Dr. De Keyser (writing for Stratfor) is not sanguine about Europe’s future. There are times, he reminds us, when a doctor has to make the tough call and conclude that the patient’s case is simply without hope. It's a painful diagnosis and not one that the doctor enjoys sharing with the patient. But at some point the patient must be told.

The fundamental obstacle to solving Europe’s problems, he asserts, is that Europe is simply too complex to fix in any straightforward or dependable way:

For such problems, there are no simple solutions. There aren't even complicated solutions. There are only best-guess measures with no guarantees of success. The currency union’s underlying flaws, like so many other modern problems, are far too intricate and perplexing for our minds and institutions to cope with. Failing to admit to our own overconfidence in dealing with the bloc’s problems will only perpetuate the crisis playing out across Europe.

Our poor human brains, the good doctor says, simply aren’t built to cope with a sociopolitical entity as big and complex as Europe. One thing we not-so-evolved apes like to do is interpret information in a way that confirms our preconceived notions. This is called confirmation bias, and in simpler times it kept us out of harm’s way by encouraging preferences for things we knew to be safe. This is a limitation that afflicts economists right along with the rest of us. And so we see, for example, Wolfgang Schäuble, finance minister of Germany, and Yanis Varofakis, former finance minister of Greece, obstinately pushing diametrically opposed economic programs. Which is OK, says Dr. De Keyser, until people on both sides start to claim that adherence to the other guy’s economic school of thought is going to ruin the livelihoods of


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Beijing may question the yuan peg as the Fed prepares for liftoff

Courtesy of Sober Look

Today's ISM non-manufacturing report showed US services sector expansion considerably stronger than economists had anticipated. The strength of services sector expansion however has diverged materially from what we see in US manufacturing.

Source: St. Louis Fed, ISM

The reason for the divergence is the strength of the US dollar, which on a trade-weighted basis is at the highest level in over a decade.

 

Source: St. Louis Fed

Strengthening US currency has generated a significant drag on growth in the manufacturing sector. We've all read the headlines.

But haven't we seen this divergence between the services and the manufacturing sectors elsewhere? Indeed just yesterday Markit published a similar chart for China.
 

Source: Markit


This of course is more than a coincidence. China's currency tie to the US dollar resulted in a similar dynamic of manufacturing sector significantly underperforming. Unlike the US however, China's manufacturing is more sensitive to exports, making the slowdown far more pronounced – resulting in an outright contraction (PMI below 50 in the chart above).

In recent months the yuan has been firmly pegged to the dollar. There are a number of reasons for this linkage, including China's wish to make the yuan part of the so-called Special Drawing Rights (SDRs), a basket of currencies constructed by the IMF and held by various central banks. Beijing reasoned that the yuan's stability would help them with that cause.
 

Source: barchart


However, yesterday we got this headline.
 

Source: Reuters


Time to give up the peg? There are of course other reasons China may want to maintain the link to the dollar – one of them is to continue "rebalancing" the economy.
 

Source: MRB


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The Pain Of Patience: How Excessive Short-Term Focus Hurts And Ways To Combat Our Tendencies

 

The Pain Of Patience: How Excessive Short-Term Focus Hurts And Ways To Combat Our Tendencies 

By Gregory D. Houser, Fund Evaluation Group. Originally published at ValueWalk.

"Despite the best of intentions, investors often fall short of their long-term goals due to excessive focus on the short term."

The U.S. equity markets have been on a tear. I am not referring to the short-term performance year-to-date, but the short-term performance of the past three years. U.S. equities, regardless of the index selected, returned approximately 20% annualized since June 2012. Despite double-digit returns from developed international equities over the same period, weakness in emerging markets and just about everything else has led many to question their holdings.1 Much like those investors that felt left out and wanted to jump on the tech-fund bandwagon during the late 1990s (we know how that ended), many investors have similar reactions to recent performance today and have considered abandoning diversification for an S&P 500 Index fund, if only for a minute. I would not be surprised if many of these investors also considered abandoning equities during the financial crisis, because these reactions are only natural, and no one is immune.

Short-Term Focus

Counter to the feelings of missing out on recent strong performance, 2008 and early 2009 was a stressful and painful time to be an investor. Daily equity market declines of four to five percent were almost commonplace. Declines of this magnitude created stress throughout the world, across the financial system, and in the gut of every investor.

