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Sector Detector: Bullish investors jockey for position as if the correction is over

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Scott MartindaleAs many investors enjoy the final weeks of summer, some optimistic bulls seem to be positioning themselves well ahead of Labor Day in anticipation of a fall rally. Indeed, last week’s action was impressive. After only a mere 4% correction, investors continued to brush off the disturbing violence both at home and abroad, and they took the minor pullback as their next buying opportunity. But was that really all the pullback we’re going to get this year? I doubt it. But I also believe that nothing short of a major Black Swan event can send this market into a deep correction.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

Looking at the ten U.S. business sectors, Technology, Utilities, and Healthcare each had a good week last week and are still the leaders year-to-date, while Energy fell back a tad. Notably, Basic Materials continues to show new life and is pulling away from the pack at the lower end of the performance scale — Industrial, Financial, Consumer Goods/Staples, Consumer Services/Discretionary, and Telecommunications.

U.S. Treasuries continue to enjoy strong demand, even while the Fed continues to taper its bond buying activity. The 10-year yield fell even further last week, closing Friday at 2.34%, and the 30-year last checked in at 3.13%. Again, the strength in Treasuries is reflecting global investors seeking the relative safety of the U.S., given all the global turmoil, as well as an expectation that the Fed likely will not raise interest rates any time soon. Low rates entice business to borrow for expansion, hiring, and stock buybacks, and they support higher equity valuation multiples when low bond yields (and a low discount rate) are compared with future earnings in equities discounted back to a present value.

The CBOE Market Volatility Index (VIX), a.k.a. fear gauge, closed Friday at 13.15. During the recent market pullback, VIX had spiked above 17, but soon fell back to as low as 12 on Friday morning during the early continuation of the market rebound.…
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Sector Detector: August consolidation offers chance to buy top stocks from top sectors

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Stocks saw elevated volume and volatility last week, and the 100-day simple moving average on the S&P 500 proved to be the proverbial line-in-the-sand for bullish investors. I opined last week that the market seemed to have sufficiently cycled back down to oversold territory, so with a little more technical consolidation and successful testing of nearby support levels, the next move higher could easily commence at any time. So, the question remains as to whether that was the big new buying opportunity, or whether more backing-and-filling is needed. Personally, I would prefer to see a successful test of the 200-day SMA, but the market might not be so generous.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

U.S. Treasuries continue to enjoy strong demand. The 10-year yield fell even further this week, closing Friday at 2.42%. So, the bond market is telling us that the Fed will not raise interest rates in the near term. However, high-yield corporate bonds, which have enjoyed a multi-year bull run as income investors have taken on risk in search of higher yields, saw accelerated losses last week. According to Bank of America Merrill Lynch, total dollar outflows last week were the largest ever and the fourth largest as a percentage of AUM. So, all in all, bonds displayed risk-off activity, which of course should be no surprise.

Of course, overbought technical conditions combined with frightening geopolitical turmoil have made equity investors hesitant. And then there was the $100 billion in M&A that suddenly collapsed last Tuesday when the Twenty-First Century Fox (FOX) acquisition of Time Warner (TWX) and the Sprint (S) bid for T-Mobile US (TMUS) both fell apart. Nevertheless, M&A and stock buybacks remain robust — and are expected to continue as such.

And Friday saw quite a resumption in bullish sentiment, with green across the board. In fact, all 13 of Sabrient’s Baker’s Dozen top stocks for 2014 finished the day positive. Interestingly, the five leaders in the portfolio on Friday were those…
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Sector Detector: Patient bulls finally get a new entry point, thanks to inflation fears

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Now that’s what I’m talking about. I have been discussing the overbought technical conditions of the S&P 500 for some time and the need for a pullback to test bullish support levels. And as many commentators have suggested, the more time between pullbacks, the more severe is the action when it finally arrives. Bears had become very hungry after a prolonged hibernation. This week offered up a nasty pullback. But fear not, because in my view it was just what the doctor ordered for the bulls to recruit new troops in order to have a chance at breaking through some ominous resistance levels.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

