Archive for 2010

Matthew Simmons: Lightning Rod for Gulf Oil Controversy

Courtesy of George Washington

Washington’s Blog

Matthew Simmons has made a lot of big claims about the oil spill (see videos below).

Because of his background, Simmons has been interviewed repeatedly in television, newspaper and radio media. Simmons was an energy adviser to President George W. Bush, is an adviser to the Oil Depletion Analysis Centre, and is a member of the National Petroleum Council and the Council on Foreign Relations, and is former chairman and CEO of Simmons & Company International, an investment bank catering to oil companies.

People have become polarized around Simmons as a lightning rod. For example, people who believe all of Simmons’ claims believe that anyone who questions any of Simmons’s claims is working for BP. On the other extreme, people who think Simmons has gone senile or is simply talking his book (he’s short BP) tar and feather anyone who questions BP’s version of the Gulf narrative as being a crazy Simmons follower.

So let’s assess Simmons’ claims one-by-one. And – more importantly – let’s refocus the discussion away from one person and towards the Gulf itself (Simmons himself will either be vindicated, proven off-base, or something in between. But that is his personal concern, not ours).

BP’s stock Will Go to Zero

Simmons predicts that BP’s stock will go to zero. he might be right. Fines under the Clean Water Act are $4,300 per barrel of oil spilled into the Gulf of Mexico. And civil and criminal damages could be substantial.

But BP has been doing everything in its power to lowball the amount of oil spilled into the Gulf (and see this), even though it easily could have easily quantified how much oil is spilling. If the government allows BP to get away with lowballing the spill number, the fines won’t bankrupt BP.

Similarly, if the government let’s BP maintain its $75 million liability cap on economic damages, let’s BP hide the extent of the damage to the Gulf (see this and this), to perform only a superficial clean up of the Gulf and fails to press criminal charges (or let’s BP off with a slap on the wrist), then BP might survive by selling assets.

And remember, BP is still one of the largest suppliers of oil to the U.S. military. See this and this.

In…
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With Stocks, It’s Not the Economy

Decoupling between stock prices and the domestic economy – and Zachary Karabell explains why he believes this trend will continue. – Ilene 

With Stocks, It’s Not the Economy

By Zachary Karabell, courtesy of TIME 

 

Illustration by Harry Campbell for TIME

From the beginning of May until late June, stock markets worldwide declined sharply, with losses surpassing 10%. The first weeks of July brought only marginal relief. Ominous voices began to warn that the weakness of stocks was a direct response to the stalling of an economic recovery that has lasted barely a year. Anxiety over debt-laden European countries — most notably Greece — combined with stubbornly high unemployment in the U.S. to create a toxic but fertile mix that allowed concern to blossom into full-bloom fear.

The most common refrain was that stocks are weak because global economic activity is sagging. A July 12 report by investment bank Credit Suisse was titled Are the Markets Forecasting Recession? With no more stimulus spending on the horizon in the U.S., Europeans on austerity budgets and consumer sentiment best characterized as surly, the sell-off in stocks was explained as a simple response to an economy on the ropes. 

It’s a good story and a logical one. But it distorts reality. Stocks are no longer mirrors of national economies; they are not — as is so commonly said — magical forecasting mechanisms. They are small slices of ownership in specific companies, and today, those companies have less connection to any one national economy than ever before.

As a result, stocks are not proxies for the U.S. economy, or that of the European Union or China, and markets are deeply unreliable gauges of anything but the underlying strength of the companies they represent and the schizophrenic mind-set of the traders who buy and sell the shares. There has always been a question about just how much of a forecasting mechanism markets are. Hence the saying that stocks have…
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A Bearish Predisposition?

Courtesy of Leo Kolivakis

Via Pension Pulse.

From systemic risk of capitalism, we move on to more current events. I had lunch today with Greg Gregoriou, a professor of Finance at SUNY (Plattsburgh) Greg has published many books and articles, and his most recent article with Razvan Pascalau on the optimal number managers in funds of hedge funds has garnered much attention.

