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Watch the Phil Davis Special on Money Talk on BNN TV!

Kim Parlee interviews Phil on Money Talk. Be sure to watch the replays if you missed the show live on Wednesday night (it was recorded on Monday). As usual, Phil provides an excellent program packed with macro analysis, important lessons and trading ideas. ~ Ilene

 

The replay is now available on BNN's website. For the three part series, click on the links below. 

Part 1 is here (discussing the macro outlook for the markets)  
Part 2 is here. (discussing our main trading strategies)
Part 3 is here. (reviewing our pick of the year with a brand new trade idea)
 




Watch Phil on Money Talk on BNN (where available)! Tonight at 7pm EST!

The replay will be available on their website after the showing tonight. I'll also post up a link to the replay as soon as it's available!


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Thomas Piketty, Paul Krugman and Joseph Stiglitz: The Genius of Economics

Watch: A 92/Y "7 Days of Genius" video program featuring Nobel laureates Paul Krugman and Joseph Stiglitz and French economist Thomas Piketty who discuss the "genius of economics" with MSNBC's moderator Alex Wagner. 

Thomas Piketty, Paul Krugman and Joseph Stiglitz: The Genius of Economics

 

Paul Krugman: “It seems safe to say that Capital in the Twenty-First Century, the magnum opus of the French economist Thomas Piketty, will be the most important economics book of the year—and maybe of the decade. Piketty, arguably the world’s leading expert on income and wealth inequality, does more than document the growing concentration of income in the hands of a small economic elite. He also makes a powerful case that we’re on the way back to ‘patrimonial capitalism,’ in which the commanding heights of the economy are dominated not just by wealth, but also by inherited wealth, in which birth matters more than effort and talent.” 

 





Why Amazon and Google are Losing the War

If you missed this earlier, be sure to watch Scott Galloway's presentation on the large global technology companies and the challenges facing them. Galloway discusses Amazon ("pure play commerce doesn't work"), its disruption by Uber, and Macy's, Facebook's bait-and-switch, Instragam ("the most powerful platform in the world"), the smartphone economy (outstanding for employment, terrible for wages), attracting better mates with an iPhone, Apple's successful move down the torso into luxury, and more. 

Galloway speaks fast so you may want to watch it twice.  

Why Amazon and Google are Losing the War

Courtesy of 

Professor Scott Galloway (NYU) delivers one of the most masterful 15 minutes worth of important tech trends I’ve ever seen. He’s got strong opinions about what’s to become of Amazon, Facebook, Google and Apple – and the charts to back these opinions up.

An amuse bouche: “Google Glass is not a wearable, it’s a prophylactic ensuring you will not concieve a child because no one will get near you.”

Thanks to my friend Ken S. for passing this on. Watch it or miss out on what’s really happening:

*****

Back to me: Watch also Winners/Losers in a Digital Age. In Winners/Losers, Galloway discusses general trends in the digital age, winners and losers in retail, social media and the broader society. He explores wealth inequality and the 0.01% (an "upward spiral downward"), the US tax code, education costs, the middle class, job shifts, the "ipad effect," the myth of progress, and a number of large tech and retail companies including AMZN (the "Tony Soprano of ecommerce"), TWTR, EL, TGT, and ("the first trillion dollar company") AAPL's brilliant move into the business of luxury. Apple is, without a doubt, winning the war. ~ Ilene

 





Shovelin’ Schmitt Against the Tide

Outside the Box: Shovelin’ Schmitt Against the Tide

By John Mauldin

There is an obsession in the marketplace over the date when the Fed will once again begin to raise rates. As if another 25 basis points is going to change the economics on tens of trillions of dollars of investments. But as we reflect on the issue more deeply, it becomes obvious that a minor bump in the fed funds rate will indeed change a great deal of economics all over the world.

No, it won’t do much to the cap rate on your latest real estate purchase, but it is likely to greatly affect the pricing of the currency and commodity markets. And those markets will affect corporate profits, which will affect the stock market. It’s all connected.

And what if the Fed has lost control? What if they are in a no-win situation where raising rates will cause reactions they don’t want, but not raising rates will result in equally unpleasant reactions?

A big part of the problem lies in what we analysts call divergent and convergent monetary policies. With Japan mounting an unprecedented quantitative easing attack on currencies everywhere and Europe getting ready to join in, with smaller nations all over the world lowering their interest rates, if the US were to raise rates, that move would strengthen the dollar even more. But that would mean even more deflation imported into the US.