Once Fed Chairwoman Yellen mentioned a little something about inflation, bulls got spooked, and of course a little fear at overbought levels can snowball in short order. The stock market is a discounting mechanism in that the theoretical fair value in a discounted cash flow model is the sum of future earnings discounted back to a present value. So, if inflation starts to creep up, there would be pressure on the Federal Reserve to increase the discount rate, which would make it harder to support elevated multiples. Moreover, it would make corporate borrowing for stock buybacks or capital investment less attractive. Thus, the kneejerk reaction. This further underscores the need for economic expansion and rising corporate earnings (as well as rising revenues) to support valuations. So far, earnings season has been pretty good, and of course Q2 GDP smoked all predictions by clocking in at a robust +4%, while the dismal Q1 rate was revised upward.

Wage inflation is the necessary precursor to price inflation, and reports showed that U.S. labor costs in Q2 recorded their biggest gain in more than five years. Argentina defaulting on its sovereign debt and increasingly severe sanctions on Russia didn’t help investor psyche, either. On Friday, unemployment ticked up to 6.2% (even though many observers thought it might drop below 6%), most likely due to…
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Sector Detector: Bold bulls dare meek bears to take another crack

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Scott MartindaleOnce again, stocks have shown some inkling of weakness. But every other time for almost three years running, the bears have failed to pile on and get a real correction in gear. Will this time be different? Bulls are almost daring them to try it, putting forth their best Dirty Harry impression: “Go ahead, make my day.” Despite weak or neutral charts and moderately bullish (at best) sector rankings, the trend is definitely on the side of the bulls, not to mention the bears’ neurotic skittishness about emerging into the sunlight.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

Several market commentators have noted that the S&P 500 has gone nearly three years without a 10% peak-to-trough correction, which is the third-longest stretch in 25 years. The bears are simply lacking both leadership and new recruits in this low volatility, global-central-bank-liquidity-supported bull market. Not even renowned hedge fund manager Bill Ackman has been able to smack down the one stock that he “will go to the end of the earth” to destroy — Herbalife (HLF). Nevertheless, Friday’s weakness was notable, even though stocks found support (at the 20-day simple moving average for the S&P 500, and the 200-day SMA for the Russell 2000).

Indeed, there is plenty of global turmoil to create a stout Wall of Worry. Israeli/Palestinian relations are at a new low as violence escalates. Elsewhere, Muslim extremists are creating war and anarchy all over the world, thumbing their noses at the notion of democracy, cooperation, and mutual respect. And then there’s Russia and its shameless push to reestablish hegemony over their former satellite nations (and perhaps take back a little land while they’re at it). But investors finally reacted Friday when European Council President Herman Van Rompuy suggested that new sanctions against Russia should target oil companies, which could create a boomerang effect on the global economy.

In earnings announcements last week, Facebook (FB) was a big winner while Amazon.com (AMZN) was a notable loser. According to FactSet,…
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Sector Detector: Bulls remain unfazed by borderline Black Swans

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Despite a highly eventful week in the news, not much has changed from a stock market perspective. No doubt, investors have grown immune to the daily reports of geopolitical turmoil, including Ukraine vs. Russia for control of the eastern regions, Japan’s dispute with China over territorial waters, Sunni vs. Shiite for control of Iraq, Christians being driven out by Islamists, and other religious conflicts in places like Nigeria and Central African Republic. But last Thursday’s news of the Malaysian airliner tragically getting shot down over Ukraine, coupled with Israel’s ground incursion into Gaza, had the makings of a potential Black Swan event, which in my view is the only thing that could derail the relentless bull march higher in stocks.

