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Poster Children

Poster Children

Courtesy of 

grimace

IBM, Coca-Cola and McDonalds are three of America’s largest corporations and most well-known brands. They are true multinationals in every sense of the word and they dominate their industries both at home and abroad. They are numbers 23, 58 and 106 on the Fortune 500 list, respectively. Together, they make up 12 percent of the Dow Jones Industrial Average’s total weighting.

And all three are plagued by the same problem – they’re shrinking. More than this, their shrinkage is finally being recognized on The Street, now that investors are peeling back all of the layers of buyback and dividend subterfuge that’ve kept this fact disguised for so many years.

McDonalds has been trading like a bond for the last two years, oscillating within a tight ten-point range between 90 and 100 dollars a share, a 3-and-change percent dividend along with a buyback keeping it afloat almost regardless of how poorly its margins and same store sales have come in. Not anymore. This morning it told Wall Street that earnings in the last quarter are down by an unbelievable 30 percent. No more bond-like status for Mickey D – and indeed, the stock looks to trade below the $90 level for the first time since January of 2013. As McDonalds raises prices on fancier offerings, they run into new competitors at the higher tier. As they fight to maintain their economically absurd “Dollar Menu”, they collapse their own margins. It’s not unfixable, but it’s a bad situation. On top of that, all of the marketing in the world cannot change the fact that the current McDonalds product and experience is socially unacceptable to what used to be the company’s core audience. I don’t know anyone who would feed their kids that stuff or bring a greasy sack of it up to their office these days.

Coca-Cola’s core business, diet and regular soda, is dead. Everyone knows it except for shareholders, who’ve kept the stock near 52-week highs regardless of the massive shift in consumer tastes away from sugars, preservatives, artificial ingredients and unhealthy soft drinks. They’ve been shareholder-friendly on management incentives, dividends and buybacks as well – but it may not be enough anymore. Coca-Cola is not growing and


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What Do You and the Energizer Bunny Have in Common?

TransTech Digest: What Do You and the Energizer Bunny Have in Common?

By Patrick Cox

While it would be a stretch to say that you run on lithium, you may stand to benefit greatly from it. Human biochemistry is one of the most complicated systems in existence. Certainly, it’s the most studied of complicated systems. As the tools available to biotechnologists increase in power exponentially, the pace of discovery in all the biological sciences is increasing dramatically. The science of nutrition is no exception. In fact, it appears to be one of the biggest and earliest beneficiaries.

The term bioinformatics refers to the application of computer technologies such as advanced correlation analysis to biological data. In conjunction with increasingly sophisticated databank software, the ability to collect more accurate and meaningful data has also improved due to the falling cost of high-tech biotech tools. One field that is experiencing major transformations due to bioinformatics is the science of nutrition. As scientists turn their investigative attention to our diets, we’re often very surprised to learn which chemicals are beneficial and which are detrimental.

Over the past decade, it’s become increasingly clear that lithium has various neuroprotective abilities, meaning that it helps preserve the health and function of the electrically activated neurons of our nervous systems. Neurons differ from most cells in that they do not replicate via cell division, or mitosis. Instead, they can increase through a process called neurogenesis that involves the neural stem cells and progenitor cells. At one time, it was believed that adults couldn’t grow additional neurons, but recent discoveries, including the mitochondrial breakthroughs I’ve written about here, have shown this not to be true. Nevertheless, the health and function of our neurons is of critical importance because these critically important cells give us our power to think and sense.

Lithium, a metal so light that bars of the element float in water, is found in varying concentrations in soils. People ingest lithium either directly through drinking water or indirectly by way of plant foods that absorb local water.

Another possible way to consume lithium is by smoking tobacco that has high lithium content. Let me be very clear that I’m not recommending that you smoke anything. In fact, I’m recommending…
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McDonald’s Vows Fresh Thinking After Net Income Declines 30%; Mish Offers Some Advice

Courtesy of Mish.

A 30% net income decline for McDonald's is quite startling to most. I wonder why such a decline took so long.

