Guest View
User: Pass: | become a member
Archive for 2009

Trading Strategies – Entry, Exit, Position Size

My strategies for trading are obviously going to be very different than Phil’s strategies. For one, I day-trade stocks and do not work with longer term option strategies.  My specific investment style is focused on short term investments that gain 2-5%. These rapid fire lucrative trades start to build up into a profitable long term virtual portfolio over time. The keys to my trading strategy are early entry, short term holds, and the earliest exit as possible.

Entry

I enter a stock based on what it can do in one to two days (maximum). When I look at a stock, I want to decide where it can be at the end of the day and whether I will be able to enter and exit it in this short term period for a 2-5% gain. Finding winners is the hardest part of day trading, while the entry, to me, is more of a system.

My entry strategy for a given equity depends on whether it has good fundamentals or bad fundamentals, as well as, whether the stock market looks to be moving upwards or downwards for the day. If a stock has good fundamentals for the day (good earnings, upgrades, bullish sector news) and the market looks like it is going to be green, the given stock will most likely gap up. On that gap up, some traders that were in the stock prior to the day will take profits. Usually on any gap up of 2% or higher, there will be a slight pullback in the first ten to fifteen minutes. This pullback is where I want to enter, because it will likely present the most discounted price that I will be able to get for the day, unless for some reason the market turns south.

If the market is looking particularly weak, I tend to stay away from stocks that have strong fundamentals because they probably won’t be able to have a lot of upward movement. Instead, I look to enter short on a stock that is either extremely overvalued, opening 10% up or more, or a stock that has bad fundamentals. When the market is looking red, I enter the stock almost right away. If there are poor fundamentals combined with a bad market, the stock has no reason to move up at the open
continue reading





The Week Ahead and Two Weekly Picks

A number of increasing stories and analysts seem to be growing more and more cautious about the stock market. It is not that most agree we are in a great position and the economy is recovering. What they all seem to be saying is that we moved pretty fast, and the market has become a bit OVERVALUED.

For example, I took a quick glance at Seeking Alpha tonight. On their "Macro View" section, the company has a market outlook section with stories about what direction writers believe the market is going. On it, the stories are 2:1 in a negative view of the market. Now, it is always easier to be a bear when the market gets much higher and looks ready for a correction, but if most people are thinking like this…doesn’t that mean its most likely market sentiment.

The market has made some ridiculously great profits, but this week might be a bit of a weaker week. Let’s rundown what is happening this week, what to expect, and what will shape this market’s red and green days.

To start, over the weekend, the big news we got was the shutting down of Colonial Bank. Colonial Bank was a major mortgage lender out of Montgomery, AL. The bank closing was the largest of the year, and the sixth largest of all time. The company had over $20 billion in assets. This is not some measly mom and pop joint. This was a large, second tier, regional bank. BB&T Corp. will be taking over the bank, but this should have some very adverse effects in the market. Especially, since financials have had such a strong run as of late.

One of the most defining economic data points for the week will be housing data. Monthly information on building permits, housing starts, and existing home sales for the month of July will be released. While I cannot venture to guess which way they will go, my one worry is that housing has had a great run. If the data is not exceptional, will it mean the housing sector could come unwinding. Plus, with how exceptional and unexpected last month’s numbers were, could the data be a bit overreaching.

Another important aspect of this week is the retail earnings. Big names in retail continue to release earnings. What we saw last week…
continue reading





Guest Post: Shining A Light On Expert Networks

Courtesy of Tyler Durden

Submitted by reader Hedgehod’s Repent

 





Just Who’s Buying This Rally?

Here’s an interesting article by Graham Summers that touches on an issue discussed earlier today – it does not take $2.7 trillion actual dollars to move the stock market up $2.7 trillion in apparent value.  As a corollary, it wouldn’t take that much selling to move it back down. – Ilene

Just Who’s Buying This Rally?

stock market bubble, ponzi schemeRoughly 30% of US household wealth was destroyed by the collapse in housing and the 2008 Crash. Currently it stands at about $15 trillion, down % from $22 trillion at the 2007 peak. For simplicity’s sake, we’ll call this “assets.”