Nevertheless, when it became clear that the airliner catastrophe was most likely a mistake born of incompetence among the rag-tag rebels rather than the start of an orchestrated terrorist attack on the West, I fully expected a recovery on Friday, which we got. And so the upward march of stocks continues.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

Thursday’s brief scare gave the S&P 500 its first single-day decline of more than 1% in three months, while the CBOE Market Volatility Index (VIX) surged 32%, which was its biggest single-day percentage increase since April 2013. Moreover, NYSE volume increased 20% over its daily average for the month. Friday’s bounce saw the Dow Jones Industrials Index regain the 17,000 level, but the Wilshire 5000 Total Market Index was not able to get back above 21,000. Also, both the Dow and S&P 500 are encountering resistance as they re-approach their 52-week highs, and the Russell 2000 small caps are facing resistance from its 50-day simple moving average. I still think there may be more downside in store before summer is over.

Continued strength in U.S. stocks is being driven by expectations of continued low interest rates, a big jump in GDP growth, and improving corporate earnings. Indeed, all major central banks are…
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Sabrient Announces Staff Changes at Gradient

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Brent Miller, CFA, has been named president and chief operating officer of Gradient Analytics, a Sabrient subsidiary, among other staff changes. More





Sector Detector: Will earnings season provide the next catalyst for stocks?

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Scott MartindaleMore unnerving conflicts around the globe have flared up, but as usual, U.S. equity investors have given it nary a yawn as they seem to have become pretty much numb to the steady stream of unwelcome news, particularly out of the Middle East. Now we enter the summer version of earnings season. Although sell-side expectations have been reduced from the previous lofty forecasts coming out of the dismal Q1 numbers, we’ll see if earnings reports can catalyze a renewed bullish march higher, or a long-feared bearish correction, or perhaps a resumption of the sideways-to-upward summer consolidation that we have seen so far.

Going into Q2 earnings season, projections are for the strongest in several years due to resurgent GDP growth, the highest level of stock buybacks since 2007, and a weak U.S. dollar (while helps multinationals and commodity-oriented companies. Last week, Alcoa (AA) kicked off things with a strong report, which bodes well for the Industrial sector. This week, some of the biggest Technology sector companies will report, including Intel (INTC), Yahoo (YHOO), eBay (EBAY), and Google (GOOGL).

The other week, a patriotic pre-Independence Day holiday push took the Dow Jones Industrials Index above 17,000, the Wilshire 5000 Total Market Index above 21,000, and the S&P 500 to slightly above the upper trend line of its long-standing bullish ascending channel that has been in place for nearly three years. However, as I predicted last week, stocks lost their momentum in the post-holiday summer trading, and I still think there may be more downside in store before summer is over.

The Federal Reserve has signaled that October is likely to mark the end of their quant easing program, and eventually they will need to begin raising short-term rates and shrinking their balance sheet of those bonds they’ve accumulated. Nevertheless, the 10-year Treasury bond continues to remain strong with a low yield of 2.54%, which is back down to where it was a couple of weeks ago before a brief inflation scare nudged it up a smidge last week. Persistently low yields continue to push investors into equities in their search for both yield and total return. As unemployment drops, there eventually will be wage inflation pressures, which is a first step toward long-anticipated price inflation. So, it seems to many observers that there is greater risk in holding…
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Sector Detector: Summer slog likely to keep a lid on further stock gains

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Stock investors entered the Fourth of July holiday on a high note, pushing the Dow Jones Industrials Index above 17,000 and the Wilshire 5000 Total Market Index above 21,000, and even pushing the S&P 500 to a smidge above the upper trend line of its long-standing bullish ascending channel that has been in place for nearly three years. However, with the Independence Day cheer behind us, persistently overbought technical conditions, and two months of summer doldrums ahead until the Labor Day holiday, I don’t think stocks are likely to muster much in the way of further progress over the near term. This may give bears a chance to make their long-stymied move.  Although bulls should be able to maintain the upper hand in the longer term, I expect bears will finally have their window of opportunity to drive prices down (at least a little) before summer is over.

