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Sector Detector: Holiday fever takes hold of stock investors, but a pullback is needed

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

With warmer weather arriving to melt the early snowfall across much of the country, investors seem to be catching a severe case of holiday fever and positioning themselves for the seasonally bullish time of the year. And to give an added boost, both Europe and Asia provided more fuel for the bull’s fire last week with stimulus announcements, particularly China’s interest rate cut. Yes, all systems are go for U.S. equities as there really is no other game in town. But nothing goes up in a straight line, not even during the holidays, so a near-term market pullback would be a healthy way to prevent a steeper correction in January.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

Last Friday brought a very nice opening pop to U.S. markets when China decided to cut its lending rate, making U.S. assets more attractive to global investors. Moreover, the ECB indicated its willingness to implement greater stimulus measures, including government bond purchases. Japan has slipped into recession with GDP decreasing by -1.6% in Q3 versus expectations of +2.2%. And Germany only expanded by a paltry +0.1%. The euro fell to near 2-year lows versus the U.S. dollar, while the yen fell to new 7-year lows against the dollar.

The combination of economic weakness in these major global economies and increasing U.S. oil production continues to push down the price of oil, and the resulting wealth effect of rising equity prices and low gasoline prices is expected to create a boon for retailers this holiday season. Adding to the seasonal strength for stocks is that corporations tend to do much of their buybacks this time of the year. Also, elevated short interest can provide yet another short-term catalyst.

M&A activity is another catalyst, and last week Allergan (AGN) and Actavis plc (ACT) both rose when ACT agreed to pay about $66 billion for AGN. Also, Halliburton (HAL) announced its acquisition of Baker Hughes (BHI). All four of these companies have been Sabrient favorites and…
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Sector Detector: Investors make up new rules for their new market paradigm

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

By Scott Martindale

Investors in U.S. equities seem to have embraced a new market paradigm in which upside spikes come more swiftly than the downside selloffs. Remember when it used to be the other way around? When fear was stronger than greed? The market is consolidating its gains off the early-October V-bottom reversal, and no one seems to be in any hurry to unload shares this time around, with the holidays rapidly approaching and all. After all, there are bright blue skies directly overhead giving hope and respite from the early freeze blanketing the country.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

Currency wars continue as central banks seek to stimulate their economies through devaluation in a race to the bottom, while corruption and ineptitude in places like Russia and Brazil destroy their currencies. It appears that the EU is finally starting to see some benefits, as its latest reported GDP growth showed up slightly to the positive side. Here in the U.S., GDP growth is expected to be at a 3.3% rate over the second half of 2014 and 4.4% for 2015.

As commodity prices continue to sink with a strengthening dollar and no inflation in sight, the former largest public company in the world Exxon Mobil (XOM) has seen its market cap tread water at around $403 billion), while Apple (AAPL) continues to pull further ahead ($670 billion) and Microsoft (MSFT) moves into the second spot ($409 billion). As discussed below, our fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings score Energy and Basic Materials at the bottom, primarily because of Wall Street’s continued downward revisions in forward earnings estimates. Nevertheless, both sectors have seen such price declines that their forward valuations are still quite attractive compared with the overall market.

So, how is the overall market valuation right now? On the one hand, the…
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ETF Chart of the Day: KNOW

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

KNOW - Chart of the Day

KNOW, the Direxion All-Cap Insider Sentiment Shares ETF, is ETF Trends' "Chart of the  Day."  KNOW tracks Sabrient's Multi-Cap Insider/Analyst Quant-Weighted Index.

Read article.





Sector Detector: Bulls rule as volatility recedes and investors position for holiday cheer

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

After displaying a classic V-bottom reversal to what turned out to be a quick and anemic attempt by the bears to bring about a real correction, bullish fervor is becoming contagious, especially as the traditionally strong holiday season approaches. Indeed, the brief selloff was snatched up as a buying opportunity as I predicted it would, but my concerns about the market consolidating and struggling to hit new highs before year end were quickly dismissed. So, with nothing but blue skies overhead, will the party simply roll on?

