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Sector Detector: Lackluster earnings reports put eager bulls back into waiting mode

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Corporate earnings reports have been mixed at best, interspersed with the occasional spectacular report — primarily from mega-caps like Google (GOOGL), Facebook (FB), or Amazon (AMZN). Some of the bulls have taken their chips off the table until after Labor Day, while others have merely scaled back to scalping some trades. Either way, stocks appear destined to thrash about for the rest of the summer.

Market overview:

Earnings season is off and running, and yes, some of the reports have been startlingly strong. Beyond the blowout numbers from mega-caps like Google, Facebook, and Amazon, we have heard the occasional terrific report from firms like Sabrient-favorite Valeant Pharmaceuticals (VRX). On the flip side, IBM (IBM), United Technologies (UTX) and Verizon (VZ) have disappointed. In any case, leadership has been narrowing, and market breadth is about the worst in the past 15 years.

Healthcare has been by far the best performing sector again this year, but Financials are starting to perk up. And looking forward, there is optimism that banks will do well in an environment of rising rates and a steepening yield curve.

Of course, given the strength of the US dollar, commodities across the board are in glut mode, with much weeping and gnashing of teeth in the Energy and Basic Materials sectors. Nevertheless, refiners of petroleum products are doing quite well, thank you, and enjoying strong operating margins. The “crack spread,” i.e., the difference between the cost paid for crude oil versus the price received for refined product has been very attractive. Sabrient favorites in the space include Tesoro (TSO), Valero Energy (VLO), and Marathon Petroleum (MPC).

Other than earnings, the other big news story is China’s stock market, which took…
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Sector Detector: Stocks break out from their holding pattern as global uncertainties begin to settle out

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

We all know the big news stories that have kept both corporate leaders and investors in a semi-state of paralysis. They involve the future of Greece in the Eurozone, China’s growth and stock market stability, and the Federal Reserve’s plan for gradually normalizing the fed funds rate. I noted in my article last week that the technical picture appeared to be firming up for the bulls as the 200-day moving average kicked in with solid support and traders seemed to be doing an orderly retreat-and-retrench rather than panic-selling. As if on cue, today brought news of a deal to keep Greece in the Eurozone, and bulls appear to have seized a new buying opportunity.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

Although today’s news about a deal for Greece was met with cheer by equity investors, the truth of the matter is that the proverbial can is merely being kicked down the road a bit further, with no confidence-inducing signs that anything in that country is going to change in a significant way. And although Greece has a trivial impact on EU GDP, a Grexit would leave too much uncertainty about the future of the euro. As for China, their experiment with their unique brand of authoritarian-capitalism is being tested to the extremes, particularly what happens when unfettered growth runs up against some natural limits. And then of course there is the Federal Reserve, which is bound-and-determined to start hiking rates at some point soon, which investors seem to fear but which history shows does not tank markets if done in a measured way.

All of this has brought back the risk-on/risk-off behavior that traders and institutional portfolio managers loathe.

S&P Capital IQ reports that the Q2 earnings growth expectation for S&P 500 companies is…
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Sector Detector: Bulls prepare for a new buying opportunity, courtesy of Greece

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Of course, all eyes have been on Greece in an ongoing saga that, although critical to the Greeks, is mostly just an annoying distraction for global investors — partly because it has been going on for so many years, with the proverbial can of inevitability continually being kicked down the road, and partly because there can be no winners in this intractable situation. Predictably, the electorate chose to follow the advice of the communists that they elected and reject the rigid bailout offer, calling the bluff of the IMF, ECB, and Eurozone and betting they will do whatever it takes to avoid losing one of its members. These are uncharted waters, and with the resultant shadow of uncertainty hanging over the markets, traders fled to the safety of cash, and the S&P 500 has relied upon support from its 200-day simple moving average to kick in (both last Monday and again today). But the technical picture may be firming up for the bulls. Moreover,, I would characterize the resulting market action as an orderly retreat rather than panic selling as traders appear to be simply taking risk off the table while preparing for a buying opportunity.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

At the close of 1H2015, among the U.S. business sectors, top performers for the first half were Healthcare and Consumer Services (Discretionary/Cyclical), particularly the homebuilders like the SPDR S&P Homebuilders ETF (XHB), while income-oriented Utilities and REITs, as well as Energy, and Metals & Mining have been big laggards. The 10-year US Treasury yield hasn’t moved much, closing last week at 2.39%.

Although Puerto Rico has thrown itself into the mix of debt calamities, the major crisis of the moment has been Greece and the Eurozone. After all, the whole concept of a single…
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Sector Detector: Bulls under the gun to muster troops, while bears lie in wait

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Two weeks ago, bulls seemed ready to push stocks higher as long-standing support reliably kicked in. But with just one full week to go before the Independence Day holiday week arrives, we will see if bulls can muster some reinforcements and make another run at the May highs. Small caps and NASDAQ are already there, but it is questionable whether those segments can drag along the broader market. To be sure, there is plenty of potential fuel floating around in the form of a friendly Fed and abundant global liquidity seeking the safety and strength of US stocks and bonds. While the technical picture has glimmers of strength, summer bears lie in wait.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

Last week, the Fed sounded a predictably dovish tone while removing some of the uncertainty about their intentions on the fed funds rate, while investors seem to be coming to terms with the relatively low impact of any Greek outcome. As a result, stocks made another breakout attempt, led by the Healthcare sector and in particular biotech, with the iShares NASDAQ Biotechnology Index ETF (IBB) rising 3.1% on Thursday, as well as a tepid breakout in the small and mid caps. The 10-year Treasury yield closed Friday at 2.27%, as the Fed’s dovish tone brought back global investors.

