Posts Tagged ‘FXP’

What, Me Worry Wednesday – Fitch Warns on China

The futures are bouncing!

Why are they bouncing?  Why not?  We went down and people love to buy those dips and that means they are just going to love this chart, courtesy of Barry Ritholtz's team.  We don't get our next Case-Shiller data point until the 26th but we did get mortgage applications this week and they are down ANOTHER 6.7%.  This is despite the fact that an average 30-year mortgage is still just 4.98%.

I know that we have been trained to ignore supply and demand in commodities as well as to pretend that all prices are inelastic and that American consumers will buy anything at any price because they are generally mindless sheep that you can lead into anything with the right jingle but, if they are not willing to buy a $250,000 home with a 5% mortgage – what's going to happen when that mortgage is 6%?

At 5%, a $250,000 mortgage has a monthly payment of $1,342.05.  At 6% that payment jumps up to $1,498.88 – 10.5% higher!  At 7% it's $1,663.26, 24% higher – that's the "cost" of housing as rates tick higher but, of course, that will force housing prices even lower to compensate and the Fed will tell us that inflation is low because home prices will be falling faster than food prices are rising – so we have that to look forward to…  

I mentioned yesterday that China tightened their rates and home prices in Beijing fell 26.7% in the month of March.  I waited all day to read more about it in the WSJ or Bloomberg or to see them discussing this on CNBC but no – it's not the kind of news they want you to hear so – for your own good, it is not mentioned.  I had to find this news in Business China but it's also in the China Daily and the People Daily but where it isn't is in any US newspaper I've looked at and neither is there mention of the problem caused by giant-sized, irradiated Asians poking buildings with sticks!  (just kidding).  

We talk about Chinese censorship and control of information but what is this?  If a Nigerian Rebel spits at a pipeline or if…
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , , ,




Fast and Furious Four-Day Wrap-Up

Wheeeee, what a ride!

Like any good car race, the lead changes often in the markets.  Yesterday the bears took the lead as the combination of Hungarian debt issues and a disappointing jobs number were like a tire blow-out for the bulls, who were forced to pull in for a pit stop.  Fortunately, we had our seat belts on and had assumed the crash position as I had warned Members on THURSDAY Morning at 10:04:

Watch that 666 line on the RUT – we don’t want to lose that or even show weakness there…  ISM a bit disappointing, now we’ll see what holds but I’m out of short-term, unhedged, upside plays here

I felt strongly enough about it that we also posted it on Seeking Alpha, to warn as many people as possible, under the heading: "Phil Calls Short-Term Top."  I don’t post live trade ideas on Seeking Alpha but in Premium Member Chat (and you can subscribe here) I followed right up at 10:17 Thursday morning with the following trade idea:

BGZ (large-cap bear) is at $15.27 and I like them as a hedge here with the (June) $14/16 bull call spread at .75, selling the July $14 puts for .95 and that’s a net .20 credit on the $2 spread with about $2.70 in margin so you can do a 10 contract spread for a $200 credit and $2,700 in margin (according to TOS standard) with a $2K upside if the market even twitches lower.  Worst case is you own BGZ as a hedge to a dip below Dow 10,600 (your put-to area) at net $13.80 (9% lower than current price).

That’s what hedged trade ideas look like in our Member Chat.  At PSW, you need to put some time in LEARNING how to trade and, more importantly, how to hedge.  This is a fairly complicated options play but we take it BECAUSE IT WORKS!  There are many, many simpler ways to play that don’t work (or carry far more risk) but we prefer to teach our Members how to do the things that do work.  As it stands, just 48 hours later, BGZ is up 10% on Friday to $16.89 (so the spread is now 100% in the money) and June $14/16 bull call spread is now $1.50 while the July $14 puts are Down to .60 so net .90 already on the spread that already paid
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,




Wild Weekly Wrap-Up – The Madness of the Markets (Part 1)

Where do I even begin to go over this week?