Now, consider that total US household debt stands at $13 trillion ($2.5 trillion in credit and $10.4 trillion in mortgage). As we noted in previous issues, consumers have only paid off about $50 billion in credit (about 2% of this).  Thus we have US household equity at about $2 trillion.

Because consumers can no longer use their homes as ATMs (the home equity line of credit era is over), if we’re going to track how much US household money has flowed into the stock market, we need to focus on money market funds: the proverbial “sidelines” of the stock market.

Well, since March 2009, only $400 billion has flowed out of money market funds. Even more interesting is the fact that individual investors are pouring more money into bonds and income plays rather than stocks: for July, only $4 billion flowed into stock mutual funds compared to $28 billion for bonds.

In spite of this lack of participation, the stock market has kicked off a $2.7 trillion rally since the March lows. With only $400 billion potentially coming from individual investors. we can deduce that US households have only contributed 14% or less of the market’s gains.

Where did the other 86% ($2.3 trillion) come from?

See the Fed’s Balance Sheet, Factors Supplying Reserve Funds. This is essentially the money the Fed has put into the system via various lending windows and liquidity swaps.

As of July 30, it stood at $2.01 trillion.

It’s not hard to see what’s going on here. The Fed lends out money to Wall Street banks. Wall Street banks then use the money to recapitalize their balance sheets and push the stock market higher, creating the illusion of “recovery” and “bull markets” in an effort to get US consumers to “buy in” or begin spending…
continue reading





Dragon-Kings, Black Swans And The Prediction Of Crises

Courtesy of Tyler Durden

Didier Sornette on “Dragon-Kings, Black Swans and the Prediction of Crises” – for all you Taleb fans:

This leads to two consequences, one pessimistic and the other one more optimistic. The first one is the unavoidable evidence that extreme events occur much more often than would be predicted or expected from the observations of small, medium and even large events. Thus, catastrophes and crises are with us all the time. On the other hand, we have argued that the dragon-kings reveal the presence of special mechanisms. These processes provide clues that allow us to  diagnose the maturation of a system towards a crisis, as we have documented in a series of examples in various systems.

We have emphasized the use of the concept of a “phase transition – bifurcation – catastrophe – tipping – point,” which is crucial to learn how to diagnose in advance the symptoms of the next great crisis, as most crises occur under only smooth changes of some control variables, without the need for an external shock of large magnitude.

 

Attachment Size
Dragon King.pdf 916.39 KB




PE Bidders Not Allowed For Guaranty Financial Ahead Of Monday Deadline

Courtesy of Tyler Durden

The Financial Times is reporting that even as the FDIC probably managed to avert disaster by pushing off Colonial on to BB&T’s lap on Friday, its troubles keep escalating. Sheila Bair is trying hard to sell Texas’ Guaranty Financial ahead of a Monday deadline, however it may have used up its jokers on Colonial, which was supposed to be the “easy sell.”

Guaranty’s fate has become intertwined in recent weeks with that of Colonial Bank, an Alabama-based bank that was forcibly closed on Friday and largely sold to BB&T, another regional bank, in an FDIC-backed deal.

The FDIC, which is juggling failing banks around the US in an effort to minimise the fallout to consumers, had initially wanted to resolve Guaranty’s problems before Colonial’s by arranging a sale of Guaranty, which is struggling under the weight of burgeoning losses on homebuilder loans and mortgage-backed securities.

But regulators’ concerns over Colonial’s instability recently overtook their worries about Guaranty, because of Colonial’s deteriorating credit quality and its role in two federal investigations, so regulators contacted bidders and asked for offers for Colonial last week.

Regulators have been hoping that three banks that had bid for Colonial – Canada’s Toronto Dominion, JPMorgan and Spain’s BBVA – would step in instead as bidders for Guaranty.

Ironically, Sheila is doing as much as it can to prevent PE interest in the failed bank, effectively giving all the leverage in the hands of the banks, which are able to submit lowball bids, in the absence of other, truly interested parties:

At least one private equity consortium, which includes Blackstone, Carlyle, Oak Hill Capital, TPG and Gerald Ford, is considering a bid for Guaranty.

The FDIC, however, has long made clear that it prefers other banks as buyers of troubled financial institutions rather than private equity firms.

Heading into the weekend, the private equity firms had not been given access to Guaranty’s confidential financial data.