Stocks have enjoyed the benefit of the double benefit of rising corporate earnings and falling interest rates (and rising liquidity). But if rising wages cut into profits, and interest rates start to creep up, the fear is that asset prices will be capped and stocks will suffer. But the fear is that raising rates high enough to make a difference to interest-hungry investors and retirees would cap (or even collapse) asset prices. Thus, any sign that the Fed will keep it slow with rate hikes is well received.


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Sector Detector: Bulls may be getting ready to push stocks higher

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

After a brief pullback to retest support levels, it appears that bulls may be preparing to take the market higher. Although retail investors are still hesitant, risk-taking among institutions is apparent. Cheap cash from abundant global liquidity is hungry for higher returns. Margin debt is high. Credit spreads are low. Subprime loans are back in vogue. Small caps and the banking sector in particular look ready to resume a leadership role.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

After last week’s strong jobs report (coming in 25% above expectations), Treasury yields spiked, the dollar strengthened, and dividend stocks took a hit while growth stocks held up, particularly the NASDAQ, mid caps, and small caps. Market commentators of course have expressed a wide range of views ranging from cautious optimism to outright collapse. For example, Goldman Sachs’s chief U.S. equity strategist David Kostin just announced a prediction that the S&P 500 will finish the year around current levels as the market simply treads water and relies upon dividends for further returns.

Some of the dominant concerns include the fact that total margin debt is at record levels, hitting $507 billion in mid-April, and while the major indexes have been hitting record highs, breadth is narrow (NYSE Composite has not challenged its high), GDP growth has shrunk, unit labor costs have surged, and corporate profits have struggled.

Of course, the strong dollar has been blamed as a prime culprit for hindering profits. However, the U.S. economy overall has enjoyed a net benefit from the strong dollar, with low oil and gasoline prices, affordable imports and overseas travel, and foreign investors flocking to the safety, yield, and bullish trend of the dollar. Nevertheless, although companies appear to be doing some hiring, they continue to be reluctant to make much in the way of new capital investment in PP&E.

As a result, 95% of profits at S&P 500 stocks last year were used for stock buybacks or dividends. In April, $133 billion of…
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Sector Detector: Stocks provide a tepid breakout as Fed greases the skids. So now what?

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Early last week, stocks broke out, with the S&P 500 setting a new high with blue skies overhead. But then the market basically flat-lined for the rest of the week as bulls just couldn’t gather the fuel and conviction to take prices higher. In fact, the technical picture now has turned a bit defensive, at least for the short term, thus joining what has been a neutral-to-defensive tilt to our fundamentals-based Outlook rankings.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

Last Wednesday’s FOMC minutes confirmed investor expectations by indicating that economic data does not yet warrant a fed funds rate hike in June, and investors took this as a reason to finally break out above stubborn technical resistance. Both PMI manufacturing and the Philly Fed index came in with readings that show some growth, but below expectations. The 4-week average on jobless claims fell to 266,000, which is quite promising. Equities remain the favored asset class this year, particularly those playing catch-up, like China, Japan, Europe — and even emerging markets.

It now has been almost three years since the market pulled back at least 10%. Nevertheless, bulls are having a hard time gaining traction after this latest technical breakout (basically flat-lining after last Monday), and a test of conviction is sure to come. The psychological thresholds of Dow at 18,000, S&P 500 at 2100, NASDAQ at 5,000, and Russell 2000 at 1200 all must hold as support levels, or we are back to the market churn, searching for a new catalyst.

The CBOE Market Volatility Index (VIX), a.k.a. fear gauge, closed Friday at 12.13 and has held below the 15 fear threshold since a brief spike to that level back on May 6-7. In addition, the volatility of volatility (i.e., the VVIX) reached its lowest level since July 2014. In fact, ConvergEx points out that the expected volatility has fallen over the last month for a range of equities including U.S. small caps, emerging markets, and 8 of 10…
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Sector Detector: Bullish technical picture appears to trump cautious fundamentals

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

By Scott Martindale

Stocks closed last week on a strong note, with the S&P 500 notching a new high, despite lackluster economic data and growth. I have been suggesting in previous articles that stocks appeared to be coiling for a significant move but that the ingredients were not yet in place for either a major breakout or a corrective selloff. However, bulls appear to be losing patience awaiting their next definitive catalyst, and the higher-likelihood upside move may now be underway. Yet despite the bullish technical picture, this week’s fundamentals-based Outlook rankings look even more defensive.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

All the major indexes are back comfortably above their psychological thresholds, including Dow at 18,000, S&P 500 at 2100, NASDAQ at 5,000, and Russell 2000 at 1200. And yet most of the U.S. economic reports lately have been surprisingly weak. Consumer sentiment fell to 88.6, industrial production fell for the fifth straight month (mainly due to the energy, mining and utilities segments), capacity utilization declined to 78.2%, consumer comfort index fell yet again, wholesale prices (PPI) tumbled, and April retail sales disappointed.