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

Bulls are back in control. The S&P 500, Dow Jones Industrials, and NASDAQ 100 each have surged well above their respective round-number millennium resistance levels — 2,000, 17,000, and 4,000 — while the broader NASDAQ Composite is getting within sight of challenging the 5,000 level (last seen during the heights of the Internet bubble) and the Russell 2000 small caps are eyeing the 1,200 level once again.

And why not? Unemployment recently fell to 5.8%, GDP is growing better than 3%, interest rates remain low, corporate earnings reports continue to come in slightly better than expected, stock buybacks continue while capital investment is returning, the overblown worry about an Ebola pandemic in the U.S. has subsided, and ECB and BOJ are taking the baton from the Federal Reserve in the way of liquidity programs. (And keep in mind, the Fed is not unwinding its balance sheet, so maturing securities are being reinvested.) Moreover, the 10-year U.S. Treasury bond yield closed Friday at 2.31%, with little impetus for it to rise anytime soon.

With a forward P/E of about 16, when you compare the S&P 500 earnings yield of about 6.3% with the 10-year Treasury yield, the spread is about 4% versus the historical norm of about 3%. So, there is plenty of room for higher equity valuations. Also worth mentioning, ConvergEx reported in their Morning Briefing that using the 30-year averages of comparative price ranges, U.S.…
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Sector Detector: Bullish conviction returns, but market likely to consolidate its V-bottom

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Bulls showed renewed backbone last week and drew a line in the sand for the bears, buying with gusto into weakness as I suggested they would. After all, this was the buying opportunity they had been waiting for. As if on cue, the start of the World Series launched the rapid market reversal and recovery. However, there is little chance that the rally will go straight up. Volatility is back, and I would look for prices to consolidate at this level before making an attempt to go higher. I still question whether the S&P 500 will ultimately achieve a new high before year end.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

I am in NYC this weekend between trips and visiting my daughter at college, so I’ll keep this short. After some profit protection kicked into gear in the face of an exaggerated Black Swan scare around Ebola, along with all the other usual worries about slowing global growth and terrorism (and the delta-hedge short selling associated with options expiration), investors finally came to their senses. The S&P 500 enjoyed its biggest week of the year (+4.1%), and yet active investment managers (including hedge funds) are now underinvested after dumping shares during the selloff.

As I said in last week’s article, investing is about stacking the odds in your favor, and the more severe technical conditions become, the greater the odds of a bounce or outright reversal. So far, it appears that a classic V-bottom reversal scenario is trying to play out.

But I seriously doubt it will be party time again for the more speculative names. A high-quality balance sheet has become very important. New market psychology has set the stage for lower equity correlations, selective stock picking, and capital flight to the highest quality companies, i.e., those with strong market position, solid cash flow, and low debt levels.

Energy had been by far the worst performing sector for the October (as of mid-month), but the sector got…
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Sector Detector: Sharp selloff in stocks sets up long-awaiting buying opportunity

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Last week brought even more stock market weakness and volatility as the selloff became self-perpetuating, with nobody mid-day on Wednesday wanting to be the last guy left holding equities. Hedge funds and other weak holders exacerbated the situation. But the extreme volatility and panic selling finally led some bulls (along with many corporate insiders) to summon a little backbone and buy into weakness, and the market finished the week on a high note, with continued momentum likely into the first part of this week.

Despite concerns about global economic growth and a persistent lack of inflation, especially given all the global quantitative easing, fundamentals for U.S. stocks still look good, and I believe this overdue correction ultimately will shape up to be a great buying opportunity — i.e., there is no need for investors to be afraid of the very thing they have been hoping for. Also, the charts are looking exhausted to the downside, and our fundamentals-based rankings remain slightly bullish.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

Three weeks ago, the market finished the first week of October oversold, and the following week it became extremely oversold, and then last week it reached severely oversold. Obviously, no matter how overbought or oversold the market gets, it can always get more so. However, investing is about stacking the odds in your favor, and the more severe technical conditions become, the greater the odds of a bounce or outright reversal.

As of Friday, the S&P 500 closed down -6% from its closing peak on September 18 (but on an intraday basis, the peak-to-trough pullback was -9.8%). The MSCI World Index is down -10% from its September 2 high.