I think, to set the proper tone, let's look at my Thursday morning Alert to Members where I said: "Get out, Get Out, GET OUT of the short-term short-side plays if we get back over the 200 dmas.  Take the money and RUN.  CASH OUT THE SHORT SIDE.  Is that clear?  We may not hold these lines but that’s why we have October Disaster Hedges, the shorter-term downside plays are huge winners and should be cashed here – we’ll find something else to short if we fall off this support level.   200 dmas need to be held and those are: Dow 10,250 (8,650 is next major support), S&P 1,100 (900), Nasdaq 2,225 (not there yet!  1,800), NYSE 7,100 (5,500) and Russell 630 (still above!  500)." 

We never did hold those levels but, as I mentioned in Friday morning's post, I thought the end of day sell-off on Thursday was a bit forced, and, in my first Alert of Friday morning I said: "TAKE THOSE SHORT PROFITS OFF THE TABLE!"  Now, I am not prone to making statements in all caps in Member Chat - almost never is about how often so this was a pretty important statement.  Before that Alert, right at 9:42, I had already called for the SPY $105 calls at $2.45 as our first trade of the day.  Those calls finished at $4.11, up 67% for the day so a good start to our expiration day!

A good start and our other day trades did very nicely as well:

  • FXI June $39 calls at .98, now $1.28 - up 30%
  • DIA May $102 calls at .13, out at .45 – up 246%
  • DIA May $101 calls at .95, out at .80 - down 16%
  • DIA May $101 calls at .10, out at .80 – up 700%

Of course we followed our strategies and took 1/2 the DIA's off the table at a double so the other half was a free ride (we like to gamble but we're not crazy!) but the FXI was the only "keeper" for the day, we'll see if that was a good idea on Monday.  We also took (as I said we would in the morning post) a number of well-hedged, bullish plays on BA (from the post),
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,




Weekly Wrap-Up – Why Does This Rally Give Me the Creeps?

I’m sorry, I am trying so hard to get bullish but it’s not working

My only solution is to, as we often joke, switch off my brain and stop reading the news (listening to it is great as everything is coming up roses in TV-land) and ignore the now-exposed shenanigans on Wall Street (why should I worry about my investments just because the people running the game are up on fraud charges?) and for goodness sakes don’t even look at something as depressing as "The Economic Elite vs. the People of the United States of America," neither Parts 1-3 or Parts 4-6 because that can lead to thinking and thinking makes it REALLY hard to go to sleep at night with your money riding on the top of an 80% market while gold is trading at $1,150 an ounce because of overwhelming global instability and a total lack of faith in the global financial markets

Yep, if we don’t think about all that stuff and focus on the good stuff, like the fact that Unemployment is only 3% for those of us who earn $150,000 a year (for the poor it’s 31%), and 93% of our virtually fully-employed analysts predict the S&P will finish the year even higher (although not too much higher) with only Andrew Garhwaite of Credit Suisse in need of an "attitude adjustment" with his puny target of 1,175, which is 32 points lower than Friday’s close.  Fortunately, enlightened analysts like Deutsche Bank’s Binky Chad think we can still squeeze another 100 points out of this rally (about 10%) although Goldman Sachs is wimping out at 1,250, their partner in "whatever you want to call it", JP Morgan is up at 1,300.  So it’s BUYBUYBUY from the gang of 12 and we’ll be whipping Andrew into shape by the next report or he may find himself the fall guy for the next scandal…

Oops, sorry, I wasn’t supposed to mention the scandals as that’s not really a buying premise unless of course you look at the sheer volume of things the IBanks were getting away with and then look at the virtual nothing that is being done about it and then we can conclude there is no reason they can’t pump this market back up to Dow 14,000 because we already know it was such total BS last time, when we dropped 50% like…
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,




Wheeeeeeekly Wrap-Up

Wheeee!  That was fun – let’s do it again!

There is nothing more fun than a nice, big dip in the roller coaster that you are prepared for and nothing more terrifying than a sudden, unexpected drop you were not prepared for (think air pockets on planes).  I know my incessant harping on fundamentals gets annoying and makes me somewhat of a party pooper at market tops but think of my commentary as that "clack, clack, clack" sound you hear when a roller coaster is climbing to the top of the tracks – the sound lets you know there’s a big drop coming and the more clacks you hear – the bigger the dip is likely to be

In fact, much like a roller-coaster, most of our well-prepared members were disappointed that we didn’t get a BIGGER dip on Friday but we’ve learned not to be greedy on the bear side and to quickly take those profits on our short-term plays while we let our long-term disaster hedges run wild, waiting patiently for the big score.  By the way, it’s not that we’re perma-bears – far from it, when Cramer, Adami, Finerman, John AND Peter Najarian were telling you to crawl into a bunker and hide your head in the sand a year ago – I was the one yelling BUYBUYBUY while our hugely successful Buy List, which is the bulk of our virtual portfolios, has been all bullish since Feb 8th.   Just because we think a rally is BS, doesn’t mean we don’t participate in it!

