Archive for 2010

Few Surprises As Greece’s Economic Contraction Accelerates

Few Surprises As Greece’s Economic Contraction Accelerates

Courtesy of Edward Hugh at Credit Writedowns 

Greece Travel

Edward Hugh here.

Well, I may say there were no surprises, but in fact the Greek economy contracted more than many observers expected in the fourth quarter, while downward revisions to the rest of 2009 converted the present recession into the country’s worst since 1987. Evidently the latest numbers offer the first warning that all may not be as simple as it looks on paper for the Greek government’s plan to set their finances straight. As far as I am concerned the latest numbers simply confirm what should already have been abundantly evident – correcting the fiscal deficit without straightening out the rest of the economic distortions is going to make economic growth something which is very hard to come by.

Accelerating Contraction

According to the Greek National Statistics Office gross domestic product contracted by 0.8 percent in the fourth quarter, significantly more than the 0.5 percent drop forecast in a Reuters survey of economists. The data clearly reveal that Greece’s downturn actually picked up speed from a revised 0.5 percent in the third quarter, casting doubt over government estimates of a return to growth in the second part of this year, and raising yet more issues about the evolution of the debt to GDP ratio. [Click on charts to enlarge.]

On a year-on-year basis, the economy shrank 2.6 percent in the fourth quarter following a revised fall of 2.5 percent in the third. The sweeping data revision showed Greek GDP contracted by 2 percent in 2009 as a whole, considerably more than the government’s earlier 1.2 percent estimate, making for the worst annual performance in nearly 30 years.

The latest batch of data changes only serve to further undermine the government’s already badly dented statistical credibility, even if the Greeks are far from being alone in carrying out this type of revision. But it is the scale of the revisions which is so striking in the Greek case – GDP shrank, for example, by a quarter-on-quarter 1 percent in the first quarter of last year: twice the earlier estimate, and the sharpest quarterly contraction since 2005. In the second quarter, GDP fell 0.3 percent, compared with an earlier estimate of a 0.1 percent, while third-quarter GDP shrank 0.5 percent revised from the earlier estimate of 0.4 percent. Rather than leaving the impression that…
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Web Video FIVE Years After YouTube…Meh!

Web Video FIVE Years After YouTube…Meh!

Courtesy of Howard Lindzon 

The hottest thing in web video in the 5 years since Youtube was launched is a site I am too scared to log into…

I am not sure if that is good or bad.

It seems longer, but YouTube is now 5 years old .

The Russian YOOT who started today’s hottest site – ChatRoulette – is only 17 years of age. Fred has some more stats and links about the kid and his site .

You may have your opinions about web video, but two numbers matter to me…5 (age of YouTube) and 17 (age of chatroulette founder). If you think we are anywhere but inning two, you just can’t handle the truth.

This industry is so young and moving so fast that my own Wallstrip seems like 50 years ago. In fact, our very first show was only 3.5 years ago (makes sense that $AAPL was our first show in a show about stocks and trends):

 

With an industry this hot and this early, it seems surprising that there have been so few hits and so little on innovation (pre-rolls for christ sakes still).

Ashkan has a great series of posts on who, what, when, where, who and finally why so few are making money in the web video space .

I believe a lot of what Ashkan says is true and I also believe that Google’s $GOOG massive pay up for YouTube just threw off the whole industry.

I also believe enough time has passed that the next stage in web video is upon us. There will be more winners. The iPad won’t hurt things either.


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TECHNICAL OUTLOOK: MORE DOWNSIDE TO COME

TECHNICAL OUTLOOK: MORE DOWNSIDE TO COME

Courtesy of The Pragmatic Capitalist 

From Decision Point:

I think the big question for most market participants is whether or not the market is putting in a medium-term bottom. The evidence is truly mixed, and I can make a case for either side of the argument; however, we have sell signals on both the daily and weekly charts, so, for now I think I will focus on the evidence supporting a further decline.

On the chart below you can see that last week there was a sharp two-day decline that found support on the 200-EMA, and formed an inverted flag pole. This week, prices trended upward in a narrow range, forming a flag at the end of the flag pole. A flag formation pointing upward is bullish. Pointing downward (inverted), it is bearish. In this case the implications are only short-term, with a possible downside to the area of 1020.