Last week I reported that among the ten U.S. business sectors, defensive and income-oriented Utilities displayed the best first-half performance. But last week was harsh on Utilities, allowing Energy to become the new leader, while Utilities fell into a virtual dead-heat with Healthcare and Technology for second place. Basic Materials also has shown good strength of late. This recent action might suggest some early signs of positioning for rising inflation and interest rates on the horizon.

Although the 10-year Treasury bond continues to remain strong with a low yield of 2.66%, this is actually a bit of a spike from the prior week’s close of 2.53%. Nevertheless, some top bond fund managers are still predicting that the 10-year yield could fall as low as 2.2% this year.

While the CPI is showing no signs of inflation, there’s no doubt that healthcare and housing costs are rising. But with the labor force participation rate on a downtrend and capacity utilization still relatively low, wage pressures and GDP will gradually rise. As a result, assuming the Fed starts raising interest rates by the end of next year, some (like Guggenheim Partners) are predicting 10-year Treasury yields to approach 4% over the next few years. Much of this capital should rotate into equities.

The CBOE Market Volatility Index (VIX), a.k.a. fear gauge, continues on its slow trek toward the depths of single digits, closing the short week on Thursday at 10.32.…
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Sector Detector: Mid-year mark finds eager bulls seeking renewed traction

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Scott MartindaleStocks continue to hold up like troopers even though bulls have lost some traction, perhaps due to a combination of the summer doldrums and overbought technical conditions that have them biding time until the next setup for a run at new highs. To be sure, bears are AWOL and missing their opportunity to create some fear and ignite a correction. So, with little in the way of a catalyst in either direction at the moment, bulls remain in the driver seat.

As we hit the mid-year mark this week, a few things are particularly notable. First almost everything is up at least a little bit, on a year-to-date basis. Gold began the year on a comeback tear, but hit a wall around mid-March and has floundered about since then. Still, after a June rally, gold is the top performing asset class year-to-date, up nearly +10%. U.S. large cap stocks (as measured by the S&P 500) are up more than +7%. Corporate bonds and NASDAQ stocks aren’t too far behind, followed by emerging markets and international developed markets. Even small caps (Russell 2000) staged a nice rally in June to get overall performance above +2%. Bringing up the rear are government bonds. But everything is positive.

The 10-year Treasury bond continues to confound many economists by holding up strong, with its yield languishing around 2.53%. Some experts are now predicting it to fall to as low as 2.2% in the second half of the year, which should continue to push income-hungry investors into dividend-paying equities.

Among the ten U.S. business sectors, income-oriented Utilities continues to display the best performance year-to-date, up about +15.5%, and REITs (which are also income-oriented) are right there with them. Energy has been quite strong recently, overtaking Healthcare for second place. Technology (which has consistently ranked at the top of our fundamentals-based sector rankings) has been coming on strong and gradually catching up with Healthcare, while Consumer Discretionary and Telecommunications (which have consistently ranked at the bottom of our rankings) are the worst performers year-to-date.

Moreover, the CBOE Market Volatility Index (VIX), a.k.a. fear gauge, continues to languish near its lows, closing Friday at 11.26. Again, some observers are predicting single digits for the VIX, while others insist that the extreme oversold conditions are ripe for reversion to the mean sometime this summer,…
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Sector Detector: Stocks cruise right along, whistling past the graveyard

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

U.S. stocks just continue to cruise right along, although investors seem to be displaying a healthy level of caution, looking over their shoulders as they whistle past the graveyard and bet on ongoing improvement in corporate earnings and economic growth. Despite extremely overbought technical conditions and regional hot spots that may ultimately threaten global economic recovery, investors seem undeterred. Indeed, all major central banks are now onboard the liquidity bandwagon, and although bonds have not sold off as many expected (to create a Great Rotation into equities), most income and total return-seeking investors in the U.S. see little in the way of attractive alternatives to equities.

The economic data continues to indicate improvement in the U.S. economy. For example, the number of job openings waiting to be filled in the United States rose in April by 289,000 to 4.5 million, which is the highest in nearly seven years. This bodes well for an imminent fall in the unemployment rate. Also, April retail sales were revised upward to +0.5%.