Today we find that the headline CPI was -0.7% for January, coming on the heels of two previous months at -0.3%. The year-over-year rate slipped into negative numbers for the first time since October 2009, when we were still reeling from a deep recession.

The Fed typically raises rates when it wants to lean into inflation, not when inflation is falling. Yes, I know that Yellen in her testimony and in recent Fed releases has said the Fed is confident that inflation will once again rise to 2%. And that, even if you take out food and energy, inflation has still risen at 1.6% over the last 12 months.

I want to thank Joan McCullough for allowing me to use the essay she wrote yesterday morning, which is the single best description of the dilemma…
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Phil’s Stock World: The Magic of Compounding

Growing your wealth isn't just about making money in the stock market. In 2015, Philstockworld.com will focus on wealth-building techniques which, combined with our winning investing strategies, can help put you on the path to a life of financial independence.

 

 





Mamas, Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Pension Fund Managers

Thoughts from the Frontline: Mamas, Don’t Let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Pension Fund Managers

By John Mauldin

We do not have to look to Greece to find massively underfunded obligations. Here in the US we can find hundreds of examples, willingly created by politicians and businessmen who proclaim they are working for the public good. We call them pension funds, but they’re just another form of unfunded debt. A sovereign bond is a promise to pay a certain amount of money over time. A defined-benefit pension fund is a promise to pay a certain amount of income over time. The value of either is determined by the ability of the government or the pension fund (or its sponsor) to pay.

I am in the Cayman Islands as I write this letter, to speak at an alternative investment conference attended by the management of some of the largest pension funds in the US and Europe, both public and private. Being here has motivated me to write this week’s letter on the problems that pension funds face. The pension fund managers I have talked with take their fiduciary obligations seriously, and they face some serious challenges.

I was on the stage with Nouriel Roubini (who makes me come off as the optimist), and we were talking about macroeconomic risks. I was asked what other sorts of risks people should be thinking about, and I cited a recent report about how pension fund obligations had dramatically increased because of a small change in mortality tables.

There has been a very steady increase in life expectancy over the last almost 100 years. It is a fairly well-defined trend. The actuarial accountants whose responsibility it is to track these things updated the life expectancy tables for a 65-year-old male, who can now expect to live an additional 21.6 years, two years longer than in the old table.

This trend toward longevity is very well established and is likely to accelerate as new technologies and medicines become available, which means that underfunded pension plans are even more underfunded than we think. [See yesterday's post: How Silicon Valley is


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Weighing the Week Ahead: Time for “Risk On?”

Weighing the Week Ahead: Time for “Risk On?”

With a modest schedule of data releases, we can expect more analysis of last week’s news. Trading in several markets changed course rather abruptly. With traders poised to spot any change in trend, the question will be whether this shift is for real.

Is it finally time for “Risk On”?

Prior Theme Recap

In last week’s WTWA I predicted that the deluge of economic data would be closely examined for signs of weakness. Put another way, would the economic releases confirm the story of the markets in commodities and bonds? The question was a good one, and the answer was “no.” Friday’s employment report was the final element, changing the terms of the debate from deflation concerns to that old standby, worrying about the Fed.

Feel free to join in my exercise in thinking about the upcoming theme. We would all like to know the direction of the market in advance. Good luck with that! Second best is planning what to look for and how to react. That is the purpose of considering possible themes for the week ahead.

This Week’s Theme

The quirks of the calendar sometimes result in a quiet week following one crammed with data releases. Such is the case in the week ahead, but there is plenty of food for thought. Strength in oil, commodities, and stocks combined with weakness in bonds, utilities and even the dollar. It was the first 2015 sign of a change in market tone. Traders were asking: Is it time for “Risk On?”

Background

Over the last two months I have carefully raised and explored the “message” from various markets.

These themes all gave due respect to the approach of seeking a “message from the market.” This is a favorite for most traders and pundits, but it often serves to explain the past. Few seem to find predictive edge from this approach, although it sounds good on TV.