100212 cspot 1 TECHNICAL OUTLOOK: MORE DOWNSIDE TO COME

The On-Balance Volume (OBV) suite of charts below gives both side of the argument, but first let’s concentrate on the CVI (Climatic Volume Oscillator). It has become fairly overbought, and it topped on Friday. Combined with the inverted flag, it presents a negative short-term picture.

The VTO (Volume Trend Oscillator) is a medium-term indicator, and it has formed a double bottom in oversold territory. This is fairly strong evidence that a medium-term bottom is near, and quite a few of our other medium-term indicators are in agreement.

100212 cspot 2 TECHNICAL OUTLOOK: MORE DOWNSIDE TO COME

As I said, the evidence is mixed, and it is one of those times that we need to rely on the Thrust/Trend Model (T/TM) to keep a level head. Currently in a neutral posture, to generate a buy signal it will need for the PMO (Price Momentum Oscillator) and the PBI (Percent Buy Index) to cross up through their EMAs.

100212 cspot 4 TECHNICAL OUTLOOK: MORE DOWNSIDE TO COME

Bottom Line: Prices are in a down trend, the T/TM is in neutral, and an inverted flag combined with overbought short-term indicators suggest more downside yet to come. If the S&P 500 suddenly breaks UP from the inverted flag, I would change my short-term outlook from bearish to neutral, and await a new buy signal from the T/TM.





Offshore Oil The Warren Buffett Way

Courtesy of asiablues

By Economic Forecasts & Opinions

Commodities, particularly crude, were trending down last week after China’s Central Bank raised bank reserve requirements boosting the US dollar against other major currencies. That marks the second time China has raised its bank reserve requirement in a month.

Ongoing worries about the economy stemming from European debt problems, specifically the lack of a firm Greek bailout plan from European leaders also prompted investors moving out of risky assets. Crude oil fell for the first day in five to below $75 a barrel also partly due to government data showing U.S. inventories rose more than forecast.

Meanwhile U.S. natural gas registered the largest one-day gain last Friday to $5.48 per mmbtu since the beginning of the month on a drop in jobless claims, signaling industrial demand is likely improving, and cold temperatures across the US are boosting residential demand. Industrial Demand accounts for 29% of U.S. consumption.

Oil Services Sector Bottoming Out

While the markets are in a finicky mood from the China and Greek factors, the return of relative stability in oil and natural gas prices has spurred producers to increase their capital budget and restart projects they slowed down or completely deferred a year ago. (Fig. 1)

Absorbing the impact of lower rig counts, weak global demand for fossil fuel and volatile energy prices, the majority of the oil services companies are reporting sharply lower earnings in Q1. However, the rising rig count and producers’ capital budget suggest that oil service markets are probably in the process of bottoming this year, which suggests a good entry point for long-term investors. (Fig. 2)

 
Oil Majors Go Deepwater & Subsea

Roughly from 2004 to 2008, the onshore, North America in particular, had outshined the offshore in terms of activity growth. But the Great Recession has shifted the tide towards offshore and international. Offshore is one of the few remaining places where the state as well as western oil majors can increase production, while emerging Asian demand is expected to outpace the U.S. and the OECD in coming years.

FBR estimates an increase in deepwater spending of almost triple expected growth in onshore spending will drive offshore spending overall at…
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Hugh Hendry: Here Are Four Reasons China Will Start Sucking Wind

For an enjoyable, hour long video version of Hugh’s thoughts (among those of others), click here.

Hugh Hendry: Here Are Four Reasons China Will Start Sucking Wind

By Courtney Comstock, courtesy of Clusterstock 

hugh-hendry-on-newsnight

hugh-hendry-on-newsnight

Source: screen shot from you tube

People are way too psyched about China, says Hugh Hendry.

In a piece he wrote for the Telegraph, the hedge fund manager admits that China has been growing like crazy.

  • China’s conomic growth has averaged 9% a year over the past 10 years, compared with 1.9% for the British economy.
  • Last year, despite the credit crunch, China posted a remarkable growth rate of 10.7% compared with a British contraction of 3.2%

But here’s why China is not that great, according to Hendry:

  • China, now the world’s biggest creditor, is also running persistent trade surpluses. That’s only happened twice before: with the US economy in the 1920s and with the Japanese economy in the 1980s.
  • Unlike in most countries, China’s share of consumption within its economy has fallen relentlessly, reaching 35% of GDP in 2008.
  • Foreign demand for its exports dropped. Now China relies on a massive surge in domestic bank lending to fuel its growth rate.
  • China’s state planners have favored investment over consumption. China’s investment spending has tripled since 2001. Domestic consumption never grows fast enough to absorb the supply, and Chinese profitability is already low.