Having experienced loss in our lives, we might recall the lack of appetite, difficulty sleeping, and anxiousness that comes during these times. Studies have indicated that our brain activity for financial loss is consistent with the primary negative outcome of pain. In other words, losses really do hurt.2 The type of stress experienced during the financial crisis triggered for many investors the natural fight-or-flight response and a desire to make the pain go away. The most significant challenge investors faced at the time was to ignore the short-term stressors and stay invested for the long term. Many investors were not up to the challenge. One can safely assume that the many equity sales at that time were heavily influenced by extreme investor stress and pain. When


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Fed Finally Figures Out Soaring Student Debt Is Reason For Exploding College Costs

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Back in May 2014, in one of its patented utterly worthless "analyses" (that cost taxpayers several tens of thousands of dollars) the San Francisco Fed, home of such titans of central planning thought as Janet Yellen, asked "is it still worth going to college." Not surprisingly, its answer was yes after some contrived mathematics that completely forgot to include just one thing: debt.

At the time, we had the following comment:

Oddly enough, having perused the paper several times, and having done
a word search for both "loan" and "debt" (both of which return no
hits), we find zero mention of one particular hockeystick. This one:

Perhaps for the San Fran Fed to be taken seriously one of these
years, it will actually do an analysis that covers all sides of a given
problem, instead of just the one it was goalseeked to "conclude" before
any "research" was even attempted.

An analysis, even a painfully simple one, such as the one we put together less than a month later:

It is common knowledge that in the hierarchy of bubbles, not even the stock market comes close to the student loan bubble. If it isn't, one glance at the chart below which shows the exponential surge in Federal student debt starting just after the great financial crisis, should put the problem in its context.

And while we have previously reported that a shocking amount of the loan proceeds are used to fund anything but tuition payments, a major portion of the funding does manage to find itself to its intended recipient: paying the college tuition bill.

Which means that with student debt being so easily accessible anyone can use (and abuse), it gives colleges ample room to hike tuition as much as they see fit: after all students are merely a pass-through vehicle (even if one which for the most part represents non-dischargeable "collateral") designed to get funding from point A, the Federal Government to point B, the college treasury account.

It should thus come as no surprise that in


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Zero Hedge

Crude Carnage & Asian Contagion Crushes Hype-Fueled Dreams Of US Stocks

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

A'twofer' today... The arrogant BTFDiness of Friday's talking heads...

And for everyone else worried about the "containment"...

So 3 big stories today - Equities collapsed... VIX ETFs turmoiled... and Crude Oil crashed...

But before we start - something odd is going on... Simply put - it is very clear now that stocks are moving in lockstep with JPY carry (China forced unwinds) and long-dated TSYs (China selling) have entirely decoupled from the rest of US assets...

We suspect that as Monday's collapse occurred last week it forced "Ris...



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Phil's Favorites

Weapons of Economic Misdirection

 

Thoughts from the Frontline: Weapons of Economic Misdirection

By John Mauldin

“Measurement theory shows that strong assumptions are required for certain statistics to provide meaningful information about reality. Measurement theory encourages people to think about the meaning of their data. It encourages critical assessment of the assumptions behind the analysis.

“In ‘pure’ science, we can form a better, more coherent, and objective picture of the world, based on the information measurement provides. The information allows us to create models of (parts of) the world and formulate laws and theorems. We must then determine (again) by measuring whether these models, hypotheses, theorems, and laws are a valid representation of the world.”

&ndas...



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All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: David is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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Market News

News You Can Use From Phil's Stock World

 

Financial Markets and Economy

Global markets are melting down (Business Insider)

Global markets are getting smoked again.

Dow futures are down 323 points, S&P 500 futures are down 40 points, and Nasdaq futures are down 93 points.

U.K. Stocks Fall as Investors Weigh Data Showing China Slowdown (Bloomberg)

U.K. stocks declined as investors considered further indications that the Chinese economy is slowing down.

Bwin.party Digital Entertainment Plc dropped 1.5 percent after its takeover battle took another twist with a revised&...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

Nikkei (Japan) topped last 5 times it was here, its back again!

Courtesy of Chris Kimble.

CLICK ON CHART TO ENLARGE

Could a price zone that started impacting the Nikkei 30-years ago still impact it again today? Well it looks like it is!

The Nikkei found the 21,000 level, line (1), to be support several times between 1987 and 1992. Once this support broke it then switched from a support to a resistance level.

As you can see several times from 1992 to 2000 the Nikkei ran into this resistance zone and failed to solidly break above it, leading to a top numerous times. The last time it hit this resistance zone was back in 2000. After failing to break above resistance then, it ...



