Archive for the ‘Immediately available to public’ Category

Why it matters when big tech firms extend their power into media content

 

Why it matters when big tech firms extend their power into media content

Courtesy of David Hesmondhalgh, University of Leeds

File 20171114 26460 1sx4asd.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1

Shutterstock

A major shift is taking place in global media. Until recently, tech corporations were mainly involved in distribution rather than production. But now, instead of simply delivering TV shows, music and films onto our devices and screens, major firms are sinking huge amounts of money into the content itself.

The herald of this change was Netflix. Here was a tech company from the heart of Silicon Valley which in 2011 began to commission expensive middlebrow fare for its video streaming service. Amazon soon followed, and now Apple are poaching star TV executives, investing a billion dollars a year in production, and almost certainly planning a new video streaming site. Google and Facebook are developing content strategies, too.

However, this shift is not, as some would have it, a case of boring old “legacy” media companies giving way to smart, dynamic usurpers that will give the world better television.

It is better understood as a wholesale media power grab by the tech sector.

Taking over? Jesse33/Shutterstock

Blurred boundaries

There is a precedent for media being dominated by a bigger, neighbouring sector. In the 20th century, many key developments in media and culture were driven by electronics corporations. The recording and radio industries were essentially created in order to provide content to play on electronics devices – where initially the biggest profits lay.

Once content itself became sufficiently lucrative, electronics firms established themselves in production and distribution, forming the heart of vast media oligopolies. Key US broadcasting network NBC was an offshoot of General Electric, big record companies were often subsidiaries of electronics giants, and later, Japanese electronics group Sony became a massive media force.

Boundaries have blurred, but the electronics and tech sectors remain distinct, with their own cultures and industry bodies. And the new tech oligopoly has even more power than the electronics corporations and media giants.

It is important to…
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The two obstacles that are holding back Alzheimer’s research

Reminder: Pharmboy and Ilene are available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

The two obstacles that are holding back Alzheimer's research

Courtesy of Todd GoldeUniversity of Florida

File 20171115 19772 2rishs.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1

Family members often become primary caregivers for loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease. tonkid/Shutterstock.com

Thirty years ago, scientists began to unlock the mysteries regarding the cause of Alzheimer’s disease. This knowledge ushered in an era of great enthusiasm that scientists could develop new therapies to either prevent Alzheimer’s or significantly slow the symptoms once present.

Despite continued progress and renewed hope that some therapies now in human trials will modify the course of the disease, the initial optimism of neuroscientists like me has been significantly tempered by reality. Numerous therapies, most with sound scientific basis, have been tested and shown to be ineffective in humans with symptomatic Alzheimer’s disease.

Like the war on cancer, the war on Alzheimer’s disease is not going to be won in a single glorious “battle.” Instead, I believe incremental yet transformative progress will eventually lead to success. Unlike cancer, the scientific community does not yet have any “survivor stories” to buoy our efforts, and it will take a concerted effort by scientists, pharmaceutical companies, government and society to bring about the reality of ending Alzheimer’s disease. Only by recognizing and confronting all of the obstacles impeding development of Alzheimer’s therapies can we be confident that our battle will be successful.

As a physician-scientist and director of the University of Florida’s McKnight Brain Institute who began studying Alzheimer’s disease in medical school in the late 1980s, I appreciate the scope of the scientific advances we have collectively made. I have also come to the sobering realization that translating these advances into real therapies that will make a difference for patients suffering from this devastating disease is an incredibly complex issue which is not all about the science.

There are two significant, nonscientific obstacles – a shortage of funding and patent law – that will require concerted effort by scientists, concerned citizens, society and our lawmakers to overcome.

Funding is improving, but still lagging

Governments of industrialized nations have recognized research funding for…
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Back-To-Back Hindenburg Omens

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

About a week ago, we warned about the infamous bearish stock market pattern developing in US equities coined by some as the ‘Hindenburg Omen’. The pattern is known for its bearish tendencies developed after the Hindenburg disaster of 1937. The key understanding is breadth deterioration, when more stocks hit 52-week lows than 52-highs. Since the warning, a liquidity gap has developed in stocks thwarting any attempt at new all time highs.

