Archive for the ‘Topic’ Category

News You Can Use From Phil’s Stock World

 

Financial Markets and Economy

SEC May Regret the Day It Allowed Leveraged ETFs (Bloomberg)

That bit of truism is all you need to understand the rapid rise in leveraged exchange-traded funds, which were created in 2006 as a way for investors to double their exposure to stock indices.

Trump's Big Problems: Anemic Private Investment and Weak Productivity (Forbes)

Why was the Great Depression so deep, and why did it drag on for so long? According to impressive research by Robert Higgs of the Independent Institute, it was because President Roosevelt abandoned his campaign promises of 1932: to cut federal spending, to balance the budget, to maintain a sound currency, and to rein in Washington’s bureaucracy. Instead, Roosevelt switched gears.

Williams Says Three, Maybe More 2017 Fed Hikes Make Sense (Bloomberg)

Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco President John Williams said that three or “maybe even more” interest-rate increases this year make sense, depending on how the central bank is doing on its employment and inflation objectives.

Trump and automakers have criticized Obama’s fuel standards as expensive job killers. A new study disagrees. (The Washington Post)

Federal fuel economy standards may be easier and less expensive to comply with than previously projected, according to a new study. The finding could undermine the argument by automakers and the Trump administration that the fuel standards increase costs and would lead to prohibitively expensive vehicles and job losses.

ECB's Free Money Has Helped Banks More Than It Aids the Economy (Bloomberg)

When the European Central Bank announced its targeted lending program back in 2014, policy makers including President Mario Draghi held out great hopes that it would finally get financial institutions extending credit to companies and households again.

Renters Now Rule Half of U.S. Cities (Bloomberg)

Just 49 percent of Motor City households were homeowners in 2015, down from 55 percent in 2009 and the lowest percentage in more than 50 years. Detroit isn’t alone, of course: The rate of U.S. home ownership fell steadily for a decade as the foreclosure crisis turned millions of owners into renters and tight housing markets made it hard for renters to buy homes. 

Venezuela's Fuel Shortage Is
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Art of the Deal – Trump Tells G.O.P. to Fall in Line or Be Stuck With Obamacare: Why Bother?

Courtesy of Mish.

I expected another round of fruitless failure where appeasing the “Freedom Caucus” would be at the expense of moderates.

Instead, Trump Tells G.O.P. to Fall in Line or Be Stuck With Obamacare.

President Trump issued an ultimatum on Thursday to recalcitrant Republicans to fall in line behind a broad health insurance overhaul or see their opportunity to repeal the Affordable Care Act vanish, demanding a Friday vote on a bill that appeared to lack a majority to pass.

As House leaders struggled to negotiate with holdouts in the hopes of rescheduling the vote, Mr. Trump sent senior officials to the Capitol with a blunt message: He would agree to no additional changes, and Republicans must either support the bill or resign themselves to leaving President Barack Obama’s signature domestic achievement in place.

“Guys, we’ve got one shot here,” he [Trump] told members of the Freedom Caucus at a meeting in the Cabinet Room, according to a person present in the room who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the meeting was private. “This is it — we’re voting now.”

A new estimate of the bill’s cost and its impact on health coverage further soured the picture for wavering lawmakers. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office on Thursday issued a report on the revised version of the health care bill showing that it would cost more than the original version but would not cover more people.

Recent changes to the bill, made through a series of amendments introduced on Monday, would cut its deficit savings in half. Instead of reducing the deficit by $337 billion, the new version of the bill would save only $150 billion over the decade.

Democrats say that the purpose of insurance is to share risk, and that without federal requirements, insurers would once again offer bare-bones policies. Before the Affordable Care Act took effect, maternity coverage was frequently offered as an optional benefit, or rider, for a hefty additional premium.

On the Ball Tweets

Surreal https://t.co/Z5CoP2CJXH pic.twitter.com/L7FoONAqeW

— Brendan Nyhan (@BrendanNyhan) March 24, 2017

Trump, via OMB Director Mulvaney, tells House GOP either they pass the AHCA tomorrow or Obamacare will stay in place https://t.co/0GgnrqIlWP

— Bob


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Brexit Blackmail Irony: EU Threatens UK with Queues and Shortages

Courtesy of Mish.