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Beware The Correction Of False Prices

Beware The Correction Of False Prices 

Courtesy of Charles Gave of Gavekal Dragonomics

I want to start this paper by reiterating a few of my strongly held convictions about the role of central bankers:

  • Economics is a branch of logic, itself a branch of philosophy, and not a branch of astrology (the good case) or mathematics (the bad case).
  • So when I see the guardians of the Temple of Mammon—otherwise known as central bankers—following an illogical policy, I am mesmerized. I start to have doubts, either about my ability to follow a path of logical reasoning, or about the sanity of the current breed of central bankers. As far as the first option goes, our readers can decide, and the market will be the ultimate judge. As for the second, allow me to make a few remarks…

Four basic postulates for central bankers

To think ‘logically’ one generally starts with a few postulates learnt from experience. What should these postulates be for central bankers?

  1. I expect central bankers to know that the future is unknowable. This has been generally accepted wisdom at least since the time of the New Testament: “But of that day and hour knoweth no man.”
  2. Since Karl Popper, central bankers should know that the amount of risk in a system is roughly constant over time and that any effort to minimize risk or volatility at any point in time (usually just before an election) will lead to its more forceful re-emergence later on (hopefully after the election). In this sense an economic system is much like one of Alexander Calder’s mobiles: if you restrict the motion of one of its branches, any disturbance of the system will lead to much bigger movements elsewhere.
  3. Since Knut Wicksell, central bankers should know that the greater the difference between the ‘natural’ interest rate and the ‘market’ rate, the bigger the subsequent booms and busts. If sustained, a false price for the cost of money increases the risk in a system exponentially. A false price for interest rates leads to a false price for the exchange rate. From there all prices become false and the economy moves ex-growth,


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The Cult of Central Banking

Outside the Box: The Cult of Central Banking

By John Mauldin

In today’s Outside the Box, good friend Ben Hunt informs us that we have entered the cult phase of the Golden Age of the Central Banker:

We pray for extraordinary monetary policy accommodation as a sign of our Central Bankers’ love, not because we think the policy will do much of anything to solve our real-world economic problems, but because their favor gives us confidence to stay in the market. I mean, does anyone really think that the problem with the Italian economy is that interest rates aren’t low enough? Gosh, if only ECB intervention could get the Italian 10-yr bond down to 1.75% from the current 1.85%, why then we’d be off to the races! Really? But God forbid that Mario Draghi doesn’t (finally) put his money where his mouth is and announce a trillion euro sovereign debt purchase plan. That would be a disaster, says Mr. Market. Why? Not because the absence of a debt purchase plan would be terrible for the real economy. That’s not a big deal one way or another. It would be a disaster because it would mean that the Central Bank gods are no longer responding to our prayers.

But, he points out, the cult phase of any human society is a stable phase in the sense that, while change may happen, it will not happen from within:

There is such an unwavering faith in Central Bank control over market outcomes, such a universal assumption of god-like omnipotence within this realm, that any internal market shock is going to be willed away.

However, there is a minor catch: external market risk factors are all screaming red.

I’ve been doing this for a long time, and I can’t remember a time when there was such a gulf between the environmental or exogenous risks to the market and the internal or behavioral dynamics of the market. The market today is Wile E. Coyote wearing his latest purchase from the Acme Company – a miraculous bat-wing costume that prevents the usual plunge into the canyon below by sheer dint of will.



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Zero Hedge

How Money Creation Threatens Hyperinflation

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by Patrick Barron via Mises Canada,

In order to understand the relationship between money creation and the price level, we first need to get some definitions straight.

To Austrians the terms inflation and deflation refer to money and not prices. There is no doubt that money has experienced unprecedented inflation. In February of 2010 base money was $2.1 trillion. Four years later it was $3.8 trillion. In the same time frame, M1 has increased from $1.7 trillion to $2.9 trillion. M2 has gone from $8.5 trillion to $11.7 trillion. Excess reserves have doubled from $1.2 trilli...



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Chart School

Small Caps pressuring 'Bull Trap'

Courtesy of Declan.

The Dow had the best of the action, with higher volume buying to close the day out. The index closed above the 20-day and 50-day MAs. The next challenge is to push above 18,100; which is the 'bull trap' and the recent spike push to 18,205.


The S&P didn't quite enjoy the same relative gain as the Dow, and today's volume was lighter than yesterday. However, it did manage a close above 20-day and 50-day MA.


The Nasdaq also pushed higher volume accumulation. It's probably still a ...

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Phil's Favorites

Ben Bernanke, Confused as Ever, Starts His Own Blog to Prove It

Ben Bernanke, Confused as Ever, Starts His Own Blog to Prove It

Courtesy of Mish.