As a fundamentalist, I believe there is a market "truth" a real value that can be placed on stocks and indexes based on reality, not hype and, when the MSM hype stampedes the herd and takes the market (or an individual stock) too far one way or the other – we simply step in and take advantage of it.  It’s not complicated but it takes a little bit more work than the average "Lightning Round" participant is used to so PSW is not for everybody – this is our JOB, not our hobby, but boy is it fun when we get it right!

Despite the sell-off this week, we still finished up over 11,000 on the Dow but poor 1,200 on the S&P couldn’t hold and Nas 2,500 was merely a brief flirtation.  The NYSE fell all the way to 7,550, down 200 from Thursday’s
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,




Which Way Wednesday – Fed Up Edition

I don’t know what Fed minutes the market red yesterday but the ones I read scared me!

As usual, I went through the minutes in Member Chat (and there’s a highlighted version in Seeking Alpha minus my color-coding) and the red (negative) statements are far outnumbering the green (shoots) in the minutes including little blow-offs like "the Federal Reserve’s total assets had risen to about $2.3 trillion" and "the Desk had been reinvesting all maturing Treasury securities by exchanging those holdings for newly issued Treasury securities" which, if you put them together in non-BS language, pretty much says: "Of the $1.3Tn in Treasuries sold in 2009, it’s hard to see how the Fed bought less than half of them, maybe closer to all of them since we rolled our short-term paper over each time, therefore buying much more than it seems."

Once again, the finger is pointed sqarely at Commercial Real Estate as, according to the minutes: "Conditions in the nonresidential construction sector generally remained poor. Real outlays on structures outside of the drilling and mining sector fell again in the fourth quarter, and nominal expenditures dropped further in January. The weakness was widespread across categories and likely reflected rising vacancy rates, falling property prices, and difficult financing conditions for new projects."  In a real economy, that statement alone would send investors running for the exits but we also got these three – all in a row:

The dollar value of commercial real estate sales remained very low in February, and the share of properties sold at a nominal loss inched higher. The delinquency rate on commercial mortgages in securitized pools increased in January, and the delinquency rate on commercial mortgages at commercial banks rose in the fourth quarter. The percentage of delinquent construction loans at banks also ticked higher in the fourth quarter. 

Delinquency rates on credit card loans in securitized pools and on auto loans at captive finance companies remained elevated in January but were down a bit from their recent peaks.

Total bank credit contracted substantially in January and February. Banks’ securities holdings declined at a modest pace after several months of steady growth, and total loans on banks’ books continued to drop.

The Fed blows off this bad news by noting that CDS rates were ignoring the weakness in CRE (so we should too?) and, even worse is the way the Fed keeps
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , ,




Short (but Wild) Weekly Wrap-Up

What a crazy week!

The markets were bucking like a bronco but were they trying to throw off the shorts prior to a move back down or trying to flush out the weak-handed longs prior to a big breakout to new levels?  After gapping open to 10,900 on Monday morning we went up to 10,950, down to 10,830 and back to 10,950 – all to finish the week at 10,927, which is up 39 points since March 23rd so don’t tell me we’re wasting out time as that’s 5 points a day baby (if we round up). 

We had the day off on Friday but we did get the critical Non-Farm Payroll data for March but, as noted in my report (and in the Member Chat), despite the very excited reaction from the futures, there is no clear indication there that either the Bulls or Bears have a lasting point.  So perhaps the wild market action is nothing more than good old-fashioned indecision – the futures flew up but then Goldman said they saw "Little Underlying Improvement" in the data and that "Productivity Gains Have Diminished Sharply" - clearly mixed signals that may take some time to resolve. 