In response to that pathetic performance, McDonald’s Vows Fresh Thinking.

McDonald’s Corp. outlined plans for what it called fundamental changes to its business as it reported one of its worst quarterly profit declines in years, driven by problems in nearly every major part of its business.

The 30% decline in net income for the period ended Sept. 30 was the latest in a string of disappointing results for the world’s largest restaurant chain. It is struggling with weak sales in Asia, Europe and, most important, its home market in the U.S.

In the U.S., an increasingly complicated menu has slowed service and McDonald’s once reliable base of younger customers have defected to fast-casual chains boasting customized ordering and fresh ingredients, including Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc., and specialty-burger places such as Five Guys.

McDonald’s has focused so far on efforts including increased staffing at busy times, and has shaken up its management ranks, including replacing the head of its U.S. business for the second time in less than two years. But the changes have yet to boost sales or profit.

The 4.1% decline in McDonald’s September U.S. same-store sales marked the worst monthly U.S. same-store sales performance since February 2003.

In response, McDonald’s Chief Executive Don Thompson on Tuesday said it would simplify its menu starting in January, in part to remove low-selling products, and plans to give the company’s 21 domestic regions more autonomy in rolling out products that are locally relevant.

By the third quarter of next year, McDonald’s also plans to fully roll out new technology in some markets to make it easier for customers to order and pay digitally and to give people the ability to customize their orders, part of what the company terms the “McDonald’s Experience of the Future” initiative.

“The key to our success will be our ability to deliver a more relevant McDonald’s experience for all of our customers,” Mr. Thompson said. “Customers want to personalize their meals with locally relevant ingredients. They also want to enjoy eating in a contemporary, inviting atmosphere. And they


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19 Surprising Facts About The Messed Up State Of The US Economy

Courtesy of Michael Snyder of The Economic Collapse blog

Barack Obama and the Federal Reserve are lying to you.  The "economic recovery" that we all keep hearing about is mostly just a mirage.  The percentage of Americans that are employed has barely budged since the depths of the last recession, the labor force participation rate is at a 36 year low, the overall rate of homeownership is the lowest that it has been in nearly 20 years and approximately 49 percent of all Americans are financially dependent on the government at this point. 

Recently, I shared 12 charts (e.g. right) that demonstrate the permanent damage that has been done to our economy over the last decade. Many readers were upset to learn that they were not being told the truth by our politicians and by the mainstream media. Sadly, the vast majority of Americans still have no idea what is being done to our economy.  For those out there that still believe that we are doing "just fine", here are 19 more facts about the messed up state of the U.S. economy…

#1 After accounting for inflation, median household income in the United States is 8 percent lower than it was when the last recession started in 2007.

#2 The number of part-time workers in America has increased by 54 percent since the last recession began in December 2007.  Meanwhile, the number of full-time jobs has dropped by more than a million over that same time period.

#3 More than 7 million Americans that are currently working part-time jobs would actually like to have full-time jobs.

#4 The jobs gained during this "recovery" pay an average of 23 percent less than the jobs that were lost during the last recession.

#5 The number of unemployed workers that have completely given up looking for work is twice as high now as it was when the last…
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James Grant Conference Video: Inflation Expectations, Growth, Policy Problems; Europe Has Become Japan

Courtesy of Mish.

Here's an interesting video from the recent James Grant Conference. The title of this year's conference is Investing Opportunistically, Separating the Beta from the Alpha.

The first five minutes are introductions and attendee notes you may wish to skip over. The opening speech was by Marc Seidner, CFA at GMO, on inflation expectations.

Note: you may have to click on the play arrow twice to start the video.

Last year at this time a majority thought tightening was inevitable and bonds were attractively priced for those who thought otherwise now, tightening in Europe and Japan is totally priced out and even in the US, inflation expectations are down as noted by forward yield curves.

Seidner commented that 100% of strategists were negative on bonds heading into 2014 but I can name a couple exceptions, notably Lacy Hunt at Van Hoisington.