THE key obstacle to a reasonable Brexit negotiation is Michel Barnier, the EU’s Brexit negotiator.

Barnier still insists on a role for the European Court of Justice, a non-starter for UK prime minister Theresa May. Barnier also insists on an exit bill and “principles” before trade agreements start. Principles include agreement on rights of migrant, social welfare, taxes, environmental and consumer protection standards. Good luck with that.

To top it off, the EU now demands fishing rights to UK waters in return for nothing.

Queues and Shortages

Please consider Barnier warns UK of queues and shortages if Brexit talks fail.

In a wide-ranging speech ahead of Article 50 exit talks, Michel Barnier warned Britain it must agree “principles for an orderly withdrawal” before trade talks, including its financial dues and the rights of 4m UK and EU migrants.

Brushing aside one of Mrs. May’s red lines over the future role of European judges, Mr. Barnier explicitly stated the EU’s demand that interim measures “will be within the framework of European law” and the European Court of Justice. Such a transition could not allow Britain to pick and chose access to areas of the single market.

In one of the most provocative parts of his address, Mr. Barnier tackled head-on Mrs. May’s assertion that “no deal is better than a bad deal”, setting out a bleak vision of the “serious consequences” from leaving without agreement.

“More than 4m British citizens in the EU and European citizens in the UK faced with complete uncertainty about their rights and their future; the reintroduction of binding customs controls, which will inevitably slow down trade and lead to queues of trucks at Dover; serious disruption to air traffic; an overnight suspension in the movement of nuclear materials to the UK,” he said.

Fishing Rights

Also consider EU Fishing Fleet Urges Post-Brexit Access to UK Seas.

Fishing groups from nine EU countries have demanded continued access to UK waters after Brexit and warned that UK fish supplies could otherwise lose tariff-free access to the continent.

EU countries rely heavily on access to UK seas, with some vessels catching up to 80 percent of their fish there. Some UK fishing groups and politicians have demanded that Britain remove foreign vessels after Brexit to improve catches for UK fishermen.


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QOTD: The WSJ Unloads on “Fake President”

 

QOTD: The WSJ Unloads on “Fake President”

Courtesy of 

If President Trump announces that North Korea launched a missile that landed within 100 miles of Hawaii, would most Americans believe him? Would the rest of the world? We’re not sure, which speaks to the damage that Mr. Trump is doing to his Presidency with his seemingly endless stream of exaggerations, evidence-free accusations, implausible denials and other falsehoods.

A President’s Credibility (The Wall Street Journal)

Did Rupert Murdoch order the code red? This is tough stuff from the right-leaning editorial board of the Wall Street Journal. And it’s important that it be said by someone on the right, quite frankly. Nothing penetrates the mental force field between the two ends of the spectrum these days.

Bottom line: You can be the President of the United States or you can tweet bullshit from Fox & Friends or Alex Jones.

But you can’t do both.





Obamacare Replacement Postponed: New “Final Offer” Coming

Courtesy of Mish.

The Obamacare replacement vote has been postponed. There are conflicting reports on when a vote will next take place.

House Majority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy told CNN that House debate on the bill will start Friday morning. But a White House spokeswoman said debate will begin on Thursday night and Republicans expect to have the votes to pass it on Friday.

The postponement is a sobering setback for Republicans, who aimed to approve health-care legislation before moving to other parts of their agenda, particularly tax reform. The GOP had timed Thursday’s now-aborted vote to the seventh anniversary of the passage of the ACA, popularly known as Obamacare.

President met with the House Freedom Caucus for two straight days, aiming to convince the conservative group to vote to pass the plan. Members of the caucus have opposed the current replacement proposal, saying it does not go far enough to repeal Obamacare.

A Freedom Caucus source told CNBC there is “no way” a bill will pass on Friday.

The White House gave the House Freedom Caucus what one lawmaker called a “final offer” Thursday in its effort to win enough votes for the legislation. After the delay, Freedom Caucus Chairman Rep. Mark Meadows told reporters “We have not gotten enough of our members to get to ‘yes’” but added that “progress is being made.”