Fast forward to this morning and a very ironic situation has unfolded in the skies 50-miles north of London. And no – it’s not a giant penis drawn by US-Navy pilots in F-18s – it’s a true ‘Hindenburg Omen’ as the world’s longest airship crashed early this morning. The £25m airship called ‘Airlander 10’ appeared to “break in two,” a witness told the BBC. Reports suggest the airship broke free from mooring less than 24-hours after a successful test. At the time, no-one was on board of the aircraft, but Bedfordshire police, paramedics and fire crews were alerted and treated a women who suffered minor injuries.

According to the Guardian,

The roads around the airfield were closed amid concerns that aviation fuel and helium could escape from the airship. However, police said they believed the helium would soon dissipate.

Hybrid Air Vehicles (HAV), the company that developed the airship confirmed there had been an incident. It said the craft was not on a flight at the time and had since been deflated.

An investigation has been launched to find out what happened.

Local residents took to social media and snapped shocking pictures of the crashed airship appearing to be more deflated than Tom Brady’s footballs.

#Airlander has died ????anyone know what happened? pic.twitter.com/0kYdWKHRkr

— Mark Jefferies (@airdisplays) November 18, 2017

Another concerned resident indicated ground crews rushed to slice open the aircraft to release helium after the crash.

Nobody's laughing as #Airlander blows over and techs rush to cut it open to release helium. pic.twitter.com/pxYdG5igvN


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Who’s Next? Venezuela’s Collapse Puts These Nations At Risk

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

"It's a wake-up call for a lot of people who will say ‘Look, the stuff I own is actually very risky'…" warns Ray Jian, who oversees about $6 billion at Pioneer Investment Management Ltd. in London. "People have been ignoring risks in places like Lebanon for a long time," and the official default of Venezuela this week has emerging-market money managers are looking to identify countries that might run into trouble down the road.

While Bloomberg reports that while none are nearly as badly off as Venezuelawhere a combination of low oil prices, economic mismanagement and U.S. sanctions did the country intraders are scouting for credit risk, from Lebanon, where Prime Minister Saad Hariri’s sudden resignation has once again thrust the nation into a Saudi-Iran proxy war, to Ecuador, where recently elected President Lenin Moreno continues to expand the debt load in a country with a history as a serial defaulter.

1. Lebanon:

One of the world’s most indebted countries, Lebanon may hit a debt-to-gross domestic product ratio of 152 percent this year, according to International Monetary Fund forecasts. That’s coming at a time when political tension is rising. Hariri’s abrupt resignation, announced from Riyadh on Nov. 4, triggered about $800 million of withdrawals from the country as investors speculated that the nation would be in the crosshairs of a regional feud between the Saudis and Iranians. While the central bank says the worst may be over, credit-default swaps have hit a nine-year high.

2. Ecuador:

After a borrowing spree, the Andean nation’s external debt obligations over the next 12 months ballooned to a nine-year high relative to the size of its GDP. Ecuador probably has the highest default risk after Venezuela, according to Robert Koenigsberger, the chief investment officer of Gramercy Funds Management. The country will be vulnerable “when the liquidity environment changes and they can no longer go to the market to get $2.5 billion to plug the hole," he said. Finance Minister Carlos de la


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The blockchain does not eliminate the need for trust

 

The blockchain does not eliminate the need for trust

Courtesy of Dirk BaurUniversity of Western Australia and Niels Van QuaquebekeKühne Logistics University

File 20171114 27632 1np371k.jpg?ixlib=rb 1.1

Central authorities are still important to create legitimacy in a cryptocurrency. Shutterstock

A common idea about the blockchain, the technology that powers Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, is that it can “create trust”, or allow two parties to make a transaction “without relying on trust”.