Lackluster GDP

Tepid Inflation – UK, US, EU, Japan

Historically, when inflation has been this low, talk was of easing further not tightening.

Continue here

 





Scrapes on the Sidewalk

Scrapes on the Sidewalk

Courtesy of Wade of Investing Caffeine

Baron Rothschild, an 18th century British nobleman and member of the Rothschild banking family, is credited with the investment advice to “buy when there’s blood in the streets.” Well, with the Russell 2000 correcting about -14% and the S&P 500 -8% from their 2014 highs, you may not be witnessing drenched, bloody streets, but you could say there has been some “scrapes on the sidewalk.”

Although the Volatility Index (VIX – a.k.a., “Fear Gauge”) reached the highest level since 2011 last week (31.06), the S&P 500 index still hasn’t hit the proverbial “correction” level yet. Even with some blood being shed, the clock is still running since the last -10% correction experienced during the summer of 2011 when the Arab Spring sprung and fears of a Greek exit from the EU was blanketing the airwaves. If investors follow the effective 5-year investment playbook, this recent market dip, like previous ones, should be purchased. Following this “buy-the-dip” mentality since the lows experienced in 2011 would have resulted in stock advancing about +75% in three years.

If you have a more pessimistic view of the equity markets and you think Ebola and European economic weakness will lead to a U.S. recession, then history would indicate investors have suffered about 50% of the pain. Your ordinary, garden-variety recession has historically resulted in about a -20% hit to stock prices. However, if you’re in the camp that we’re headed into another debilitating “Great Recession” as we experienced in 2008-2009, then you should brace for more pain and grab some syringes of Novocaine.

If you’re seriously considering some of these downside scenarios, wouldn’t it make sense to analyze objective data to bolster evidence of an impending recession? If the U.S. truly was on the verge of recession, wouldn’t the following dynamics likely be in place?

  • Two quarters of consecutive, negative GDP (Gross Domestic Property) data
  • Inverted yield curve
  • Rising unemployment and mass layoff announcements
  • Declining corporate profits
  • Hawkish Federal Reserve

The reality of the situation is the U.S. economy continues to expand; the yield curve remains relatively steep and positive; unemployment declined to 5.9% in the most recent month; corporate profits are at record levels…
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In Uncharted Waters

Courtesy of Charles Hugh-Smith of Of Two Minds

A long-time reader recently chastised me for using too many maybes in my forecasts. The criticism is valid, as "on the other hand" slips all too easily from qualifying a position to rinsing it of meaning.

That said, given that we're in uncharted waters, maybe is prudent and certainty is extremely dangerous. I have long held that the financial policy extremes that are now considered normal are unprecedented in the modern era: extremes in debt, leverage, risk, complexity and willful obfuscation of these extremes.
 
Consider the extent to which sky-high asset valuations and present-day "prosperity" depend on extremes of leverage: autos purchased with no money down, homes purchased with 3.5% down payments and FHA loans, stocks bought on margin, stock buybacks funded by loans, student loans issued with zero collateral, and so on--an inverted pyramid of "prosperity" resting precariously on a tiny base of actual collateral.
 
Since we have no guide to the future other than the past, we extrapolate past trends. Human nature hasn't changed over the short time-frames of civilizations (i.e. the past few thousand years), so in terms of human drives, emotions and responses, the past is an excellent guide to the range of human responses to crisis, euphoria, greed, fear, etc.
 
But extending trends is a shifting foundation for forecasts, as trends end and reverse, generally without telegraphing the end of an era. Few in 1639 China foresaw the collapse of the status quo Ming Dynasty a mere five years hence.
 
With the hindsight of history, we can discern the cracks in the Ming Dynasty before its collapse, but once we shift to our own era, things become less certain.
 
In my view, we're drifting in uncharted seas.
 
I have covered the dangers of certainty before: Certainty, Complex Systems, and Unintended Consequences (February 14, 2014)
 
What I see as extremes that must necessarily end badly, others see as mere extensions of recently successful policies and trends. Let's review a few of the many extremes that we now accept as ordinary and harmless.
 