The top performing sectors last week were Telecom, Industrial, and Basic Materials, but these three had fallen the most the prior week. For the month of October, Utilities is up about +2%, which is far more than everyone else. Consumer Goods/Staples is down less than -2%, and the others are worse (Energy is down…
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Sector Detector: Semiconductors get slammed as investors scramble to protect profits

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Volatility continues to increase in the stock market and many of the leaders are breaking down. In particular, semiconductors took a rather big hit when one of the bellwethers warned of weakening global demand. Nevertheless, despite the significant headwinds, I do not think this spells the end of the bull market. But the technical damage to the charts is severe, particularly to the small caps, which are in full-blown correction mode. The large caps must show leadership and rally immediately — or it will put at risk the critical and widely-anticipated year-end rally.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

So far in October, the market already has seen five days with moves greater than 1%, which is as many such days as we saw in the prior five months combined. Jeff Macke observed in Yahoo! Finance that nearly one third of every trading day in the month of October since 1970 has seen 1% movements, up or down, including the infamous Black Monday of 1987. Heck, even the great Wall Street Crash of 1929 commenced in October.

No, weakness in October is not unusual, and this year in particular, because it has been so long since the broad market has pulled back in a meaningful way, I see it as a welcome cleansing that should validate some key support levels, wring out some excesses and overbought technical conditions, and establish a base from which to kick off the highly anticipated year-end rally.

Germany announced on Monday that factor orders fell -5.7%, which heightened fears among an already fearful investor community that Europe is worse off than thought. But then on Wednesday, the Dow Jones Industrial Average saw its best percentage gain of the year when the FOMC minutes expressed concern about the strong dollar and global economic weakness, which suggested that interest rate hikes are still a long ways off.

But then Thursday brought the worst daily point drop of the year, and the NASDAQ Composite endured its…
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Sector Detector: Overdue market weakness finally hits, but sector rankings turn bullish

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Scott MartindaleThis seasonally weak time of the year has proven reliable once again. As I observed last week, the volatility index often hits a peak in October but has never hit a trough during this notorious month. Last week, I warned of more downside in stocks before any new highs are challenged. It was the type of week that tests investors’ bullish conviction, and it was way overdue.

So, is that it for downside this year? Is the market ready to commence its end-of-year rally now? Well, the charts appear to be in recovery mode, and our fundamentals-based sector rankings have turned bullish. But with volatility setting in, I don’t think we have seen the last of the scary market action. Will the S&P 500 fall into the -10% correction that we haven’t seen in three years? I think it is unlikely at this time, but I expect further consolidation and testing of bullish conviction in the near term.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

The fourth quarter kicked off with a new flavor — extreme market weakness. Not only did the large caps finally shows some vulnerability, but small caps are now looking like they are in a full-blown correction from their highs reached back in July. But weakness in October is not unusual, and in fact I see it as a welcome cleansing that should validate some key support levels, wring out some excesses and overbought technical conditions, and establish a base from which to kick off the highly anticipated year-end rally.

Of course, one major signal on Friday that investors applauded was the unemployment report showing a dip to 5.9%, which is its first time below 6% since 2008. 248,000 jobs were added in September and August was revised upward from 142,000 to 180,000. Also, the ISM Services report came in at a robust 58.6.

Earnings reports for Q3 kick off this week, and according to Capital IQ, S&P 500 companies in aggregate are expected to…
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Sector Detector: Stocks fight off predictable weakness, but expect more downside

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Yes, the market showed significant weakness last week for the first time in quite a while. In fact, the Dow Jones Industrial Average moved triple digits each day. But it was all quite predictable, as I suggested in last week’s article, and certainly nothing to worry about. Now the market appears to be poised for a modest technical rebound, and longer term, U.S. equities should be in good shape for a year-end rally. However, I still believe more downside is in order before any new highs are challenged. Moreover, market breadth is important for a sustained bull run, so the challenge for investors will be to put together broader bullish conviction, including the small caps.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

Last week’s weakness was expected for a variety of reasons, including the weak near-term technical picture and the fact that the week following a triple (or quadruple) witching options expiration day (like the prior Friday) is usually negative. So, there was nothing concerning at all about last week’s increased volatility and market turbulence. On the contrary, it was welcome cleansing action.