Ben Bernanke just started his own blog at the Brookings Institute. His first post, from today, Inaugurating a New Blog is the announcement.

Let's dive into Bernanke's second post of the day: Why are Interest Rates So Low?

Bernanke: Low interest rates are not a short-term aberration, but part of a long-term trend. As the figure below shows, ten-year government bon...



more from Ilene

All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: David is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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Digital Currencies

Federal Agents Investigating Bitcoin Money Laundering Stole Over $1 Million In Bitcoin

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

This is one of those sad times when The Onion realizes it has badly, and permanently, missed its IPO window.

Just released from the Department of Justice

Former Federal Agents Charged With Bitcoin Money Laundering and Wire Fraud

Agents Were Part of Baltimore’s Silk Road Task Force

Two former federal agents have been charged with wire fraud, money laundering and related offenses for stealing digital currency during their investigation of the Silk Road, an underground black market that al...



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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of March 30th, 2015

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Promotions

Watch the Phil Davis Special on Money Talk on BNN TV!

Kim Parlee interviews Phil on Money Talk. Be sure to watch the replays if you missed the show live on Wednesday night (it was recorded on Monday). As usual, Phil provides an excellent program packed with macro analysis, important lessons and trading ideas. ~ Ilene

 

The replay is now available on BNN's website. For the three part series, click on the links below. 

Part 1 is here (discussing the macro outlook for the markets) Part 2 is here. (discussing our main trading strategies) Part 3 is here. (reviewing our pick of th...

more from Promotions

Sabrient

Sector Detector: Bulls retake the wheel, with a little help from their friends at the Fed

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Scott Martindale at Sabrient Systems

Well, it didn’t take long for the bulls to jump on their buying opportunity, with a little help from the bulls’ friend in the Fed. In fact, despite huge daily swings in the market averages driven by daily news regarding timing of interest rate hikes, the strength in the dollar, and oil prices, trading actually has been quite rational, honoring technical formations and support levels and dutifully selling overbought conditions and buying when oversold. Yes, the tried and true investing clichés continue to work -- “Don’t fight the Fed,” and “The trend is your friend.”

In this weekly update, I give my view of the cur...



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Market Shadows

Kimble Charts: South Korea's EWY

Kimble Charts: South Korea's EWY

By Ilene 

Chris Kimble likes the iShares MSCI South Korea Capped (EWY), but only if it breaks out of a pennant pattern. This South Korean equities ETF has underperformed the S&P 500 by 60% since 2011.

You're probably familiar with its largest holding, Samsung Electronics Co Ltd, and at least several other represented companies such as Hyundai Motor Co and Kia Motors Corp.

...



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Option Review

Cypress Semi Draws Bullish Option Plays

Bullish trades abound in Cypress Semiconductor options today, most notably a massive bull call spread initiated in the July expiry contracts. One strategist appears to have purchased 30,000 of the Jul 16.0 strike calls at a premium of $0.89 each and sold the same number of Jul 19.0 strike calls at a premium of $0.22 apiece. Net premium paid to put on the spread amounts to $0.67 per contract, thus establishing a breakeven share price of $16.67 on the trade. Cypress shares reached a 52-week high of $16.25 back on Friday, March 13th, and would need to rally 4.6% over the current level to exceed the breakeven point of $16.25. The spread generates maximum potential profits of $2.33 per contract in the event that CY shares surge more than 20% in the next four months to reach $19.00 by July expiration. Shar...



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Pharmboy

2015 - Biotech Fever

Reminder: Pharmboy is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

PSW Members - well, what a year for biotechs!   The Biotech Index (IBB) is up a whopping 40%, beating the S&P hands down!  The healthcare sector has had a number of high flying IPOs, and beat the Tech Sector in total nubmer of IPOs in the past 12 months.  What could go wrong?

Phil has given his Secret Santa Inflation Hedges for 2015, and since I have been trying to keep my head above water between work, PSW, and baseball with my boys...it is time that something is put together for PSW on biotechs in 2015.

Cancer and fibrosis remain two of the hottest areas for VC backed biotechs to invest their monies.  A number of companies have gone IPO which have drugs/technologies that fight cancer, includin...



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Stock World Weekly

Stock World Weekly

Newsletter writers are available to chat with Members regarding topics presented in SWW, comments are found below each post.

Here's this week's Stock World Weekly.

Click here and sign in with your user name and password. 

 

...

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Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

"Hello PSW Members –

This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743

Thank you for you time!




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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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