Consider how much new debt is now required to lift GDP ("growth") off the flat line:
 
 
The slightest pause in the expansion


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IBM Has to Pay a Foreign Government $1.5 Billion to Unload a Business?

Courtesy of Pam Martens.

IBM Stock ChartIn 30 years of observing Wall Street, we can’t remember a headline like the one that appeared yesterday at Reuters: “IBM to Pay GlobalFoundries $1.5 Billion to Take Chip Unit.” When one can’t even give a business away that includes thousands of patents, IBM engineers and two operating factories, times are tough. The market thought so also; by the closing bell yesterday, IBM’s stock was down $12.95, or 7 percent, to $169.10.

The acquirer of the IBM semiconductor business, GlobalFoundries, is headquartered in Silicon Valley. Its parent is Advanced Technology Investment Company (ATIC), which is owned by the Abu Dhabi government’s investment arm, Mubadala Development Company. In May, ATIC announced it was changing its name to Mubadala Technology.

Abu Dhabi likely drove a very hard bargain with IBM in this deal because it has good reason to question promises made by American businessmen. As we reported in 2012, Abu Dhabi’s sovereign wealth fund, ADIA, previously leveled a $4 billion fraud charge against Citigroup for taking it to the cleaners in a stock deal. That deal began with a hand shake from none other than former U.S. Treasury Secretary, Robert Rubin, who was serving as Citigroup’s interim Chairman at the time.

The two manufacturing facilities that come with the IBM deal are located in East Fishkill, New York and Essex Junction, Vermont. The $1.5 billion that IBM will pay GlobalFoundries will be spread over three years and is likely to help defray costs of facility upgrades. IBM has also agreed to a 10-year deal in which GlobalFoundries will be its exclusive provider of certain chipsets.

The trajectory of IBM’s stock price and its writeoffs are starting to bring back memories of the bad hand it dealt investors in the 90s. The stock is down from a price of more than $190 in September. Yesterday, in addition to the curious “pay-to-sell” deal, IBM also announced it was taking a $4.7 billion pre-tax charge in its third quarter and reported a 4 percent drop in revenues.

Over its more than a century of operations, IBM has repeatedly reinvented itself. That reinvention, however, has meant that investors have had long spells of dead money. The worst episode in IBM’s business history came in January 1993. The company announced it had lost $5 billion in 1992…
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McDonalds Sales Plunge In Worst Month Since 2003 Following Dollar Meal “Sticker Shock”

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Moments ago, McDonalds not only released earnings and revenues, both of which missed – something which was largely expected since the backward looking data had been telegraphed by MCD's recent global selling collapse - blanketed by atrocious commentary, but it disclosed its September global retail sales which were a disaster after reporting global sales which dropped 3.8%, below the 3.2% expected, and the worst global month since at least 2003.

The pain was everywhere, with Europe plunging 4.2% (est -0.9%), Asia down 7.5%, and the US down a whopping 4.1%, far below the 2.8% expected, and also the worst month in over a decade.

 

In fact, McDonalds sales in the US have have now gone a whopping 11 months without posting a positive sales month, the longest stretch on record!

 

But while collapsing MCD sales are a combination of both the insolvent US consumer, who can no longer afford to buy either MCD or Coke (as we commented earlier) especially after purchasing the latest and greatest iThing on credit, as well as shifting tastes and eating the "cool food du jour", things are only going to get worse from here.

Because in a world that is allegedly flooded with deflation, the one place where everyone considered safe for "dollar meals", just got more expensive. Bloomberg reports:

Mike Hiner used to take his grandsons to McDonald’s (MCD) when they wanted a treat. With higher wage and food costs pushing up prices at the Golden Arches, he’s increasingly taking them to IHOP, Denny’s and Chili’s instead.