One wonders why the artificial barrier, but then one remembers that other BHC’s have access to the Fed’s discount window, and if the artificially inflated loans on Guaranty’s balance sheet actually have to get repriced to par, the banks will have much better access to capital than some mere, capitalist…
continue reading





Coming Soon: Banking Crisis of Historic Proportions

Coming Soon: Banking Crisis of Historic Proportions

Courtesy of John Lounsbury writing at Seeking Alpha

With everyone (well, almost everyone – I am one of the lonely skeptics) convinced that we have stepped back from the "edge of the abyss", the title of this article may be viewed as laughable. When you connect the dots, as I will in this article, you will at least stop laughing, and, maybe, realize that we still have a big problem.

We have a confluence of five factors that have the potential to create damage to banking not seen in 80 years, and that includes the Great Depression. We’ll hit these factors one at a time.

First Factor: Banks Are Not Doing Enough Business

Commercial bank credit growth has dropped to 2%, according to Jesse’s Cafe Americain (here). The recent history of credit growth is shown in the following graph.

bank credit

Now, it is a good thing that banks are conserving capital, since they need to increase capital to offset bad loans.

the perfect storm (financial storm)But, if asset valuations deteriorate (and that is quite possible), the banks need to increase earnings to "earn their way" out of their problem. Interest paid by the Fed for reserves on deposit there (by the commercial banks) are not producing nearly the same level of income as new credit issued commercially under our fractional reserve banking system with much higher interest .

If credit issuance does not increase year over year, banks can not improve their financial condition unless the quality of their existing loan portfolio improves.

As discussed in the third factor, below, just the opposite is anticipated for loan portfolios.

So the first factor in this perfect storm is that the banks are not doing enough business.

Second Factor: Banks Are Failing at a Rate Not Anticipated Two Months Ago

In his article, Jesse mentions reports by Bloomberg that 150 banks are in trouble. Some of these will be larger than many of the 77 (mostly community) banks that have gone under FDIC receivership so far in 2009.

Banks mentioned being in trouble by Bloomberg (here) include Wisconsin’s Marshall & Ilsley Corp. (MI), Georgia’s Synovus Financial Corp. (SNV), Michigan’s Flagstar Bancorp (…
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , ,




Recent Capital Markets Transactions Update

Courtesy of Tyler Durden

Recent trends indicate that the pick up in corporate finance transactions, especially in the equity capital market may be petering off. After hitting an unprecedented high in June as the market reached the head of what had previously been seen as a fake head and shoulders formation, the July afterburners in the secondary market did not translate into primary market strength. Additionally, the August run rate indicates that the primary market may well have peaked in the May-June timeframe. In the current year the sector which has benefited the most from primary market issuance has unquestionably been Financials, where over $96 billion has been raised in the form of 251 issues. A distant second at less than half the total proceeds is Materials at $42 billion with 3968 unique deals, and bronze goes to real estate which managed to raise $37.5 billion in 162 deals. On the other end, the sector least in need (or least capable of raising) equity capital is telecommunications with just $3.6 billion in 29 deals and retail just above it at $3.8 billion in 43 deals. Yet retail is probably the sector that has benefited the most from the irrational exuberance over the past few months: could this be indicative that neither companies, nor potential investors take the overinflated retail valuations as conducive to a “value” primary entry point? If these companies are unable to capitalize on the ramp up in equities, what good is the use of company stock as valuation proxy? True, stocks can hit 1000x P/E but if this can not be converted into much needed corporate cash, what good is any such rally?

Yet what some may perceive as weakness in equity, has translated into strength for not only investment grade, but also high yield bonds. Primary market investors are gradually retracing and instead of looking at 20% returns promised by primary market operations, they are now content and much more interested with picking 5-10% returns.

LTM Investment grade bond issuance:

The sectors benefiting the most from a high yield issuance bonanza include Media and Entertainment, raising $15.6 billion in 36 deals, followed by Energy and Power and Materials, with $12.4 and $12.2 billion, in 38 and 28 deals, respectively.

Ironically, only 2 real estate high yield deals have been completed to date for $822 million, with consumer services, and retail both…
continue reading





Collapse Of The “Ownership Society”

Collapse Of The "Ownership Society"

Courtesy of Mish

Bush’s "ownership society" has collapsed under the dead weight of debt. There is too much debt and too little income to support it. Please consider President shifts focus to renting, not owning.