Furthermore, the global economy seems to have the wind at its back, thanks at least in part to central banks around the world providing a sea of liquidity by printing money. The scary side of this is that when the next recession eventually arises, all of these central banks will be low in ammunition to fight it. Nevertheless, for the near term, it seems that all is well for U.S. stocks, even though fears of a major crisis continue to push much of the global liquidity that is being printed into U.S. Treasuries in a flight to quality and safety. The 10-year Treasury yield remains quite low and may yet fall further.

With economies in Europe and the U.S. improving, China has been able to grow exports and expand its trade balance. In addition, China has enacted a number of policies to support the housing market and overall economic growth. All of this seems to have staved off the brewing crisis there.

Of course, there is no free lunch, and Iraq has again turned into a quagmire (perhaps predictably and inevitably, given its long history of Sunni/Shiite discord), replacing the Russian/Ukraine conflict as the hot spot that could ultimately pose real threats to global security, oil prices, and economic recovery. But a Wall of Worry is important to…
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Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

"Hello PSW Members –

This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743"

Thank you for you time!

 
 

All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: David is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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Zero Hedge

Ukraine: A Perspective From Europe

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by Alasdair Macleod via Peak Prosperity,

The eminent historian Niall Ferguson in an op-ed for the Financial Times (Friday August 1st) made a comparison between the events leading up to the start of WW1 and the Ukraine situation today. While the comparison is apposite given the 100-year anniversary of the former, these are very different times. The assassination of the successor to the Austria-Hungarian Empire in Sarajevo by anarchists was initially dismissed as a local difficulty in an obscure province, which had been annexed from the Ottoman Empire in 1906. While regrettable and unexpected to observers outside the Balkans there wa...



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Chart School

Getting Technical: Weekend Update

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Here's the latest weekend update from Serge Perreault, a Chartered Professional Accountant and market technician located near Montreal, Canada. Serge has been following the U.S. market in a series of weekly charts. Here is his update on the S&P 500.

This week, the S&P 500 broke above its previous record close by 3 points, on strong but near-resistance momentum and on below-average volume.

Click for a sharper image

Note: For newcomers to technical analysis, here are brief explanations for the two key indicators that S...



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Phil's Favorites

Spotlight on European Bank Lending: Capital Impairment to the Forefront

Courtesy of Mish.

As noted in German Two-Year Bonds Have Negative Yield, Demand High; Euro Bond Bubble Guaranteed to Burst, " Banks lend (provided they are not capital impaired), when credit-worthy borrowers want credit and banks perceive risks worth lending."

So which is it, lack of credit-worthy borrowers or capital impairment. The answer is likely both, but the spotlight goes on capital impairment, and Texas Ratios, a the ratio pf bad loans to equity.  

The New York Times DealBook explains Europe Fears Banks Lack Cash Cushion to Cover Bad Loans.
When t...



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Insider Scoop

Point72 Still Under A Cloud As President Plans To Step Down

Courtesy of Benzinga.

Related SPY 3 Reasons To Follow The Big Dog In Natural Resources Fed Issues FOMC Minutes from Jul. 29-30th, 2014 Meeting Dow 17K: A Story of Recovery, Perseverance (Fox Business)

Hedge fund giant Point72 Asset Management said its president, Thomas Conheeney, will step down at the end of 2014 and be succeeded by Douglas Haynes, managing director for human capital at Point72.

Formerly known as SAC Capital Advisors,...



http://www.insidercow.com/ more from Insider

Option Review

CME Group Put Options Active

Options volume on the provider of futures and options based on interest rates, equity indexes, foreign exchange, energy, agricultural commodities, metals and alternative investment products is well above average on Thursday morning, due in large part to a sizable put spread initiated in the 19Sep’14 expiry contracts. Shares in CME Group (Ticker: CME) are up slightly on the day, trading 0.25% higher at $74.34 as of the time of this writing.