Interestingly, while some major funds of hedge funds lost out in the crisis, assets from global pensions remain stable. Moreover, hedge funds are much more focused on meeting institutional demands:

Pension funds globally typically allocated less than 5 per cent of their portfolio to hedge funds or funds of hedge funds (while targeting an allocation of 6-10 per cent), and while this share has increased over the last few years, many expect it to double or triple in the years ahead.

 

In the US, private sector pension funds look to allocate on average up to 10 per cent of assets to hedge funds, a little ahead of America’s public sector pensions, which target about 8 per cent. In the UK, some of the biggest schemes allocate up to 15 per cent of their portfolio to hedge funds. In continental Europe, the take-up of hedge funds by pensions has been more mixed, but pension funds in some markets, such as the Netherlands, have embraced hedge funds and other alternative investment strategies.

 

The global economic crisis provided only a temporary interruption in the growth of institutional investments. Investors pulled about $300bn (£197bn, €232bn) out of hedge funds between October 2008 and June 2009, but inflows returned to healthy levels in the second half of 2009. Recent surveys by Credit Suisse and Deutsche Bank suggest the industry may attract $200bn-$300bn of new capital this year. It appears a large part of redemptions that followed the 2008 crunch were from wealthy individuals rather than institutions, and that institutions continued contributing new capital throughout most of 2009.

 

As part of their own growth and maturation, and in response to greater institutional investor demand, hedge fund managers and firms of all sizes have become more institutionalised in terms of their internal systems, structures and general operational infrastructure. This can be seen in the use of risk management


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Cheeky's Futures Charts – July 25

Courtesy of RobotTrader

Futures are off and kicking….

 

Indexes

 

 

Energy

 

 

Metals

 

 

Agricultural commodities

 

 

Bonds

 

 

Currencies

 

 

 

New Zealand

 

 

Australia

 

 

Japan

 

 

Korea

 

 

Hong Kong

 

 

Dubai

 

 

Shenzen Stock Exchange

 

 

Shanghai

 

 

India

 

 





Cheeky’s Futures Charts – July 25

Courtesy of RobotTrader

Futures are off and kicking….

 

Indexes

 

 

Energy

 

 

Metals

 

 

Agricultural commodities

 

 

Bonds

 

 

Currencies

 

 

 

New Zealand

 

 

Australia

 

 

Japan

 

 

Korea

 

 

Hong Kong

 

 

Dubai

 

 

Shenzen Stock Exchange

 

 

Shanghai

 

 

India

 

 





Weekly Market Commentary: Pushes Higher

Weekly Market Commentary: Pushes Higher

Courtesy of Fallond Stock Picks 

The S&P closed the week up 3.55% higher but hasn’t yet cleared the highs of the bear flag which lurk at 1,131 but so far the initial decline from 2010 highs has honored Fibonacci retracements

($SPX)

via StockCharts.com

In support, the NYSE Summation Index looks to have flinched and jumped early. A stochastic ‘buy’ is undermined by the lack of the oversold condition in the index itself. 

($NYSI)

via StockCharts.com

The only S&P breadth indicator to confirm a bottom (so far) is the S&P Percent of Stocks Above the 50-d MA. It has jumped from a low of 5.4% to 66.0% in a number of weeks.

($SPXA50R)

via StockCharts.com

The Nasdaq has pulled further away from its head-and-shoulder reversal neckline but it hasn’t yet reached an oversold condition.

Nasdaq

via StockCharts.com

The Percentage of Nasdaq stocks above the 50-day MA matched its S&P cousin with a confirmed ‘buy’ signal.
($NAA50R)

via StockCharts.com

So while the S&P and Nasdaq are pointing more towards a bottom they are not fully confirmed – yet.  





All About Trends Subscriber Weekend Newsletter

All About Trends Subscriber Weekend Newsletter

Courtesy of David at All About Trends 

Friday we said:

So what if the market goes to 1131? 

First off we have to get through the 200-day moving average at 1113 which is just a futures related pop at the open on Monday away. By the way these futures related pops at the open are what causes negative RS divergence because there really isn’t any strength per say just an adjustment in price from the prior close via the pop.