If true, this means we could create a world without a trusted “man in the middle”. We could have financial services without a bank verifying transactions and we could transfer ownership (of a house, for instance) without a lawyer. But this idea is wrong.

The blockchain does not create or eliminate trust. It merely converts trust from one form to another. While we previously had to trust financial institutions to verify transactions, with the blockchain we have to trust the technology itself.

It is also not clear that a blockchain-powered currency (such as Bitcoin) can go mainstream without the backing of a trusted authority. In fact there are hardly any examples of money (including gold) that have ever worked without the backing of a central authority or a sovereign.

When you make a traditional money transfer the bank will first verify that you have sufficient cash, and then debit your account and credit the recipient. Think of the blockchain as a decentralised version of this process. Rather than all of this information being held and verified by the bank, it is done on an “open public ledger”.

When someone transfers a Bitcoin, it is verified by “miners” (really powerful computers), then encrypted, and a “block” is added to the ledger.

Because all of the verification is done by the system itself, the idea is that users do not need a trusted central authority. Instead, trust is transferred from one central authority (such as a bank) to many decentralised, anonymous participants (the miners).

But here lies the problem – users must trust the technology and the governance of the system.

What is trust?

In economic exchanges there are three
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The Coming Economic Downturn In Canada

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Authored by Deb Shaw via MarketsNow.com,

  • Canadian GDP growth has outperformed this year, helping the Canadian dollar
  • As GDP growth slows and the Bank of Canada turns neutral, catalysts turning negative
  • Crude oil and real estate look set for a downturn, with negative implications for the currency

Given its natural resource-based economy, Canada is a boom and bust kind of place. This year, the country has enjoyed a significant boom. Thanks to a government stimulus program, rising corporate capital expenditures and consumer spending, Canada’s GDP growth has been nothing short of spectacular in 2017. According to Statistics Canada, the latest reading for year-over-year GDP growth is a healthy 3.5% (as of August 2017). While this is stronger than all major developed countries, growth is decelerating from its most recent peak in May 2017 (when GDP growth was an astounding 4.7%). A visual overview of historical GDP growth is shown below for reference:

Turning a corner: Canadian growth comes back down to earth

11-17-2017 CAD GDP growth

Source: Statistics Canada

Following the crude oil bust in the second quarter of 2014, Canadian growth rates cratered. While the country avoided a technical recession, the economic outlook was poor until early 2016. After crude oil returned to a bull market in the first quarter of 2016, the fortunes of the country turned. Given limited growth in 2015, the economy had no problem delivering 2%+ year-over-year growth rates in 2016. As a substantial stimulus program ramped up government spending in 2017, growth rates have continued to accelerate this year.

Storm clouds on the horizon: crude oil and real estate

While Canada has delivered exceptional growth in the last two years, the future outlook is much more challenging. Beyond the issue of base effects (mathematically, year-over-year GDP growth will be much tougher next year), key sectors including the oil & gas industry and Canadian real estate look ripe for a downturn.

Crude bull market intact today, but at risk in 2018

As WTI crude strengthens beyond $55, crude oil is clearly in a bull market today. Looking at figures from the International Energy Agency, global demand


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“We’re Not Stupid” – Top US Nuclear Commander Would Disobey “Illegal” Trump Orders

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

A few short months after Admiral Scott Swift, Commander of the US Navy’s Pacific Fleet, said he would obey a hypothetical order to launch a nuclear strike against China if the president chose to give it, Air Force Gen. John Hyten – America's top nuclear commander – said Saturday he would push back against President Trump if the president ordered a nuclear launch the general believed to be "illegal."

When an audience member asked Hyten, who was speaking at a national security conference in Halifax Canada, about the hypothetical scenario, he responded by assuring his interlocutor that military commanders “aren’t stupid.”

Here's CBS:

Air Force Gen. John Hyten, commander of the U.S. Strategic Command (STRATCOM), told an audience at the Halifax International Security Forum in Halifax, Nova Scotia, on Saturday that he has given a lot of thought to what he would say if Mr. Trump ordered a strike he considered unlawful.