The largest trade on CME today appears to be a bear put spread in which roughly 1,500 of the 19Sep’14 74.0 strike puts were purchased at a premium of $1.44 each against the sale of the same number of t...



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Sabrient

Sector Detector: Bullish investors jockey for position as if the correction is over

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

As many investors enjoy the final weeks of summer, some optimistic bulls seem to be positioning themselves well ahead of Labor Day in anticipation of a fall rally. Indeed, last week’s action was impressive. After only a mere 4% correction, investors continued to brush off the disturbing violence both at home and abroad, and they took the minor pullback as their next buying opportunity. But was that really all the pullback we’re going to get this year? I doubt it. But I also believe that nothing short of a major Black Swan event can send this market into a deep correction.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then ...



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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of August 18th, 2014

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Stock World Weekly

Stock World Weekly

Newsletter writers are available to chat with Members regarding topics presented in SWW, comments are found below each post.

The Stock World Weekly Newsletter is ready to go! View it here: Stock World Weekly. Just put in your user name and password, or take a free trial. 

 

#120692880 / gettyimages.com ...

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Market Shadows

Helen Davis Chaitman Reviews In Bed with Wall Street.

Author Helen Davis Chaitman is a nationally recognized litigator with a diverse trial practice in the areas of lender liability, bankruptcy, bank fraud, RICO, professional malpractice, trusts and estates, and white collar defense. In 1995, Ms. Chaitman was named one of the nation's top ten litigators by the National Law Journal for a jury verdict she obtained in an accountants' malpractice case. Ms. Chaitman is the author of The Law of Lender Liability (Warren, Gorham & Lamont 1990)... Since early 2009, Ms. Chaitman has been an outspoken advocate for investors in Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities LLC (more here).

Helen Davis Chaitman Reviews In Bed with Wall Street. 

By Helen Davis Chaitman   

I confess: Larry D...



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Digital Currencies

BitLicense Part 1 - Can Poorly Thought Out Regulation Drive the US Economy Back into the Dark Ages?

Courtesy of Reggie Middleton.

An Op-Ed piece penned by Veritaseum Chief Contracts Officer, Matt Bogosian

This past weekend (despite American Airlines' best efforts), Reggie and I made it to the Second Annual North American Bitcoin Conference in Chicago. While there were some very creative (and very ambitious) ideas on how to try to realize the disruptive Bitcoin protocol, one of the predominant topics of discussion was New York Superintendent of Financial Services Benjamin Lawsky's proposed Bitcoin regulations (the BitLicense proposal) - percieved by many participants at the event as an apparent ...



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Pharmboy

Biotechs & Bubbles

Reminder: Pharmboy is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Well PSW Subscribers....I am still here, barely.  From my last post a few months ago to now, nothing has changed much, but there are a few bargins out there that as investors, should be put on the watch list (again) and if so desired....buy a small amount.

First, the media is on a tear against biotechs/pharma, ripping companies for their drug prices.  Gilead's HepC drug, Sovaldi, is priced at $84K for the 12-week treatment.  Pundits were screaming bloody murder that it was a total rip off, but when one investigates the other drugs out there, and the consequences of not taking Sovaldi vs. another drug combinations, then things become clearer.  For instance, Olysio (JNJ) is about $66,000 for a 12-week treatment, but is approved for fewer types of patients AND...



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Promotions

See Live Demo Of This Google-Like Trade Algorithm

I just wanted to be sure you saw this.  There’s a ‘live’ training webinar this Thursday, March 27th at Noon or 9:00 pm ET.

If GOOGLE, the NSA, and Steve Jobs all got together in a room with the task of building a tremendously accurate trading algorithm… it wouldn’t just be any ordinary system… it’d be the greatest trading algorithm in the world.

Well, I hate to break it to you though… they never got around to building it, but my friends at Market Tamer did.

Follow this link to register for their training webinar where they’ll demonstrate the tested and proven Algorithm powered by the same technological principles that have made GOOGLE the #1 search engine on the planet!

And get this…had you done nothing b...



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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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