The loss of bargain-seeking customers like Hiner underscores a growing challenge for McDonald’s Corp.: While the company still offers several items for $1, its menu is quietly getting more expensive. McDonald’s said its prices were up about 3 percent through the end of June compared with 12 months earlier. That’s more than the 2.5 percent gain in prices for food Americans purchased away from their homes in the year through August, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

The chain’s diminishing appeal among budget diners — coupled with


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Benzinga's Top Upgrades

Courtesy of Benzinga.

Related CHTR
Macquarie Upgrades Charter Communications to Outperform
Macquarie Upgrades Charter Communications To Outperform
AT&T: DirecTV Deal Will Create Comcast Rival (Fox Business)

Related PXD
Guggenheim Securities Upgrades Pioneer Natural Resources To Buy
Events for the Week of Oct. 13-17, 2014
Oil Refiners Tumble, Producers Rally on Export Ruling (Fox Business)

Macquarie upgraded Charter Communications (NASDAQ: CHTR) from Neutral to Outperform. The price target for Charter Communications is set to $155. Charter Communications’ shares closed at $148.18 yesterday.

Guggenheim Securities upgraded Pioneer Natural Resources Company (NYSE: PXD) from Neutral to Buy. The price target for Pioneer Natural Resources has been lowered from $216.00 to $206.00. Pioneer Natural Resources’ shares closed at $179.71 yesterday.

Analysts at Global Hunter upgraded Devon Energy (NYSE: DVN) from Neutral to Accumulate. The price target for Devon Energy has been lowered from $80.00 to $68.00. Devon Energy’s shares closed at $57.98 yesterday.

Analysts at Janney Capital upgraded Illumina (NASDAQ: ILMN) from Neutral to Buy. The price target for Illumina has been raised from $165.00 to $192.00. Illumina’s shares closed at $164.47 yesterday.

Latest Ratings for CHTR

Date Firm Action From To
Oct 2014 Macquarie Upgrades Neutral Outperform
Sep 2014 Canaccord Genuity Initiates Coverage on Buy
Jul 2014 Albert Fried & Co. Suspends Market Perform

View More Analyst Ratings for CHTR
View the Latest Analyst Ratings

Posted-In: top upgradesUpgrades Analyst Ratings





 

Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

"Hello PSW Members –

This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743

Thank you for you time!

 
 

Zero Hedge

Equity Levitation Stumbles After Second ECB Denial Of Corporate Bond Buying, Report Of 11 Stress Test Failures

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

A day after a Reuters headline blast proclaimed that, in a stunning turn of events, the ECB which has barely started buying covered bond (of countries like Germany today for example, because the record low yielding Bunds clearly need help from the ECB) will also buy corporate bonds, sending the stock market soaring the most in 2014, it has now backtracked for the second time, and following a report from the FT yesterday which denied the report, the second denial came straight from Reuters itself which hours ago said that the ECB "has no concrete plans to buy corporate b...



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Phil's Favorites

Poster Children

Poster Children

Courtesy of 

IBM, Coca-Cola and McDonalds are three of America’s largest corporations and most well-known brands. They are true multinationals in every sense of the word and they dominate their industries both at home and abroad. They are numbers 23, 58 and 106 on the Fortune 500 list, respectively. Together, they make up 12 percent of the Dow Jones Industrial Average’s total weighting.

And all three are plagued by the same problem – they’re shrinking. More than this, their shrinkage is finally being recognized on The Street, now that investors are peeling back all of the layers of buybac...



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Chart School

S&P 500 Snapshot: Biggest Gain in More Than a Year

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Europe was in rally mode when the US markets opened, and the EURO STOXX 50 would subsequently close with a 2.19% gain. The S&P 500 opened at its intraday low, up 0.28%, and headed higher through the day to its 2.02% high in the final hour. Its closing gain of 1.96% was its best one-day performance since its 2.18% surge on October 10th of last year. The popular financial press attibutes today's gain to speculation more ECB stimulus and the strong Apple-earnings effect.

The yield on the 10-year Note closed at 2.23%, up 3 bps from yesterday's close.