“I am still a ‘no’ at this time, I’m desperately trying to get to ‘yes’ … with all of the Freedom Caucus, they’re really trying to get to ‘yes,’” the North Carolina Republican said. He added that he expects the GOP needs “another 30 or 40 votes” to pass the bill.

Scheduling Change

The latest spin from the White House is the delay is nothing more than a scheduling change so reporters don’t have to meet at 3:00 Friday for the vote.

A scheduling change? Really? When you are 30 to 40 votes short? This was all too predictable.

The “vote will get crushed” item was up to the individual to decide, but 30 votes short would qualify in my estimation.

Only six readers opted for that result. And that makes sense.

In retrospect, It was really a choice between “The vote will barely pass” and “The vote won’t happen”.

On Friday we get a new


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Valeant: The End Of The Michael Pearson Era

Courtesy of Roddy Boyd of The Southern Investigative Reporting Foundation

Valeant Pharmaceuticals International, the corporate poster-child for price-gouging, tax-inversion and hedge-fund manager wealth destruction quietly severed all ties with J. Michael Pearson, its former chief executive officer and longtime guiding light, in January according to its annual proxy statement filed this morning.

While Pearson stepped down from Valeant in May 2016, and struck a wide-ranging separation agreement that paid him $83,333 per month for consulting–especially the much-touted and at least temporarily disastrous Walgreens contract–his primary job was to cooperate with the seemingly eternally expanding roster of civil and criminal investigations.

The deal with Pearson was supposed to last through this December and the use of the word “initial” in the contract’s wording was a suggestion it might be renewed. Valeant, in the Proxy, says it last paid him in October, and in December its board of directors determined no more payments would be made: “In December 2016, the Board determined that we are not in a position to make any further payments to Mr. Pearson, including in connection with his then-outstanding equity awards with respect to 3,053,014 shares.”

Pearson’s agreement was terminated in January, for unspecified reasons.

Assuming that Valeant’s language isn’t implying that the company simply doesn’t have the cash available to pay Pearson, then a legitimate question becomes whether he did anything to violate the terms of his agreement through non-cooperation. Given that it paid him $1 million annually with full-benefits, allowing him to have an office, an assistant and legal fees paid for, this doesn’t seem to be in his best interests.

Also of note is the timing of the cessation of payments to Pearson in October given that charges against Philidor Rx Services were filed on November 17. While it is highly unlikely that Valeant’s board would have a sense of when–or even if–additional charges might be brought, their own counsel was assuredly aware that federal prosecutors have a long-standing practice of refusing to negotiate settlements with companies where they are actively pursuing indictments against current leadership.

(Southern Investigative Reporting Foundation readers will recall our investigative work from October 2015 that began an ongoing re-examination of the company’s ethics and business practices that has forced its share price to $10.86 in recent trading, down from over $257 in July, 2015.)

A call to Scott Hirsch, Valeant’s Communications chief, seeking comment was not returned.





Obamacare Repeal Vote May Be Delayed, Won’t Pass Senate: Trump Makes “Final Offer”

Courtesy of Mish.

It’s much harder to get votes to do something when the votes actually matter. After scheduling a vote on Obamacare for today, GOP lawmakers now say ObamaCare Repeal Vote May Be Delayed.

The House may delay its vote on the GOP’s ObamaCare replacement plan until Friday or next week, several lawmakers said.

“It didn’t look like today was going to be when we’re going to vote,” said Rep. Phil Roe (R-Tenn.) after leaving a meeting with committee chairs and House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), who controls the House floor schedule.

The vote on the healthcare bill was originally planned for Thursday, the seven-year anniversary of the day ObamaCare was signed into law.

As of 1:30 p.m., GOP leaders had not made a final decision about whether to delay the vote until Friday or next week.

They were still assessing negotiations that took place Thursday between President Trump and the far-right House Freedom Caucus at the White House. After the meeting, members of the caucus said they had not reached a deal with President Trump to win their support.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer said he still expects the bill to come up for a vote Thursday.

“That would obviously be up to Speaker [Paul] Ryan and [House Majority] Leader [Kevin] McCarthy, but nothing leads me to believe that’s the case,” Spicer said when asked if the vote would be pushed back.

Vote is Moot

The vote is moot because Trump’s Obamacare Repeal Concessions Likely Can’t Pass Senate.