Notice the Full Stoh’s are right back to being up where they were every other time we were in the zone for a turn around?

Secondly look at where the 200 day moving average is (1113). Then the 50% fibonacci retracement level off the April highs to July lows is at 1114 too as shown in the chart below.  This makes for some headwinds to overcome IF we are plowing higher. 

And lastly the red line is the SPIKE HIGH of 1131. We emphasize the spike high of 1131 because it wasn’t there long and the market started giving it back. 

So now we’ve got some decent resistance levels just overhead.

Zooming in to a different time frame and frequency we see a closer view of this recent push off the July lows.

Here too Full Stohcastics are right back up into the overbought territory which makes us pause.  We’re not going to get cute on the longside here. Sure, we may have to deal with a little inflight turbulence but that ought to be nothing new as we’ve been here before and will be here again during our trading careers.

You can also see that we broke the red downtrend channel to the upside but we’ve already talked about that being a possibility last week.  Another interesting point is the ABC up swing we’ve just seen (on negative RS divergence we might add). This also makes it time for our favorite question: 

Is it going to be a 3 waves up affair and that’s it? If so, ABC123 is currently showing and we are there in the zone.

OR 

Is it going to be 5 waves up to the…
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My Life as a White-Collar Criminal

My Life as a White-Collar Criminal

Courtesy of Sam Antar at White Collar Fraud 

Last Friday evening, Marcia MacMillan from CTV News Channel (a 24-hour news network in Canada) interviewed me and asked me what it’s like to be a white-collar criminal and what role, if any, did morality play in my decisions to commit crime.  

You can watch the interview by clicking on this link.

Reflecting on my own white-collar criminal mind leaves no doubt that money is not the only motivating force compelling hardcore criminals to commit crimes.  There was also a passion for the act, a sense of accomplishment, that made me enjoy committing my crimes. It is perhaps the same positive feelings of success that law-abiding citizens experience for a legitimate job well-done.  

To better understand the behavior of white-collar criminals, take morality out of the equation. During my years at Crazy Eddie, we never had a single conversation about the morality of our actions. We did not give a damn about right and wrong.

Hardcore criminals don’t question their unethical and immoral conduct.  Laws, morality, and ethics are weaknesses of other people. They don’t factor in except by limiting society’s behavior. In our society, morality dictates that people are entitled to the benefit of the doubt. Ironically, the “benefit of a doubt” limits the behavior of law-abiding citizens while giving criminals greater opportunity to commit their crimes.  After all, no one likes to be called "a paranoid" or "impolite."  

Our late President Ronald Reagan used to say "trust, but verify." That initial trust gives criminals the freedom to take steps to evade detection.  For example, Joseph T. Wells, founder of the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, described certain steps I took during Crazy Eddie’s audit to successfully execute my crimes: 

Crazy Eddie’s auditors were provided a company office during their examination. They had a key to lock the desk—which they kept in a box of paperclips on top of the desk in full view. After the auditors left for the day, Eddie’s cohorts would unlock the desk, increase the inventory counts on the work-papers and photocopy the altered records. Were the auditors stupid? No, just too trusting. After all, no one wants to think the client is a crook. But it happens all too often. That’s why the profession requires auditors to be skeptical. 

I took advantage of our auditor’s initial trust of management and rigged…
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Investor Sentiment: I Am a Squirrel

Courtesy of thetechnicaltake

 

Glenn Holderreed of Quacera Capital Management and the QPM Radar sent me an email the other day describing the market:

 “Charting this market is similar to tracking the moves of a squirrel crossing a busy street. Quickly moving to the middle, no better turn back, no, no, I can make it across, oh no I better go back, shucks I can make it across. Sometimes they make it, but many get flattened. I think there are a few flattened in this market.”