Read Hugh Hendry’s full article in the Telegraph >

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Greece Paid Goldman $300 Million To Help It Hide Its Ballooning Debts

Greece Paid Goldman $300 Million To Help It Hide Its Ballooning Debts

Courtesy of Henry Blodget at Clusterstock/Business Insider 

Building Collapse

The news that Goldman and other banks got paid hundreds of millions of dollars to help Greece hide its huge debts from the EU overseers has now gone mainstream. 

Louise Story, Landon Thomas, and Nelson Schwartz at the NYT:

In 2001, just after Greece was admitted to Europe’s monetary union, Goldman helped the government quietly borrow billions, people familiar with the transaction said. That deal, hidden from public view because it was treated as a currency trade rather than a loan, helped Athens to meet Europe’s deficit rules while continuing to spend beyond its means…

Instruments developed by Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase and a wide range of other banks enabled politicians to mask additional borrowing in Greece, Italy and possibly elsewhere.

In dozens of deals across the Continent, banks provided cash upfront in return for government payments in the future, with those liabilities then left off the books. Greece, for example, traded away the rights to airport fees and lottery proceeds in years to come.

[Greece paid Goldman] about $300 million in fees for arranging the 2001 transaction, according to several bankers familiar with the deal.

In other words, Greece was just like many American homeowners, who hit their home-equity ATMs every year to remodel their kitchens and buy SUVs they couldn’t afford.  And Goldman, et al, were just like WaMu and Countrywide.

It was all perfectly legal, of course.

 

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Austerity or Money Printing?

Austerity or Money Printing?

Courtesy of Chris Martenson

New 1996 Currency Security Upgrade

I was asked to write a once-a-month Market Observation for Financial Sense.  Here’s the first one (posted today, Feb 10): 

From time to time, I think it’s a good idea to stop squinting at the short-term market wiggles and pull our heads back for a wide-angle view.  Now would be a good time, so that’s what we’re going to do. For the record, I also happen to believe that close-up market analysis loses some of its potency during times of immense official intervention.  As with any subsidy program, prices become distorted and often fail to tell the real story, which is absolutely true with respect to interest rates and, by extension, the risk premium for stocks.

Back to the story.  Where the current crisis has been described using millions of words in thousands of articles packed with arcane acronyms (such as TALF, CDO, and CMBS), perplexing regulatory lapses and with a degree of complexity that dwarfs the Apollo moon mission, I can explain why the whole thing happened using just three words.

Too.  Much.  Debt.

Total credit market debt in the US doubled between 2000 and 2008, while incomes stagnated and jobs were not created.

When your debts are skyrocketing, but your means of servicing those debts are not, you are on a path to a credit crisis.  And that’s exactly what we got.

That’s all there is to it, and we’d have a better shot of crafting an enduring recovery if we better understood the difference between causes and symptoms.  Too much debt was the cause; virtually everything else was either a symptom or a contributory factor.  The main contributory factor was Alan Greenspan’s monkeying around with interest rates between 2002 and 2004 to create ultra-cheap money to fight the effects of his prior monetary and regulatory mistakes.

Which entirely explains why I am so dismissive of world efforts to stoke an economic recovery by deploying even cheaper money and even more debt.  As earnest as these efforts are, they spring from the very same flawed thinking and practices that got us into the mess in the first place.  Plus, they’ve never worked before.

I’ve analyzed this situation nearly to death, and I arrive at this one very simple conclusion:  The US is insolvent (and so are many other governments around the world).

We all know the…
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1968 and 1980: Republicans, Democrats and Debt

1968 and 1980: Republicans, Democrats and Debt  

Courtesy of Charles Hugh Smith, Of Two Minds 

Democrats in 1968 and Republicans in 1980 shared the same game plan: guns and butter, paid for by immense borrowing.

About the only benefit of being a political junkie is being able to recall events and contexts which have been lost to all but history majors. To bypass the tiresome partisan "debate" (is a dog chasing its tail a "debate"?) over "who’s to blame for everything going to heck, Obama or Bush," let’s place the last 9 years in context by glancing at a few charts.