President Donald Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan are considering throwing red meat at the right to push their Obamacare repeal bill through the House. But senators from both parties are signaling those conservative goodies will have a hard time surviving the Senate.

Democrats say they are certain they can kill any language in the repeal bill that erases Obamacare’s mandate for minimum benefits in insurance plans. And top Republicans are making no promise that the last-ditch changes to win over conservatives will fly in the more centrist Senate, which is beginning to write its own health care plan that’s likely to look far different from what the House is set to vote on Thursday night.

Parliamentary rules could be the bigger problem. The budget reconciliation procedure being used by Senate


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OPEC Out Of Moves As Goldman Sachs Expects Another Oil Glut In 2018

 

OPEC Out Of Moves As Goldman Sachs Expects Another Oil Glut In 2018

By Nick Cunningham, OilPrice.com

Oil prices are heading down again on swelling U.S. crude oil inventories, with Brent dropping below $50 per barrel for the first time this year.

The OPEC deal that has taken more than 1 million barrels per day of oil off the market has not succeeded in reversing this bearish trend for inventories. And with the deal at its midway point, focus is shifting towards an extension of the cuts through the end of the year.

But OPEC’s usual strategy of jawboning the market back up ahead of these negotiations seems to be wearing thin amid record high crude oil inventories. "OPEC has used up most of its arsenal of verbal weapons to support the market. One hundred percent compliance by all is the only tool they have left and on that account they are struggling," said Ole Hansen, head of commodity strategy at Saxo Bank.

"OPEC's market intervention has not yet resulted in significant visible inventory drawdowns, and the financial markets have lost patience," investment bank Jefferies said in a research note.

Although projections from Wall Street banks tend to vary quite a bit, there is a growing chorus warning about another slide in crude prices. At this point, the big variable is whether or not OPEC decides to extend the deal when it meets in May – an extension would likely stabilize prices and might even push them back up into the mid-$50s or higher. No extension and oil could fall much further into the $40s.Related: The Oil Market Is At A Major Turning Point

Looking out a bit further, things get much more complicated. Even if the supply/demand imbalance is taking a long time to correct itself, rising demand and tepid supply growth suggest that the glut will ease over time. At least that is the general consensus.

However, Goldman Sachs warns that another downturn could come over the next three years, sparked by a new wave of supply stemming from megaprojects planned years ago. These projects cost billions of dollars and take many years to bring online, and many of them were initiated back when oil prices…
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Wild Swings in New Home Sales: Median Price Declines, Average Price Up

Courtesy of Mish.

New home sales shot up 6.1% in February aided by 39% jump in the midwest but a 21.4% decline in the Northeast.

Sales came in just a bit below the top Econoday estimate.

New home sales shot 6.1 percent higher in February to a 592,000 annualized rate that easily beats the Econoday consensus for 565,000 and is near the top estimate of 600,000. Sales appeared to have gotten a boost from builder concessions as the median price fell a monthly 3.9 percent to $296,200 for a year-on-year rate that’s suddenly in the negative column at minus 4.9 percent.

Strength is centered in the Midwest where the sales rate surged 21,000 to 89,000 and easily surpassing 11,000 gains for the both the West, at 157,000, and the South at 313,000. Sales in the Northeast fell sharply in yesterday’s existing home sales report and are down 9,000 to a very low 33,000 annualized rate in today’s report.

Supply of new homes did rise slightly in the month, up 4,000 to 266,000 currently on the market, but relative to sales supply fell to 5.4 months from 5.6 months. Supply has been thin all cycle for new homes and was at 5.5 months in February last year.

Most of the news is good in this report underscored by the average price which, reflecting high-end properties, jumped 9.9 percent in the month for a yearly 11.7 percent gain at $390,400 and a new record. Today’s report helps offset weakness in existing home sales and keeps the housing sector on a moderately climbing slope.

New Home Sales Jump Second Month

Mortgage News Daily reports New Home Sales Build on January Strength.

New home sales posted a much better February than did existing home sales and, in fact, better than most analysts had expected.

It was the second consecutive month of strength for the indicator which had see-sawed between positive and negative results in the waning months of 2016.

On a non-seasonally adjusted basis, there were 49,000 new homes sold in February compared to 41,000 in January. Thirty-six-thousand of the homes sold were in the $200,000 to 299,000 price tier.