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Chart School

RTT browsing latest..

Courtesy of Read the Ticker.

Please review a collection of WWW browsing results.



Date Found: Friday, 24 July 2015, 03:08:15 PM

Click for popup. Clear your browser cache if image is not showing.
Comment: The Guerrilla Economist on Greece, China, Petrodollar...http://youtu.be/31bYU7v0jbc



Date Found: Friday, 24 July 2015, 04:11:54 PM

Click for popup. Clear your browser cache if image is not showing.
Comment: For the first time since records began, hedge funds are net short gold futures, according to CFTC data...RTT: The smack down effect is minimal. The shake out has born little fruit, lower prices have created massive demand for physical, lower prices will destroy anti gold intent making gold ugly.


...

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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of August 31st, 2015

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Sabrient

Sector Detector: Finally, market capitulation gives bulls a real test of conviction, plus perhaps a buying opportunity

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

The dark veil around China is creating a little too much uncertainty for investors, with the usual fear mongers piling on and sending the vast buy-the-dip crowd running for the sidelines until the smoke clears. Furthermore, Sabrient’s fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings have been flashing near-term defensive signals. The end result is a long overdue capitulation event that has left no market segment unscathed in its mass carnage. The historically long technical consolidation finally came to the point of having to break one way or the other, and it decided to break hard to the downside, actually testing the lows from last ...



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ValueWalk

Some Hedge Funds "Hedged" During Stock Market Sell Off, Others Not As Risk Focused

By Mark Melin. Originally published at ValueWalk.

With the VIX index jumping 120 percent on a weekly basis, the most in its history, and with the index measuring volatility or "fear" up near 47 percent on the day, one might think professional investors might be concerned. While the sell off did surprise some, certain hedge fund managers have started to dip their toes in the water to buy stocks they have on their accumulation list, while other algorithmic strategies are actually prospering in this volatile but generally consistently trending market.

Stock market sell off surprises some while others were prepared and are hedged prospering

While so...



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Digital Currencies

Bitcoin Battered After "Governance Coup"

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Naysyers are warning that the recent plunge in Bitcoin prices - from almost $318 at its peak during the Greek crisis, to $221 yesterday - is due to growing power struggle over the future of the cryptocurrency that is dividing its lead developers. On Saturday, a rival version of the current software was released by two bitcoin big guns. As Reuters reports, Bitcoin XT would increase the block size to 8 megabytes enabling more transactions to be processed every second. Those who oppose Bitcoin XT say the bigger block size jeopardizes the vision of a decentralized payments system that bitcoin is built on with some believing ...



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Pharmboy

Baxter's Spinoff

Reminder: Pharmboy and Ilene are available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Baxter Int. (BAX) is splitting off its BioSciences division into a new company called Baxalta. Shares of Baxalta will be given as a tax-free dividend, in the ratio of one to one, to BAX holders on record on June 17, 2015. That means, if you want to receive the Baxalta dividend, you need to buy the stock this week (on or before June 12).

The Baxalta Spinoff

By Ilene with Trevor of Lowenthal Capital Partners and Paul Price

In its recent filing with the SEC, Baxter provides:

“This information statement is being ...



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Mapping The Market

An update on oil proxies

Courtesy of Jean-Luc Saillard

Back in December, I wrote a post on my blog where I compared the performances of various ETFs related to the oil industry. I was looking for the best possible proxy to match the moves of oil prices if you didn't want to play with futures. At the time, I concluded that for medium term trades, USO and the leveraged ETFs UCO and SCO were the most promising. Longer term, broader ETFs like OIH and XLE might make better investment if oil prices do recover to more profitable prices since ETF linked to futures like USO, UCO and SCO do suffer from decay. It also seemed that DIG and DUG could be promising if OIH could recover as it should with the price of oil, but that they don't make a good proxy for the price of oil itself. 

Since...



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Promotions

Watch the Phil Davis Special on Money Talk on BNN TV!

Kim Parlee interviews Phil on Money Talk. Be sure to watch the replays if you missed the show live on Wednesday night (it was recorded on Monday). As usual, Phil provides an excellent program packed with macro analysis, important lessons and trading ideas. ~ Ilene

 

The replay is now available on BNN's website. For the three part series, click on the links below. 

Part 1 is here (discussing the macro outlook for the markets) Part 2 is here. (discussing our main trading strategies) Part 3 is here. (reviewing our pick of th...

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Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

"Hello PSW Members –

This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743

Thank you for you time!




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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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