"I think some people think we're stupid," Hyten said in response to a question about such a scenario. "We're not stupid people. We think about these things a lot. When you have this responsibility, how do you not think about it?"

Hyten explained the process that would follow such a command. As head of STRATCOM, Hyten is responsible for overseeing the U.S. nuclear arsenal.

"I provide advice to the president, he will tell me what to do," Hyten added. "And if it's illegal, guess what's going to happen? I'm going to say, 'Mr. President, that's illegal.' And guess what he's going to do? He's going to say, 'What would be legal?' And we'll come up with options, with a mix of capabilities to respond to whatever the situation is, and that's the way it works. It's not that complicated."

Hyten said he has been trained every year for decades in the law of armed conflict, which takes into account specific factors to determine legality – necessity, distinction, proportionality, unnecessary suffering and more. Running through scenarios of how to react in the event of an illegal order is standard practice, he said.

And Hyten is not the only one who’s been thinking about how they might react to a hypothetical order


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The Junkie Market, i.e., Lots Of Highs & Lows, Is Back

Courtesy of Dana Lyons

The past few days have seen a reversal from substantial net New lows to substantial net New highs – a condition that has preceded poor performance in the past.

We’ve posted several pieces in the past regarding what we’ve termed “Junkie Markets” – junctures characterized by a substantial number of both New 52-Week Highs and New 52-Week Lows.

Such conditions represent a key component of various and notorious market warning signals, such as the Hindenburg Omen and others. As the ominous sounding names would imply, the historical stock market performance following such signals has been poor. We have found the same to be true with respect to our “Junkie Markets”. Today’s Chart Of The Day deals with a new variation of the Junkie Market.

Specifically, we have seen an unusual development over the past 2 days. On Wednesday, the number of net New Lows on the NYSE, i.e., New Lows minus New Highs, exceeded 2% of all exchange issues, a fairly large amount. The very next day, yesterday, conditions completely reversed as we saw net New NYSE Highs, i.e. New Highs minus New Lows, actually account for more than 2% of all issues. If you think that sounds strange, you’re correct. It is just the 15th such occurrence since the start of our data in 1970.

image

Here are the dates of these reversals:

  • 3/25/1970
  • 4/14/1972
  • 7/11/1974
  • 10/20/1977
  • 1/2/2001
  • 4/22/2004
  • 5/11/2004
  • 4/18/2006
  • 6/28/2007
  • 7/19/2007
  • 9/19/2008
  • 5/30/2013
  • 10/10/2013
  • 1/15/2015
  • 11/16/2017

What would cause such a phenomenon? Well, the only thing we can offer is that a Junkie Market, i.e., one with lots of New Highs and Lows, is really the only type of market in which such a reversal is even possible. Thus, it should not be surprising that the S&P 500’s aggregate performance going forward following these precedents has been less than stellar (incidentally, aggregate performance is similar following the 19 occasions of the opposite reversals, i.e., >2% Net New Highs to >2% Net New Lows).

image

With median returns negative from


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The ‘Junkie’ Market Is Back

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Via Dana Lyons' Tumblr,

The past few days have seen a reversal from substantial net New lows to substantial net New highs – a condition that has preceded poor performance in the past.

We’ve posted several pieces in the past regarding what we’ve termed “Junkie Markets” – junctures characterized by a substantial number of both New 52-Week Highs and New 52-Week Lows.

Such conditions represent a key component of various and notorious market warning signals, such as the Hindenburg Omen and others. As the ominous sounding names would imply, the historical stock market performance following such signals has been poor. We have found the same to be true with respect to our “Junkie Markets”. Today’s Chart Of The Day deals with a new variation of the Junkie Market.