Last weekend, I complained that it was a "6-Point Weekly Wrap-Up" as that’s all we got from the S&P, which finished at 1,166.  This week I am happy to report that we gained 12 points – all the way to 1,178 and we are closing in on that 1,080 mark, which we did touch briefly at Thursday’s open (which gave us the great shorting opportunity we had looked for in Thursday morning’s post!).  It’s not that I don’t respect the rally – technically, you have to respect the rally but that’s why we’re in cash:  We can take advantage of these huge intra-day moves down (and sometimes up) - getting our 6-second bull rides and scoring as many points as we can before the rodeo clowns turn on the buy programs and stop the ride.

Overall, it’s a pretty mindless market.  You can go long at about about 2pm and flip short about 10 am the next morning – in the futures that can add up to shocking amounts of money and it sure isn’t bad when you are using options for leverage either.  We’re sure the game will collapse one day and hopefully we’ll be able to pull the rip cord without
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,




Weekend Wrap-Up, Still Trying to Get Bullish

Writer's BlockI’m having writer’s block this weekend

Usually when I can’t think of what to write it helps me to go over our virtual portfolios so I started this morning reviewing the Buy List but I didn’t get far because it was silly.  Of 43 plays on the buy list, 39 are doing well – too well in fact to the point where it’s hard for me, in good conscience, not to say let’s kill the whole thing and get back to cash as we’re up about 20% in 2 months and that’s just ridiculous – most people would call that a good year and go on vacation

The Buy List was 100% bullish and we did catch a good bottom on our early February entries.  I was gung ho bullish then because I felt comfortable that the 10,000 line on the Dow would prevail and that we were good for a run back to the top (10,700), following, more or less, the pattern we had in 2004 (see original post for charts).  Well that’s pretty much what’s happened since then but that’s not making me happy because I see no reason we won’t complete that pattern and begin falling off a cliff shortly.

As you all know, I’m not a big fan of TA, or patterns for that matter but the reason I started looking for patterns was to try to get a handle on how long  market could really keep going up before falling victim to exhaustion.  To me it seemed we weren’t at that point on Feb 6th but now that we’ve put in that big push back up – if we can’t punch up to new highs on all our indexes then I do think it’s time for the markets to take a break.

 

Clearly I’ve been too bearish for the past couple of weeks and we are now 224 points over 10,400 on the Dow which is where I turned bearish as the January data made me lose faith in our ability to get back to 10,700.  I should have stuck to the TA because we’re a lot closer to 10,700 than we are to 10,400.  With the Russell and Nasdaq exploding to their own new highs.  You can see though, from the above chart, why I do want to wait to see the NYSE, Dow and S&P confirm this move up – it’s not far now!
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,




Wild Weekly Wrap Up – Only Halfway Through January!

Wheee, what a ride!

The week can be neatly summed up by my 1:35 comment to Members in yesterday's chat, summed the week up quite nicely as I said: "So funny, a whole week of gains I thought were ridiculous wiped out in 4 hours."  Of course it's easy to laugh when you play the market correctly – as I had said in the morning post, we had cashed out into Thursday's run up and planned on going bearish through the weekend but it turned out we got our sell-off early, jumping the $100K Virtual Portfolio, for example, up 12% in one day – enough to send us back to cash rather than risk a weekend reversal

We laid the groundwork for this little sell-off in last weekend's posts as we put up an aggressive Buy List for Members but in my regular weekend post we emphasized the need to cover our buys with "Disaster Hedges" as we were heading to the tops I had predicted when I published the "Last Charts of the Decade," where I set resistance target of Dow 10,457, S&P 1,135, Nasdaq 2,314, NYSE 7,389 and Russell 638.  As you can see, I pretty much hit them on the head, other than the Dow but that's because our year-old 5% rule calculations did not account for the change in the Dow that replaced C and GM with TRV and CVX, who added about 100 Dow points since their inclusion so we started using 10,549 this month and we'll make it 10,557 for today's chart, which makes perfect sense looking at this group (I added the Transports as they are fell right off our 2,000 target, giving us the early warning that things were not right):

As you can see, the 5% Rule rules!  I will apologize for being such a grump this week but the rally was really starting to annoy me as it was so blatantly forced up through our levels without a proper test that is was really getting me down about the markets.  I don't mind that the markets are manipulated, that's been going on since markets were invented – it's stupid and destructive manipulation that bothers me, the kind that, long term, destroys more investor confidence than it builds and squanders…
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,




Wild Weekly Wrap-Up

Wheee – that was fun!