The U.S. economy has been showing steady strengthening while other developed markets are languishing. Q2 GDP grew at an impressive rate of +4.6% annual rate (after the Q1 contraction of -2.1%), and many economists are revising upward for Q3 to above +3%. Also, consumer spending grew by +2.5% annual rate, business investment +9.7%, and exports +11.5%, while consumer sentiment has improved. So, with quant easing programs in place around the world creating abundant global liquidity seeking safe and attractive return in the face of escalating turmoil, violence, and terrorism, there has been a flow of capital into U.S. stocks and bonds and a notable strengthening in the U.S. dollar (particularly against the yen and euro).

This has helped keep stock and bond prices high and inflation low, thus giving the Fed room to remain accommodative. And it intends to do so, even after accumulating $4.5 trillion in assets…
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Sector Detector: Bulls leverage hopeful news to launch a tepid breakout attempt

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Scott MartindaleStocks were able to leverage some optimistic news and dovish words from the Fed to take another stab at an upside breakout attempt last week. Although readers have sometimes accused me of being a permabull, I am really a realist, and the reality is that the slogans like “The trend is your friend” and “Don’t fight the Fed” are truisms. And they have worked. Nevertheless, I am still not convinced that we have seen the ultimate lows for this pullback, especially given the weak technical condition of small caps.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

Bulls got a solid show of support from friends in high places last week. Of course, the biggest drivers of the stock market’s strong performance has been 1) signs of an improving economy, 2) global liquidity provided by dovish central bankers, and 3) global turmoil pushing cautious investors with all that liquidity in their hands into the relative safety and quality of U.S. securities of all types. The FOMC statement on Wednesday indicated no change in the dovish policies and no threat of an imminent move to raise short-term interest rates. ECB quant easing has led to a fall in the British pound and the euro. This has led to a notable strengthening in the U.S. dollar, which has helped keep inflation low, thus giving the Fed room to remain accommodative, which in turn is supportive of elevated valuation multiples in equities.

The 10-year Treasury closed Friday at 2.57%, which is down slightly from the prior week. I still think there is greater downside potential in the 10-year yield, especially given global liquidity and the resulting demand for the safety of U.S. Treasuries. Inflation is hard to find, and many economies around the world are trying to stave off recession and deflation (including Europe and Japan). Low interest rates could be with us for a while.

After 5.5 years of a liquidity-fueled bull market, many observers are saying the market is getting long in…
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Zero Hedge

"We Are A Nation Built On The Rule Of Law"

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Having explained to the residents of Ferguson that "first and foremost, we are a nation built on the rule of law," we thought the following 'discussion' of the difference between "laws" and President Obama's executive orders would help clarify a few things...

 

...

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Phil's Favorites

The Brutal Monotony of All Time Highs

The Brutal Monotony of All Time Highs

Courtesy of 

There’s only one subtle joke in the film Anchorman and it involves the fact that the San Diego news team’s weather man has a sub-100 IQ. In a city where “72 and sunny” is the forecast 365 days a year, even Brick Tamland has no problem reliably delivering this news to the viewers.

In the chart below, via my firm‘s Research Director Michael Batnick, you’ll see the S&P 500 ETF overlaying a chart indicating new all time high closes (in red). The monoton...



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Chart School

Michigan Consumer Sentiment for November Slightly Trims Its Strong Preliminary Reading

Courtesy of Doug Short.

The Final University of Michigan Consumer Sentiment for November came in at 88.8, a bit off the 89.4 preliminary reading but up from from the October Final of 86.9. As finaly readings go, this is a post-recession high and the highest level since July 2007, over seven years ago. Today's number came in below the Investing.com forecast of 90.2.

See the chart below for a long-term perspective on this widely watched indicator. I've highlighted recessions and included real GDP to help evaluate the correlation between the Michigan Consumer Sentiment Index and the broader economy.


...



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Insider Scoop

Morgan Stanley: Nimble Storage Increased Its Market Four-Fold

Courtesy of Benzinga.

Nimble Storage Inc (NYSE: NMBL) reported its third quarter results on Tuesday after market close. The company reported a loss of $0.15 per share, slightly better than the $0.16 per share loss analysts were expecting, while revenue of $59.10 million was higher than the $57.75 million analysts were expecting.