Specifically, we have seen an unusual development over the past 2 days. On Wednesday, the number of net New Lows on the NYSE, i.e., New Lows minus New Highs, exceeded 2% of all exchange issues, a fairly large amount. The very next day, yesterday, conditions completely reversed as we saw net New NYSE Highs, i.e. New Highs minus New Lows, actually account for more than 2% of all issues. If you think that sounds strange, you’re correct. It is just the 15th such occurrence since the start of our data in 1970.

image

Here are the dates of these reversals:

3/25/1970

4/14/1972

7/11/1974

10/20/1977

1/2/2001

4/22/2004

5/11/2004

4/18/2006

6/28/2007

7/19/2007

9/19/2008

5/30/2013

10/10/2013

1/15/2015

11/16/2017

What would cause such a phenomenon? Well, the only thing we can offer is that a Junkie Market, i.e., one with lots of New Highs and Lows, is really the only type of market in which such a reversal is even possible. Thus, it should not be surprising that the S&P 500’s aggregate performance going forward following these precedents has been less than stellar (incidentally, aggregate performance is similar following the 19 occasions of the opposite reversals, i.e., >2% Net New Highs to >2% Net New Lows).

image

With median


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NYC Subway Managers Receive $300,000 Salaries While MTA Cuts Mechanics

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

During a  long-ranging investigation, The New York Times interviewed more than 300 people and poured over thousands of documents to sketch out the history of neglect, abuse and mismanagement that fostered the New York City subway's current state of crisis in what's probably the most comprehensive explanation of the woes plaguing the MTA.

Century-old tunnels and track routes are crubling, but the Times found that the MTA’s budget for subway maintenance has barely grown, in inflation adjusted terms, since 1992.

Signal problems and equipment failures are occurring twice as frequently as they did a decade ago – a sign of just how rapidly the transit system is deteriorating.

What’s worse, is that hundreds of mechanic positions have been cut even as the century-old system groaned under the damage caused by Superstorm Sandy. Meanwhile, compensation for managers has ballooned to nearly $300,000 a year.

Daily ridership has doubled in the past decade to 5.7 million people. Yet, New York City is the only city in the world with fewer miles of track than it had during World War II.

Given the unconscionable state of neglect paid to its budget, it should come as no surprise that New York City’s subway system has the worst performance of any major urban transportation system in the world. Only 65% of weekday trains make it to their destination on time.

The Times claims that the deplorable state of the city’s transit system is the result of negligence by both Republican and Democratic politicians, including former Gov. George Pataki, former mayor Rudolph Giuliani, as well as Mayor Bill De Blasio and Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

Over the past two decades, politicians have diverted a whopping $1.5 billion in tax revenue from the MTA to other political priorities. Politicians are also largely responsible for pressing the agency to spend money on opulent station makeovers, like the new Fulton Street station, that do little to improve service. Politicians also locked the MTA into an unfavorable agreement with creditors that secured a needed short-term cash infusion but left it saddled with $5 billion in interest payments.

Perhaps most egregiously, Gov. Cuomo recently forced the MTA to send $5 million to three


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Phil's Favorites

Why it matters when big tech firms extend their power into media content

 

Why it matters when big tech firms extend their power into media content

Courtesy of David HesmondhalghUniversity of Leeds

Shutterstock

A major shift is taking place in global media. Until recently, tech corporations were mainly involved in distribution rather than production. But now, instead of simply delivering TV shows, music and films onto our devices and screens, major firms are sinking huge amounts of money into the content itself.

The herald of this change was Netflix. Here was a tech company ...



more from Ilene

Biotech

The two obstacles that are holding back Alzheimer's research

Reminder: Pharmboy and Ilene are available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

The two obstacles that are holding back Alzheimer's research

Courtesy of Todd GoldeUniversity of Florida

Family members often become primary caregivers for loved ones with Alzheimer’s disease. tonkid/Shutterstock.com

Thirty years ago, scientists began to unlock the mysteries regarding the cause of Alzheimer’...



more from Biotech

Zero Hedge

Back-To-Back Hindenburg Omens

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

About a week ago, we warned about the infamous bearish stock market pattern developing in US equities coined by some as the ‘Hindenburg Omen’. The pattern is known for its bearish tendencies developed after the Hindenburg disaster of 1937. The key understanding is breadth deterioration, when more stocks hit 52-week lows than 52-highs. Since the warning, a liquidity gap has developed in stocks thwarting any attempt at new all time highs.