Last week, I asked the question were we "Too Bearish or Just Too Early?"  I said in that wrap-up: "This Friday the market topped out about 150 points higher than last Friday, closer to the top of our range so we went much more bearish on Friday, perhaps too bearish considering this was the best Friday finish since Nov 6th and we haven’t had a down Monday since October 26th."  We did get the move up we feared on Monday but we stuck to our guns and had a fabulous week.

Even as the market was going against us Monday morning, my first Alert of the week to members at 9:44 said: "I’m still more inclined to look downward at: Dow 10,250, S&P 1,100, Nasdaq 2,187, NYSE 7,200 and Russell 600…  I’m still bearish because oil is weak, gold is weak, the financials (XLF at 14.30) are weak and most of the good news we are hearing is nothing but fluff."  That was a pretty good call as we hit our target levels yesterday and held them, so we flipped more bullish right at 11:30 on Friday, in what was some very good timing for our intra-day play. 

We are still on a stock market roller coaster that's going to have plenty of ups and down in the thin, holiday trading that will likely characterize the end of the year.  The market will be closed 2 Fridays in a row and good luck finding people around this Thursday or the next one so 6 proper trading days left to 2009 at best.  We got out – that drop was very satisfying and we've moved mainly to cash (our $100K Virtual Portfolio has $88,000 in cash at $107,249 at the end of it's first month).  Last week we were able to cash out the bull side, this week we got satisfaction from our bear plays and that leaves us footloose and fancy free to have fun the next two weeks.  If our day trading goes as well as it did on Friday, we can end this year with quite a bang.

Manic Monday – Dubai, CitiGroup and GS Move Markets

This picture says it all.  When you want to blow smoke
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,




 
 
 

Zero Hedge

The US Can't Afford To Let Shale Fail

Courtesy of ZeroHedge View original post here.

Authored by Robert Rapier via OilPrice.com,

It’s no secret that the growth of U.S. shale oil has been a thorn in the sides of both Saudi Arabia and Russia. They have seen their market shares erode as the shale boom made the U.S. the world’s largest producer of crude oil. But Saudi Arabia’s national oil company, Saudi Aramco, is a single entity that produces 13 percent of the world’s oil and controls 17 percent of the world’s proved reserves. That puts them in a very p...



more from Tyler

ValueWalk

Treasury Secretary Mnuchin on small business help plans

By Jacob Wolinsky. Originally published at ValueWalk.

CNBC transcript: Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin Speaks with CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street” today on small business help related to coronavirus

WHEN: Today, Wednesday, April 1, 2020

WHERE: CNBC’s “Squawk on the Street

Q4 2019 hedge fund letters, conferences and more

Full interview with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on small business help

JIM CRAMER: It’s our pleasure to bring in Steven Mnuchi...



more from ValueWalk

Kimble Charting Solutions

S&P Facing A Historical Kiss of Resistance?

Courtesy of Chris Kimble

Is the S&P starting out a new month and quarter at a very important price point? This chart would say YES!

This chart looks at the S&P 500 on a weekly basis over the past 12-years, reflecting that it has spent the majority of the past 9-years “inside of this rising channel and above its 200-week moving average!”

The weakness in March saw the S&P break below the bottom of the channel and its 200-week ma line for the first time in 9-years.

The small counter-trend rally last week has the S&...



more from Kimble C.S.

The Technical Traders

Weakness Appears To Be Setting For This Weeks Economic Data

Courtesy of Technical Traders

As the world reacts to the global economic slowdown because of the COVID-19 virus event and the massive stimulus programs and central bank efforts to support the global economy, investors still expect weakness in the US and foreign markets.  We believe this expected weakness will not subside until news of a proper resolution to this virus event is rooted in the minds of investors and global markets.

Hong Kong and China are currently concerned about experiencing a “third wave” of the COVID-19 virus within their society.  As the economies open back up to somewhat normal, people are very concerned that a renewed wave of new infections will suddenly appear and potenti...



more from Tech. Traders

Phil's Favorites

Mr. Morgan

 

Mr. Morgan

Courtesy of 

The Federal Reserve had a precursor before it became the lender of last resort. It wasn’t an institution or a government department. It was a single, solitary man named J. Pierpont Morgan. Mr. Morgan, he was called in the newspapers, and you didn’t need to go any further – everyone knew to whom you were referring.