Here is a 15-minute chart of the past five sessions.

Here is a daily chart of the index. In yesterday's update I pointed out the proximity of the close to the 200-day price moving average. It certainly offered no resistance today, and volume was 23% above its 50...



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All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: David is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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Sabrient

Sector Detector: Sharp selloff in stocks sets up long-awaiting buying opportunity

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Last week brought even more stock market weakness and volatility as the selloff became self-perpetuating, with nobody mid-day on Wednesday wanting to be the last guy left holding equities. Hedge funds and other weak holders exacerbated the situation. But the extreme volatility and panic selling finally led some bulls (along with many corporate insiders) to summon a little backbone and buy into weakness, and the market finished the week on a high note, with continued momentum likely into the first part of this week.

Despite concerns about global economic growth and a persistent lack of inflation, especially given all the global quantitative easing, fundamentals for U.S. stocks still look good, and I believe this overdue correction ultimately will shape up to be a great buying opportunity -- i.e., th...



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Digital Currencies

Goodbye War On Drugs, Hello Libertarian Utopia. Dominic Frisby's Bitcoin: The Future of Money?

Courtesy of John Rubino.

Now that bitcoin has subsided from speculative bubble to functioning currency (see the price chart below), it’s safe for non-speculators to explore the whole “cryptocurrency” thing. So…is bitcoin or one of its growing list of competitors a useful addition to the average person’s array of bank accounts and credit cards — or is it a replacement for most of those things? And how does one make this transition?

With his usual excellent timing, London-based financial writer/actor/stand-up comic Dominic Frisby has just released Bitcoin: The Future of Money? in which he explains all this in terms most readers will have no tr...



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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of October 20th, 2014

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Market Shadows

Falling Energy Prices: Sober Look takes a Sober Look

Falling Energy Prices: Sober Look takes a Sober Look

What do falling energy prices mean for the US consumer? Sober Look writes a brief yet thorough overview of the consequences of the correction in the price of crude oil. There are good aspects, particularly for the consumer, bad aspects, and out-right ugly possibilities. For more on this subject, read James Hamilton's How will Saudi Arabia respond to lower oil prices?  In previous eras, Saudi Arabia would tighten the supply to help increase prices, but in this "game of chicken," the rules m...



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Stock World Weekly

Stock World Weekly

Newsletter writers are available to chat with Members regarding topics presented in SWW, comments are found below each post.

Here's this week's Stock World Weekly. Just sign in with your PSW user name and password. (Or take a free trial.)

#457319216 / gettyimages.com

 

...

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Option Review

Release Of Fed Minutes, Icahn Tweet Boost Shares In Apple

Shares in Apple (Ticker: AAPL) are near their highs of the session in the final hour of trading on Wednesday, adding to the muted gains seen earlier in the day, following the release of the September FOMC meeting minutes and after activist investor and Apple shareholder Carl Icahn tweeted, “Tmrw we’ll be sending an open letter to @tim_cook. Believe it will be interesting.” Icahn’s tweet hit the ether at 2:33 pm ET and was met with a spike in volume in Apple shares. The stock is currently up 2.0% on the day at $100.75 as of 3:15 pm ET.

Chart – Apple rally accelerate...



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Promotions

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Pharmboy

Biotechs & Bubbles

Reminder: Pharmboy is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Well PSW Subscribers....I am still here, barely.  From my last post a few months ago to now, nothing has changed much, but there are a few bargins out there that as investors, should be put on the watch list (again) and if so desired....buy a small amount.

First, the media is on a tear against biotechs/pharma, ripping companies for their drug prices.  Gilead's HepC drug, Sovaldi, is priced at $84K for the 12-week treatment.  Pundits were screaming bloody murder that it was a total rip off, but when one investigates the other drugs out there, and the consequences of not taking Sovaldi vs. another drug combinations, then things become clearer.  For instance, Olysio (JNJ) is about $66,000 for a 12-week treatment, but is approved for fewer types of patients AND...



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Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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