{To view larger images just click on the graphs}

 

Investor Sentiment 7.25.10





LBMA Closes Off Public Access To Key Bullion Bank Trading Data

Courtesy of Tyler Durden

Is something (abnormally) fishy in the state of precious metals manipulation? GATA’s Adrian Douglas (recently famous for facilitating the emergence of whistleblower Andrew Maguire) seems to think so, after his observation that the LBMA has decided to block “access to statistics relating to the trading activities of its member bullion banks. This information has been available to the public since 1997 but as of this week it is available only to LBMA members.” His conclusion: “There is a cover-up of back-door injections of liquidity of physical gold, and the LBMA now is trying to conceal trading information. I interpret the LBMA’s move to secrecy as a sign that the opportunity to get real metal is closing fast.” Read on for his argument…

From GATA’s Adrian Douglas

The LBMA joins the gold squeeze cover-up, via GATA

The London Bullion Market Association has just taken the highly unusual step of blocking access to statistics relating to the trading activities of its member bullion banks. This information has been available to the public since 1997 but as of this week it is available only to LBMA members. (See http://www.lbma.org.uk.)

I have recently written a series of exposes of the LBMA (see References 1-4 below) using the association’s own data to show that the LBMA’s bullion banks are operating on a “fractional reserve” basis. My analysis indicates that the bullion banks are holding only 1 real ounce for about every 45 ounces of gold that they have sold, a reserve ratio of just 2.3 percent

At the March 25 public hearing of the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission on precious metals futures markets I cited the LBMA’s own statistics to label the “unallocated gold” accounts of the bullion banks as a Ponzi scheme. (See Reference 3 below.) There were bullion bank representatives at the hearing but no one expressed an objection. That hearing was videotaped and posted at the CFTC’s Internet site but the bullion banks have not made any public statement rebutting what I said. In fact at that hearing Jeffrey Christian, CEO of the CPM Group, acknowledged that what is widely called the “physical market” is in reality a largely “paper market” trading gold and silver as if they are financial assets and not physical metals. Christian stated that 100 ounces of paper gold are traded for every 1 ounce of physical…
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Zero Hedge

SNB Spent $68 Billion On Currency Manipulation In 2016

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

While Donald Trump has repeatedly expressed his displeasure with China for manipulating its currency, he appears to have recently figured out that over the past 2 years Beijing has been spending hundreds of billions in dollar to strengthen, not weaken, the Yuan and to halt the ~$1 trillion in capital flight from China. But while everyone knows that the biggest currency manipulation in the world, and perhaps the Milky Way galaxy is Japan, which now owns 40% of all JGBs in its ongoing attempt to pressure the Yen lower and explains why Abe was trembling when he met with Trump, terrified the US president would tell him to stop, one...



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ValueWalk

Why Things Aren't What They Used To Be In Emerging Markets

By Franklin Templeton Investments. Originally published at ValueWalk.

The prospect of stabilizing commodity prices and improving corporate earnings has helped rebuild investor interest in emerging markets over the past year. But returning investors may find the constituents of today’s emerging markets are very different from those of the past. I’ve invited my colleague Carlos Hardenberg to share some of his experiences of how emerging markets are not just emerging but evolving, too.

Carlos Hardenberg

Senior Vice President and Managing Director

Templeton Emerging Markets Group

When we look at the emerging-market companies in which we invest today, they are worlds away from the companies we were analysing a decade or two ago.

The landscape of emerging-market corporations in ...



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Phil's Favorites

QOTD: The WSJ Unloads on "Fake President"

 

QOTD: The WSJ Unloads on “Fake President”

Courtesy of 

If President Trump announces that North Korea launched a missile that landed within 100 miles of Hawaii, would most Americans believe him? Would the rest of the world? We’re not sure, which speaks to the damage that Mr. Trump is doing to his Presidency with his seemingly endless stream of exaggerations, evidence-free accusations, implausible denials and other falsehoods.

A President’s Credibility (The Wall Street Journal)

...

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Kimble Charting Solutions

Gold Bugs; Stellar performance stage set again

Courtesy of Chris Kimble.

From 2001 to 2011, would you have rather owned the S&P 500 or Gold Miners (Gold Bugs Index/HUI)? If you answered the Gold Bugs index, you would be correct. The left chart below compares the performance of the Gold Bugs Index and the S&P 500. From 2001 to 2011, the Gold Bugs index out performed the S&P 500 by 1,400% (left chart below).