Stock market panics were common in the early 1900’s because of the agrarian nature of the economy. Each summer, the local banks that catered to farmers throughout the country began calling their money back from the banks in New York City and Chicago so they could raise enough capital to bring in the h...



more from Ilene

Insider Scoop

Why NanoVibronix's Stock Is Trading Higher Today

Courtesy of Benzinga

NanoVibronix (NASDAQ: NAOV) shares are trading higher on Wednesday.

The company announced it has received reimbursement approval from the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services for its PainShield.

NanoVibronix focuses on the manufacturing and sale of noninvasive biological response-activating devices that target biofilm prevention, wound healing, and pain therapy. Its principal products include UroShield, an ultrasound-based product to prevent bacterial colonization and biofilm in urinary catheters, enhance antibiotic efficacy,...



http://www.insidercow.com/ more from Insider

Biotech/COVID-19

The new coronavirus emerged from the global wildlife trade - and may be devastating enough to end it

 

The new coronavirus emerged from the global wildlife trade – and may be devastating enough to end it

Government officers seize civets in a wildlife market in Guangzhou, China to prevent the spread of the SARS disease, Jan. 5, 2004. Dustin Shum/South China Morning Post via Getty Images

Courtesy of George Wittemyer, Colorado State University

COVID-19 is one of countless emerging infectious diseases that are zoonotic, meaning they originate in animals. ...



more from Biotech/COVID-19

Chart School

Big moving Averages and macro investment decisions

Courtesy of Read the Ticker

When price is falling every one wonders where demand will come in.


RTT black screen Tv videos study the simplest measure of price (simple moving average). What has happen before guides us now. 














Changes in the world is the source of all market moves, to catch and ride the change we believe a combination of Gann Angles, ...

more from Chart School

Members' Corner

10 ways to spot online misinformation

 

10 ways to spot online misinformation

When you share information online, do it responsibly. Sitthiphong/Getty Images

Courtesy of H. Colleen Sinclair, Mississippi State University

Propagandists are already working to sow disinformation and social discord in the run-up to the November elections.

Many of their efforts have focused on social media, where people’s limited attention spans push them to ...



more from Our Members

Digital Currencies

While coronavirus rages, bitcoin has made a leap towards the mainstream

 

While coronavirus rages, bitcoin has made a leap towards the mainstream

Get used to it. Anastasiia Bakai

Courtesy of Iwa Salami, University of East London

Anyone holding bitcoin would have watched the market with alarm in recent weeks. The virtual currency, whose price other cryptocurrencies like ethereum and litecoin largely follow, plummeted from more than US$10,000 (£8,206) in mid-February to briefly below US$4,000 on March 13. Despite recovering to the mid-US$6,000s at the time of writin...



more from Bitcoin

Promotions

Free, Live Webinar on Stocks, Options and Trading Strategies

TODAY's LIVE webinar on stocks, options and trading strategy is open to all!

Feb. 26, 1pm EST

Click HERE to join the PSW weekly webinar at 1 pm EST.

Phil will discuss positions, COVID-19, market volatility -- the selloff -- and more! 

This week, we also have a special presentation from Mike Anton of TradeExchange.com. It's a new service that we're excited to be a part of! 

Mike will show off the TradeExchange's new platform which you can try for free.  

...

more from Promotions

Lee's Free Thinking

Why Blaming the Repo Market is Like Blaming the Australian Bush Fires

 

Why Blaming the Repo Market is Like Blaming the Australian Bush Fires

Courtesy of  

The repo market problem isn’t the problem. It’s a sideshow, a diversion, and a joke. It’s a symptom of the problem.

Today, I got a note from Liquidity Trader subscriber David, a professional investor, and it got me to thinking. Here’s what David wrote:

Lee,

The ‘experts’ I hear from keep saying that once 300B more in reserves have ...



more from Lee

Mapping The Market

How IPOs Are Priced

Via Jean Luc 

Funny but probably true:

...

more from M.T.M.





About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

Learn more About Phil >>


As Seen On:




About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.