Here is a chart of Federal spending starting with the Republican Era of "small government" in 1980. Though it may seem to the casual observer that the Republican reign was interrupted by 8 years of Clinton, this would be a grave misunderstanding. Yes, the political labels of "Democrat" and "Republican" were switched on the White House, but the underlying "move to the center" via championing smaller central government continued uninterrupted during the Clinton era.

Indeed, Clinton reduced the Federal head count and reformed Federal welfare programs far more successfully than any Republican.

But what this chart makes abundantly clear is what a travesty of a sham it is for either party to claim the crown of "small government:" Federal budgets have exploded in a 25-year long era of low inflation and declining interest rates.

If the Republicans were serious about "small government," there is scant evidence of it here, even when they controlled the White House and Congress.

Next up: the famous chart of total U.S. debt measured in GDP:

The left-hand spike is the Great Depression: debt did not skyrocket during the GD, GDP collapsed, driving the ratio of debt to GDP into a spike. Let’s look at a clearer snapshot of the same data:

Note the tiny blip created by massive Federal borrowing and spending to fund a global war--World War II. As GDP exploded upward with the stupendous war effort, the actual rise in debt vis a vis GDP was modest indeed.

This gives the lie to the Keynesian argument that borrowing trillions of dollars now is perfectly sustainable and right because it "worked" in 1942-45. Borrowing trillions (in today’s dollars) "worked" because GDP skyrocketed along with the debt. But now, we as…
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Put This Kiss On Your List

Put This Kiss On Your List

By David Grandey

All About Trends

For the week, the S&P 500 managed to eek out a gain of .9% but boy oh boy you sure wouldn’t have thought that. 3 out of the last 4 days, the S&P 500 has had 20 point mood swings with the Dow showing 150 point plus mood swings with the OTC being the stronger of the two but none the less net nowhere for 3 weeks.

Over the last few weeks you’ve heard us talk about how the OTC leads and sure enough one look at the charts below shows that of the OTC leading relative to the S&P 500 and Dow. 

mail.jpg

 

While the S&P 500 and the Dow are still locked in down channels the OTC has broke above it. So does that mean that the S&P 500 and Dow have to play catch up to it? Not necessarily because if the OTC breaks to the downside the S&P 500 and Dow are going along for the ride. One look at the OTC Comp. chart above also shows us tracing out the exact same pattern we have embedded in the chart above that we brought to your attention a few weeks ago and here we are just like clockwork.

Ok all that aside what else do we see going on in the chart above?

A classic 5 waves down of 1(A), then a 3 waves up (abc) of a potential Wave 2 (B). Right up to the 38.2% Fibonacci level too I might add. So we’ve got confluence here and the minimum requirements for an abc being completed. From here all you need to know is that Pink line, a break of it to the downside sets in motion one of three things.

1. A morph of the pattern
2. A retest of the lows if not more.
3. The start of the C wave down to the 200 day average.

Don’t understand Elliott Wave? Well that’s fine too. We’ll make it real simple for you in the charts below. All you need to know can be found in the Pink lines below. A downside break of them gets the ball rolling to the downside.

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Lastly here for…
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Sunday Funnies

Mish Sunday Funnies 2010-02-14 American Idle

Courtesy of Mish 

Cartoon written for Mish by Lambert-King
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Mike "Mish" Shedlock
 

TIME Cartoons of the Week

Courtesy of TIME 

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By Op-Toons Review:

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Chart School

Richmond Fed: Manufacturing Activity Weakens in June

Courtesy of Doug Short's Advisor Perspectives.

Today the Richmond Fed Manufacturing Composite Index fell 6 points to -7 from last month's -1. Investing.com had forecast 2. Because of the highly volatile nature of this index, we include a 3-month moving average to facilitate the identification of trends, now at 2, still indicating expansion. The complete data series behind today's Richmond Fed manufacturing report (available here), which dates from November 1993.

Here is a snapshot of the complete Richmond Fed Manufacturing Composite series.

...



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Phil's Favorites

The Market's Response To Crisis

 

The Market’s Response To Crisis

Courtesy of 

The most important thing long-term investors need to see today is the market’s response to crisis, courtesy of Dimensional Funds.

The chart above should put the Brexit in perspective. Nobody knows yet what the implications will be, but I’m pretty confident that this is no more significant than any of the six events above. Now of course there are never any guarantees, that’s what risk means. And if you need the money in the next five years, you should not b...