The Obama administration, in a major shift on housing policy, is abandoning George W. Bush’s vision of creating an “ownership society’’ and instead plans to pump $4.25 billion of economic stimulus money into creating tens of thousands of federally subsidized rental units in American cities.

The idea is to pay for the construction of low-rise rental apartment buildings and town houses, as well as the purchase of foreclosed homes that can be refurbished and rented to low- and moderate-income families at affordable rates.

Analysts say the approach takes a wrecking ball to Bush’s heavy emphasis on encouraging homeownership as a way to create national wealth and provide upward mobility for low- and working-class families, especially minorities. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan’s recalibration of federal housing policy, they said, shows that the Obama White House has acknowledged that not everyone can or should own a home.

In addition to an ideological shift, the move is a practical response to skyrocketing foreclosure rates, tight credit, and the economic crisis.

Barney Frank The Hypocrite

"I’ve always said the American dream should be a home – not homeownership," said Representative Barney Frank, chairman of the House Financial Services Committee and one of the earliest critics of the Bush administration’s push to put mortgages in the hands of low- and moderate-income people.

What a distortion of reality. Barney Frank was in the pocket of Fannie Mae and Freddie make and their biggest supporter for years. Now he plays on semantics in an unbelievable lie. He would have been better off keeping his mouth shut, but political hacks seldom if ever can.

It’s Better To Rent

The "Rentership Society" as Calculated Risk dubs it, reminds me of a chart I put together way back in Spring of 2005. Note the lower right hand corner of the top chart.

 

San Diego Home Prices (with thanks to piggington)

The above charts are from It’s a Totally New Paradigm written March 26, 2005. Here are some excerpts from that post.

  • Ron Shuffield, president of Esslinger-Wooten-Maxwell Realtors says that "South Florida is


continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,




Guest Post: The Blue Tulip

Courtesy of Tyler Durden

The Blue Tulip (pdf) submitted by Ted Ely

 

Attachment Size
The Blue Tulip 8-11-09.pdf 29.95 KB




 
 
 

Zero Hedge

ROFL NATO!

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by williambanzai7.

...

more from Tyler

Phil's Favorites

Amazing Story From Japan

Courtesy of John Rubino.

Here’s something you don’t see very often: For a day and a half this week, the Japanese government’s benchmark 10-year bonds attracted not a single successful private sector bid. At today’s artificially-depressed yields, no one wants this paper — except of course the Bank of Japan, which is buying up the bonds with newly-created yen. As the Gulf Times noted:

Japan bond market liquidity dries up as BoJ holding crosses ¥200tn The Bank of Japan’s massive purchases of government debt hit a milestone this week, sucking liquidity out of the market to such an extent that the benchmark 10-year bond went untraded for more than a day, the first time in 13 years.

D...



more from Ilene

Chart School

S&P 500 Snapshot: Rally Day Three, Back in the Green for 2014

Courtesy of Doug Short.

When the US market opened, Japan's Nikkei had closed with a massive 3.01% gain and the EURO STOXX 50 was in rally mode, ultimately to log a 1.54% advance. The Federal Reserve had published better-than-forecast March Industrial Production data with a substantial upward revision to the February numbers. The S&P 500 popped at the open and rose in a couple of waves through the day to its 1.05% intraday high at the closing bell. This was the third day of gains and enough to put the index back in the green year-to-date but still 1.51% off its record closing high set ten sessions ago on April 2nd.

The yield on the 10-year note finished at 2.65%, up 1 bp from Friday's close and 5 bps off the 2014 low of 2.60%.

Here is a snapshot of the past five sessions.

Volume for today's advance was above slightly below its 50-day moving average. The c...



more from Chart School

Option Review

Short Term Bearish Options Trade On Las Vegas Sands

A roughly quarter of a million dollar play in the 17Apr’14 expiry $74 strike put options on Las Vegas Sands Corp (Ticker: LVS) caught our eye this morning, as just one full trading session remains in the life of these contracts in this holiday-shortened week. Shares in LVS are up more than 2.0% on the session at $74.90 just before 11:30 am ET and off an earlier session high of $75.44. Like many of the relative outperformers of 2014, shares in LVS have declined substantially since the beginning of March, down around 15% at its current level from a high of $88.28. Recent sessions have been volatile in this and other high-beta names, and perhaps this environment is just what the morning’s put trader is looking for ahead of expiration.