...



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Digital Currencies

The blockchain does not eliminate the need for trust

 

The blockchain does not eliminate the need for trust

Courtesy of Dirk BaurUniversity of Western Australia and Niels Van QuaquebekeKühne Logistics University

Central authorities are still important to create legitimacy in a cryptocurrency. Shutterstock

A common idea about the blockchain, the technology that powers Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, is that it can “...



more from Bitcoin

Chart School

When does this all end - Update2

Courtesy of Read the Ticker.

To buy or not to buy: The US 10 year versus high yielding utility stocks.

Previous Post: When does this all end - Update

The US 10 year yield is at 2.34%

And compared to utility dividend stocks ...

American Water Works (Dow Jones Utility: AWK) dividend @ 1.87%
NI Source (Dow Jones Utility: NI) dividend @ 2.58%
American Electric Power (Dow Jones Utility: AEP) dividend @ 3.25%

The question is, which asset class do you trust to provide a return for 10 years? Of course your ability to judge future inflation expectations (see TIP for iShares TIPS Bond ETF) and how extende...

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Insider Scoop

10 Stocks To Watch For November 17, 2017

Courtesy of Benzinga.

Related AMAT 8 Stock's Moving In Thursday's After-Hours Session 12 Stocks To Watch For November 16, 2017 ...

http://www.insidercow.com/ more from Insider

ValueWalk

Robert Mugabe Under House Arrest, Military Takes Control Of Zimbabwe

By Andjela Radmilac. Originally published at ValueWalk.

Zimbabwe’s head of state, 93-year-old Robert Mugabe, has been placed under house arrest after what seems to be a military coup took place in the nation’s capital.

By U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jesse B. Awalt/Released [Public domain], via Wikimedia CommonsRobert Mugabe is safe

Following numerous reports on social media late Thursday night about the increased military presence in Harare, the capital of Zimbabwe, the country’s military took...



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Members' Corner

An Interview with David Brin

Our guest David Brin is an astrophysicist, technology consultant, and best-selling author who speaks, writes, and advises on a range of topics including national defense, creativity, and space exploration. He is also a well-known and influential futurist (one of four “World's Best Futurists,” according to The Urban Developer), and it is his ideas on the future, specifically the future of civilization, that I hope to learn about here.   

Ilene: David, you base many of your predictions of the future on a theory of historica...



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Mapping The Market

Puts things in perspective

Courtesy of Jean-Luc

Puts things in perspective:

The circles don't look to be to scale much!

...

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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of September 11th, 2017

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Promotions

NewsWare: Watch Today's Webinar!

 

We have a great guest at today's webinar!

Bill Olsen from NewsWare will be giving us a fun and lively demonstration of the advantages that real-time news provides. NewsWare is a market intelligence tool for news. In today's data driven markets, it is truly beneficial to have a tool that delivers access to the professional sources where you can obtain the facts in real time.

Join our webinar, free, it's open to all. 

Just click here at 1 pm est and join in!

[For more information on NewsWare, click here. For a list of prices: NewsWar...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

Brazil; Waterfall in prices starting? Impact U.S.?

Courtesy of Chris Kimble.

Below looks at the Brazil ETF (EWZ) over the last decade. The rally over the past year has it facing a critical level, from a Power of the Pattern perspective.

CLICK ON CHART TO ENLARGE

EWZ is facing dual resistance at (1), while in a 9-year down trend of lower highs and lower lows. The counter trend rally over the past 17-months has it testing key falling resistance. Did the counter trend reflation rally just end at dual resistance???

If EWZ b...



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All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: Harlan is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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