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Zero Hedge

Richmond Fed Dead-Cat-Bounce Crashes To 3-Year Lows

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

With the biggest miss in two years, Richmond Fed collapsed to -7 (lowest since Jan 2013) from March's 22 print (six year highs). The farcical flip-flop leaves the average workweek plunging into contraction, number of employees dropping, New Order volume crashing, and worse still, future expectations of hisring and work week is plunging.

Best in 6 years to worst in over 3 years...

As New orders crash

...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

London closer to breakout, than breakdown- Really???

Courtesy of Chris Kimble.

While the media is focused on the noise around Brexit, yesterday the Power of the Pattern shared that Germany (DAX) and London (FTSE) remained above 6-year rising support. See post HERE.

Below takes a closer look at the FTSE index in London, the so called center of the news noise.

CLICK ON CHART TO ENLARGE

...

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ValueWalk

Bill Gross on 'What'd You Miss'

By Jacob Wolinsky. Originally published at ValueWalk.

Bill Gross on ‘What’d You Miss'”>Bill Gross on ‘What’d You Miss’

Streamed live 5 hours ago
Today on ‘What’d You Miss,’ co-hosts Scarlet Fu & Alix Steel bring you live coverage of the market close and talk to Standard & Poor’s Chief Global Economist Paul Sheard about the G7 meeting. We’ll also bring you Erik Schatzker’s interview with Bill Gross, live from FI16 in Los Angeles (http://la.bbgfi16.com/). We’ll hear from the bond king on central bank policy and his outlook for global growth.

‘What’d You Miss’ with Alix Steel, Scarlet Fu, and Joe Weisenthal airs every weekday on Bloomberg TV from 4 – 5 pm ET:

The post ...



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Market News

News You Can Use From Phil's Stock World

 

Financial Markets and Economy

Worlds Top Fortunes Fall $196.2 Billion Since Brexit Bombshell (Bloomberg)

Global markets erased another $69.2 billion from the combined net worth of the worlds 400 richest people Monday, bringing the total since the U.K. shocked investors with a vote to leave the European Union to $196.2 billion in the last two trading days.

Global stocks extend l...



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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - Week of June 27th, 2016

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Mapping The Market

Thoughts on Brexit

I have mixed feelings about Brexit today. Clearly the European institution need reforming. The addition of so many countries in the last 20 years has created a top heavy administration. The Euro adds more complexities to the equation as the ECB policies cannot fit every country's problem. On the other hand, a unified Europe has advantages as well – some countries have benefited from the integration.

For Britain, it's hard to say what the final price will be. My guess is that Scotland might now vote for independence as they supported staying in Europe overwhelmingly. Northern Ireland might be tempted to leave as well so possibly RIP UK in the long run. I was talking to some French people and they were saying that now there might be no incentive for France to stop immigrants from crossing over to the UK like they do now and simply allow for travel there and let the UK deal with them. The end game is not clear to anyone at the moment....



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Digital Currencies

Bitcoin Tumbles 10%

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

One week ago, when bitcoin first crossed above $700 on the seemingly insatiable Chinese buying which we forecast last September (when bitcoin was trading at $230) would take place as a result of China's capital controls (to much pushback by the "mainstream" financial media), we tried to predict what may happen next. We said that "it could go much higher. That said, anyone who bought last September when the digital currency was trading at $230 may be advised to take some profits, and at least make...



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All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: Harlan is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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Biotech

This Is Why Biotech Stocks May Explode Again

Reminder: Pharmboy and Ilene are available to chat with Members.

Here's an interesting article from Investor's Business Daily arguing that biotech stocks are beginning to recover from their recent declines, notwithstanding current weakness.

This Is Why Biotech Stocks May Explode Again

By 

Excerpt:

After a three-year bull run that more than quadrupled its value by its peak last July, IBD’s Medical-Biomed/Biotech Industry Group plunged 50% by early February, hurt by backlashes against high drug prices and mergers that seek to lower corporate taxes.

...



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We know you love coming here for our Stocks & Options education, strategy and trade ideas, and for Phil's daily commentary which you can't live without, but there's more!

PhilStockWorld.com features the most important and most interesting news items from around the web, all day, every day!

News: If you missed it, you can probably find it in our Market News section. We sift through piles of news so you don't have to.   

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Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

"Hello PSW Members –

This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743

Thank you for you time!




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