In a note to clients on Wednesday, Katy Huberty of Morgan Stanley noted that the company “continues to disrupt the storage market” as new customer adoption doubled year-over-year, increasing its installed base to more than 4,300 customers.

The analyst also notes that international investments are “beginning to pay off” as revenue grew 135 percent from a year ago, contributing 20 percent of total revenue in the quarter.

However, Huberty singles out the addition of the Fibre Channel (FC) protocol. The analyst states that the company has now ex...



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All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: David is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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Sabrient

Sector Detector: Holiday fever takes hold of stock investors, but a pullback is needed

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

With warmer weather arriving to melt the early snowfall across much of the country, investors seem to be catching a severe case of holiday fever and positioning themselves for the seasonally bullish time of the year. And to give an added boost, both Europe and Asia provided more fuel for the bull’s fire last week with stimulus announcements, particularly China’s interest rate cut. Yes, all systems are go for U.S. equities as there really is no other game in town. But nothing goes up in a straight line, not even during the holidays, so a near-term market pullback would be a healthy way to prevent a steeper correction in January.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based Sector...



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Digital Currencies

Bitcoin Mining

Bitcoin Mining

Courtesy of Global Economic Intersection

By Rod Garratt and Rosa Hayes - Liberty Street Economics, Federal Reserve Bank of New York

In June 2014, the mining pool Ghash.IO briefly controlled more than half of all mining power in the Bitcoin network, awakening fears that it might attempt to manipulate the blockchain, the public record of all Bitcoin transactions. Alarming headlines splattered the blogosphere. But should members of the Bitcoin community be worried?

Miners are members of the Bitcoin community who engage in a proce...



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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of November 25th, 2014

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Stock World Weekly

Stock World Weekly

Newsletter writers are available to chat with Members regarding topics presented in SWW, comments are found below each post.

Here's the Happy Thanksgiving Edition of Stock World Weekly!

Click on this link and sign in with your PSW user name and password. 

Picture via Pixabay.

...

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Market Shadows

Official Moves in the Market Shadows' Virtual Portfolio

By Ilene 

I officially bought 250 shares of EZCH at $18.76 and sold 300 shares of IGT at $17.09 in Market Shadows' Virtual Portfolio yesterday (Fri. 11-21).

Click here for Thursday's post where I was thinking about buying EZCH. After further reading, I decided to add it to the virtual portfolio and to sell IGT and several other stocks, which we'll be saying goodbye to next week.

Notes

1. th...



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Option Review

Yamana Gold call options sink

Yamana Gold call options sink

By Andrew Wilkinson at Interactive Brokers

A four-year low for the spot price of gold has had a devastating impact on Yamana Gold (Ticker: AUY), with shares in the name down at the lowest price in six years. Some option traders were especially keen to sell premium and appear to see few signs of a lasting rebound within the next five months. The price of gold suffered again Wednesday as the dollar strengthened and stock prices advanced. The post price of gold fell to $1145 adding further pain to share prices of gold miners. Shares in Yamana Gold tumbled to $3.62 and the lowest price since 2008 as call option sellers used the April expiration contract to write premium at the $5.00 strike. That strike is now 38% above the price of the stock. Premium writers took in around 16-cents per contract o...



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Pharmboy

Biotechs & Bubbles

Reminder: Pharmboy is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Well PSW Subscribers....I am still here, barely.  From my last post a few months ago to now, nothing has changed much, but there are a few bargins out there that as investors, should be put on the watch list (again) and if so desired....buy a small amount.

First, the media is on a tear against biotechs/pharma, ripping companies for their drug prices.  Gilead's HepC drug, Sovaldi, is priced at $84K for the 12-week treatment.  Pundits were screaming bloody murder that it was a total rip off, but when one investigates the other drugs out there, and the consequences of not taking Sovaldi vs. another drug combinations, then things become clearer.  For instance, Olysio (JNJ) is about $66,000 for a 12-week treatment, but is approved for fewer types of patients AND...



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Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

"Hello PSW Members –

This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743

Thank you for you time!




FeedTheBull - Top Stock market and Finance Sites



About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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