The median price of a new home sold in February was 296,200 compared to $311,300 a year earlier. The average price was $390,400 compared to $349,400.

There were


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Why Big Insurance Adores the American Health Care Act

 

Why Big Insurance Adores the American Health Care Act

Courtesy of 

This post first appeared on BillMoyers.com.

There's been a lot of talk about just who was hurt and helped by Obamacare and who will profit or be imperiled by the next phase of health care legislation. Yet health insurance executives have been curiously silent about the House GOP plan to repeal and replace Obamacare. While the American Medical Association and the American Hospital Association, among many others, have come out against it, insurers have clearly made a strategic decision not to show their hand.

But know this: They love it. Their fingerprints are all over what the Republicans are calling the American Health Care Act. Arguably the only thing they don’t like about House Speaker Paul Ryan’s Ayn Randish creation is the way the plan would slash funding for the Medicaid program. That’s not because insurance executives are more compassionate for the poor than they’ve been in the past; it’s because a growing percentage of their profits now comes from Medicaid. In fact, more than half of the big insurers’ revenues is now coming from the government, not the private sector. And they’re fine with that.

Make no mistake, health insurance lobbyists also helped shape the Affordable Care Act. Most notably, they were able to get a provision stripped from the bill that would have created a government-run insurance plan (the “public option”) to compete with private insurers. But they didn’t get everything they wanted.

It gets rid of those pesky new rules on consumer protection

Over insurers’ objections, the ACA was enacted with important consumer protections. Thanks to the ACA, insurers can no longer charge older people more than three times as much as younger people for the same policy, and they can’t allocate more than 20 percent of what we pay in premiums to profits and administrative activities like sales and marketing. It’s also now illegal for insurers to deny people coverage because of a pre-existing condition. And policies sold now must cover several “essential benefits,” a provision that outlawed junk insurance.

Now that the insurance executives have…
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Phil's Favorites

News You Can Use From Phil's Stock World

 

Financial Markets and Economy

SEC May Regret the Day It Allowed Leveraged ETFs (Bloomberg)

That bit of truism is all you need to understand the rapid rise in leveraged exchange-traded funds, which were created in 2006 as a way for investors to double their exposure to stock indices.

Trump's Big Problems: Anemic Private Investment and Weak Productivity (Forbes)

Why was the Great Depression so deep, and why did it drag on for so long? According to impressive research by Robert Higgs of the Independent Institute, it was because President Roose...



more from Ilene

Market News

News You Can Use From Phil's Stock World

 

Financial Markets and Economy

SEC May Regret the Day It Allowed Leveraged ETFs (Bloomberg)

That bit of truism is all you need to understand the rapid rise in leveraged exchange-traded funds, which were created in 2006 as a way for investors to double their exposure to stock indices.

Trump's Big Problems: Anemic Private Investment and Weak Productivity (Forbes)

Why was the Great Depression so deep, and why did it drag on for so long? According to impressive research by Robert Higgs of the Independent Institute, it was because President Roose...



more from Paul

ValueWalk

Past Empires That Can Tell Us About The Future In Four Maps

By Mauldin Economics. Originally published at ValueWalk.

Studying history has little practical utility in averting past outcomes. We are doomed to repeat history whether we know it or not.

The value in knowing history is not that one might prevent its recurrence. Its value is that it allows you to identify those things that don’t change and that shape events… no matter the year on the calendar.

That’s why I want to show you four maps that highlight what parts of the world looked like in the past… and that point the way toward what may come in the future.

China 

The map below simplifies a great deal of China’s ancient and imperial history. It shows seven states that fought for control of the historic Chinese heartland during the Warring States period (475–221 BC).

...



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Zero Hedge

China's Largest Dairy Operator Suddenly Crashes 90% To Record Low, Muddy Waters Says "Worth Close To Zero"

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

In December 2016, Muddy Waters' Carson Block said China's largest dairy farm operator, Hong-Kong listed China Huishan Dairy Holdings Co., is "worth close to zero" and questioned its profitability in a report. Today, with no catalyst, it suddenly almost is. The stock collapsed over 90% in minutes to a record low.