...

more from Caitlin

All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: David is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

more from David

Sabrient

What the Market Wants: Positive News and Stocks at Bargain Prices

Courtesy of David Brown, Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Last week’s market performance was nasty again, especially for the Small-cap Growth style/cap, down 4%.  Large-caps faired the best, losing only 2.7%.  That’s ugly and today’s market seemed likely to be uglier today with escalating tensions over the weekend in Ukraine. 

But once again, positive economic trumped the beating of the war drums. Retail Sales jumped up 1.1% over a projected 0.8% and last month’s tepid 0.3%, which was revised up to 0.7%.  While autos led, sales were up solidly overall.  Business inventories were about as expected with a positive tone.  Citigroup (C) handily beat estimates to add to the morning’s surprises.  As a result, the market was positive through most of the day, led by the DJI, up 0.91%, and the S&P 500, up 0.82%.  NASDAQ had a less...



more from Sabrient

Digital Currencies

Facebook Takes Life Seriously and Moves To Create Its Own Virtual Currency, Increases UltraCoin Valuation Significantly

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Reggie Middleton.

The Financial Times reports:

[Facebook] The social network is only weeks away from obtaining regulatory approval in Ireland for a service that would allow its users to store money on Facebook and use it to pay and exchange money with others, according to several people involved in the process. 

The authorisation from Ireland’s central bank to become an “e-money” institution would allow ...



more from Bitcoin

OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of April 14th 2014

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here...



more from OpTrader

Market Shadows

Winning: Defined as Losing Less

By Paul Price of Market Shadows

Market Shadows Excelled – With a 1.36% Weekly Decline

In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is King. Our Virtual Value Porfolio took on that role this week as we lost a modest 1.36% of our value while the DJIA, S&P 500 and Nasdaq Composite dropped from 2.35% - 3.10%.

We remain bullish despite the shaky end of week sentiment. Our original $100,000 now totals $145,058 including our 2.8% cash reserve.

 ...



more from Paul

Stock World Weekly

Stock World Weekly

Newsletter writers are available to chat with Members regarding topics presented in SWW, comments are found below each post.

Here is the new Stock World Weekly. Please sign in with your user name and password, or sign up for a free trial to Stock World Weekly. Click here. 

Chart by Paul Price.

...

more from SWW

Promotions

See Live Demo Of This Google-Like Trade Algorithm

I just wanted to be sure you saw this.  There’s a ‘live’ training webinar this Thursday, March 27th at Noon or 9:00 pm ET.

If GOOGLE, the NSA, and Steve Jobs all got together in a room with the task of building a tremendously accurate trading algorithm… it wouldn’t just be any ordinary system… it’d be the greatest trading algorithm in the world.

Well, I hate to break it to you though… they never got around to building it, but my friends at Market Tamer did.

Follow this link to register for their training webinar where they’ll demonstrate the tested and proven Algorithm powered by the same technological principles that have made GOOGLE the #1 search engine on the planet!

And get this…had you done nothing b...



more from Promotions

Pharmboy

Here We Go Again - Pharma & Biotechs 2014

Reminder: Pharmboy is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Ladies and Gentlemen, hobos and tramps,
Cross-eyed mosquitoes, and Bow-legged ants,
I come before you, To stand behind you,
To tell you something, I know nothing about.

And so the circus begins in Union Square, San Francisco for this weeks JP Morgan Healthcare Conference.  Will the momentum from 2013, which carried the S&P Spider Biotech ETF to all time highs, carry on in 2014?  The Biotech ETF beat the S&P by better than 3 points.

As I noted in my previous post, Biotechs Galore - IPOs and More, biotechs were rushing to IPOs so that venture capitalists could unwind their holdings (funds are usually 5-7 years), as well as take advantage of the opportune moment...



more from Pharmboy



FeedTheBull - Top Stock market and Finance Sites



About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

Learn more About Phil >>


As Seen On:




About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

Market Shadows >>