Since 2011, miners have been weaker than the S&P 500 by a large percent. Could the stage be for another period where the mining stocks are going to be stronger than the broad markets again?

...

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Market News

News You Can Use From Phil's Stock World

 

Financial Markets and Economy

U.K. Retail Sales Rebound in February Amid Gloomy Quarter (Bloomberg)

U.K. retail sales rose more strongly than expected in February but the outlook for the British consumer remains weak.

European Stocks Hold Steady as Gain by Miners Offsets Food, Tech (Bloomberg)

European stocks were little changed, with advances in mining companies countering declines in food and beverage producers.

...



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Chart School

Semiconductors Recover at 20-day MA

Courtesy of Declan.

Yesterday's selling didn't follow through with additional losses, instead, indices dug in at lows and managed to recover some of yesterday's selloff.  The best recovery came from the Semiconductor Index. It gained over 1% as it bounced off its 20-day MA. However, it wasn't enough to stop a 'sell' trigger in the MACD and CCI.


Next is the Nasdaq 100. It staged a recovery, but not from a typical support level. Unfortunately, it has a MACD trigger 'sell' from early March and a new 'sell' trigger between the -DI an...

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Members' Corner

Natterings

Check out some new posts from our friend The Nattering Naybob. 

The Big Lebowski Sequel?

Taking a "resp-shit" or "potty break" from "in the Toilet Thursday" or "Thursday's in the Loo"... One of our favorite scenes from the 1998 cult classic The Big Lebowski, the ash can scene where Walter Subchak (John Goodman) eulogizes the departed Donnie (Steve Buscemi) with Jeffrey Lebowski (Jeff Bridges) looking on.

Keep reading: ...



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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of March 20th, 2017

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Digital Currencies

Bitcoin Tumbles Below Gold As China Tightens Regulations

Courtesy of Zero Hedge

Having rebounded rapidly from the ETF-decision disappointment, Bitcoin suffered another major setback overnight as Chinese regulators are circulating new guidelines that, if enacted, would require exchanges to verify the identity of clients and adhere to banking regulations.

A New York startup called Chainalysis estimated that roughly $2 billion of bitcoin moved out of China in 2016.

As The Wall Street Journal reports, the move to regulate bitcoin exchanges brings assurance that Chinese authorities will tolerate some level of trading, after months of uncertainty. A draft of the guidelines also indicates th...



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Mapping The Market

Congress begins rolling back Obama's broadband privacy rules

Courtesy of Jean Luc

I am trying to remember who on this board said that people wanted to Trump because they want their freedom back. Well….

Congress begins rolling back Obama's broadband privacy rules

By Daniel Cooper, Endgadget

ISPs will soon be able to sell your most private data without your consent.

As expected, Republicans in Congress have begun the process of rolling back the FCC's broadband privacy rules which prevent excessive surveillance. Arizona Republican Jeff Flake introduced a resolution to scrub the rules, using Congress' powers to invalidate recently-approved federal regulations. Reuters reports that the move has broad support, with 34 other names throwing their weight behind the res...



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Promotions

Free eBook - "My Top Strategies for 2017"

 

 

Here's a free ebook for you to check out! 

Phil has a chapter in a newly-released eBook that we think you’ll enjoy.

In My Top Strategies for 2017, Phil's chapter is Secret Santa’s Inflation Hedges for 2017.

This chapter isn’t about risk or leverage. Phil present a few smart, practical ideas you can use as a hedge against inflation as well as hedging strategies designed to assist you in staying ahead of the markets.

Some other great content in this free eBook includes:

 

·       How 2017 Will Affect Oil, the US Dollar and the European Union

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Biotech

The Medicines Company: Insider Buying

Reminder: Pharmboy and Ilene are available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

I'm seeing huge insider buying in the biotech company The Medicines Company (MDCO). The price has already moved up around 7%, but these buys are significant, in the millions of dollars range. ~ Ilene

 

 

 

Insider transaction table and buying vs. selling graphic above from insidercow.com.

Chart below from Yahoo.com

...

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All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: Harlan is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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FeedTheBull - Top Stock market and Finance Sites



About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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