The sudden crash wiped out about $4.2 billion in market value in the stock, which is a member of the MSCI China Index.

...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

Gold Bugs; Stellar performance stage set again

Courtesy of Chris Kimble.

From 2001 to 2011, would you have rather owned the S&P 500 or Gold Miners (Gold Bugs Index/HUI)? If you answered the Gold Bugs index, you would be correct. The left chart below compares the performance of the Gold Bugs Index and the S&P 500. From 2001 to 2011, the Gold Bugs index out performed the S&P 500 by 1,400% (left chart below).

Since 2011, miners have been weaker than the S&P 500 by a large percent. Could the stage be for another period where the mining stocks are going to be stronger than the broad markets again?

...

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Chart School

Semiconductors Recover at 20-day MA

Courtesy of Declan.

Yesterday's selling didn't follow through with additional losses, instead, indices dug in at lows and managed to recover some of yesterday's selloff.  The best recovery came from the Semiconductor Index. It gained over 1% as it bounced off its 20-day MA. However, it wasn't enough to stop a 'sell' trigger in the MACD and CCI.


Next is the Nasdaq 100. It staged a recovery, but not from a typical support level. Unfortunately, it has a MACD trigger 'sell' from early March and a new 'sell' trigger between the -DI an...

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Members' Corner

Natterings

Check out some new posts from our friend The Nattering Naybob. 

The Big Lebowski Sequel?

Taking a "resp-shit" or "potty break" from "in the Toilet Thursday" or "Thursday's in the Loo"... One of our favorite scenes from the 1998 cult classic The Big Lebowski, the ash can scene where Walter Subchak (John Goodman) eulogizes the departed Donnie (Steve Buscemi) with Jeffrey Lebowski (Jeff Bridges) looking on.

Keep reading: ...



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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of March 20th, 2017

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Digital Currencies

Bitcoin Tumbles Below Gold As China Tightens Regulations

Courtesy of Zero Hedge

Having rebounded rapidly from the ETF-decision disappointment, Bitcoin suffered another major setback overnight as Chinese regulators are circulating new guidelines that, if enacted, would require exchanges to verify the identity of clients and adhere to banking regulations.

A New York startup called Chainalysis estimated that roughly $2 billion of bitcoin moved out of China in 2016.

As The Wall Street Journal reports, the move to regulate bitcoin exchanges brings assurance that Chinese authorities will tolerate some level of trading, after months of uncertainty. A draft of the guidelines also indicates th...



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Mapping The Market

Congress begins rolling back Obama's broadband privacy rules

Courtesy of Jean Luc

I am trying to remember who on this board said that people wanted to Trump because they want their freedom back. Well….

Congress begins rolling back Obama's broadband privacy rules

By Daniel Cooper, Endgadget

ISPs will soon be able to sell your most private data without your consent.

As expected, Republicans in Congress have begun the process of rolling back the FCC's broadband privacy rules which prevent excessive surveillance. Arizona Republican Jeff Flake introduced a resolution to scrub the rules, using Congress' powers to invalidate recently-approved federal regulations. Reuters reports that the move has broad support, with 34 other names throwing their weight behind the res...



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Promotions

Free eBook - "My Top Strategies for 2017"

 

 

Here's a free ebook for you to check out! 

Phil has a chapter in a newly-released eBook that we think you’ll enjoy.

In My Top Strategies for 2017, Phil's chapter is Secret Santa’s Inflation Hedges for 2017.

This chapter isn’t about risk or leverage. Phil present a few smart, practical ideas you can use as a hedge against inflation as well as hedging strategies designed to assist you in staying ahead of the markets.

Some other great content in this free eBook includes:

 

·       How 2017 Will Affect Oil, the US Dollar and the European Union

...

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Biotech

The Medicines Company: Insider Buying

Reminder: Pharmboy and Ilene are available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

I'm seeing huge insider buying in the biotech company The Medicines Company (MDCO). The price has already moved up around 7%, but these buys are significant, in the millions of dollars range. ~ Ilene

 

 

 

Insider transaction table and buying vs. selling graphic above from insidercow.com.

Chart below from Yahoo.com

...

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All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: Harlan is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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FeedTheBull - Top Stock market and Finance Sites



About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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