On the other hand, it must be said that “core” retail sales (x-autos, building materials, and gasoline) actually rose and March sales were revised upward to +1.1%. Also, the Federal budget deficit fell, overall debt levels continue to improve, the US dollar has receded from its recent highs, employment and wages are improving, public companies continue to reduce operating costs and leverage while boosting free cash flow; and Q1 corporate earnings reports have largely beat reduced expectations. Also worth noting, in April the U.S. Treasury Department reported an all-time monthly record of $288 billion in individual income tax payments (indicating that people are making more money and were under-withholding).


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Sector Detector: Bulls hold the line as market coils in anticipation of a bigger move

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

After posting record highs the previous week, stocks closed last week slightly down overall. But the major indexes held their psychological levels, including Dow at 18,000, S&P 500 at 2100, NASDAQ at 5,000, and Russell 2000 at 1200. Although the bulls continue to find reliable support levels nearby, strong overhead technical resistance and neutral-to-defensive rankings in our SectorCast fundamentals-based quant model continue to suggest that a major upside breakout is not quite imminent, although a selloff doesn’t seem to be in the cards, either. Overall, stocks appear to be coiling ever tighter while awaiting a catalyst. Earnings season hasn’t provided it, so it might not come until the June meeting of the FOMC.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

Net-net, the various economic reports last week were taken positively. Q1 GDP report indeed came in quite weak at an annualized +0.2%, but it was evidently already priced in and fully expected, with expectations for grand improvement going forward. The ISM Manufacturing report on Friday came in at 51.5 (unchanged from prior month), and New Orders rose to 53.5. Positive economic reports from Japan and China helped the bulls’ cause, with inflation rising in Japan during March and China showing some growth in both manufacturing and services sectors. The University of Michigan Consumer Sentiment Index for April was 95.9 (versus 93 in March). And first-time applicants for unemployment fell to the lowest in 15 years.

Here are some other noteworthy observations. Last year, S&P 500 companies spent 95% of their operating margins on buybacks and dividends, and this year, stock buybacks and dividends will surpass a record $1 trillion. Also, ETFGI reports that total assets invested in the global ETF/ETP industry will surpass assets in the global hedge fund industry during the current calendar quarter (both are currently around $2.9 trillion).…
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Sector Detector: Sector rotation model stays bullish, but neutral rankings and technical resistance flash caution

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Last week, stocks cycled bullish yet again. In fact, the S&P 500, NYSE Composite, and NASDAQ each closed at record highs as investors positioned for the heart of earnings season in the wake of strong reports from some of the Tech giants. Notably, Utilities stocks got some renewed traction as yield-starved investors returned to the sector. Although our trend-following sector rotation model remains bullish, strong overhead technical resistance and neutral rankings in our SectorCast quant model indicate that caution is in order, and this might not be the moment for a major upside breakout, particularly given the expected softness in earnings reports.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

The previous record high for the NASDAQ of 5049 was hit on March 10, 2000, and now 15 years later, it has finally eclipsed the high — but with much more reasonable valuation multiples. And it was the old-guard leadership from that former heyday that has set the tone, with Amazon (AMZN), Google (GOOGL), and Microsoft (MSFT) all putting out strong reports with successful initiatives outside of their traditional business models. There is also the expectation that the US dollar, which is up nearly 28% since last May’s low, is set to weaken a bit, which would give a much needed boost to corporate earnings.

But it is international markets that have performed the best this year, as they can avoid the headwinds that U.S. companies are facing with the strong U.S. dollar and slow sales and earnings growth. Looking beyond Europe and Japan, the Market Vectors Russia ETF (RSX) is up 36% YTD, iShares China Large-Cap (FXI) is up 25% (on the back of ultra high multiples and leverage, and Global X MSCI Argentina ETF (ARGT) is up 18%.

A variety of…
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Sector Detector: Earnings and GDP temporarily take investor spotlight off the Fed

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

As we get into the heart of earnings season and anticipate the GDP report for Q1, the investor spotlight has been taken off the Federal Reserve and timing of its first interest rate hike, at least temporarily. Even though Q1 economic growth will undoubtedly look weak, the future remains bright for the U.S economy – even though many multinationals will struggle with top-line growth due to the strong dollar – and any near-term selloff resulting from weak economic or earnings news should be bought yet again in expectation of better results for the balance of the year. High sector correlations remain a concern, reflecting herd-like risk-on/risk-off behavior rather than thoughtful stock-picking.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

Similar to Q1 2014, it appears that severe winter weather in the US is going to reveal its harsh impact on Q1 economic activity, which is likely to show economic growth near zero or even negative. GDP is scheduled to be released on April 29. Other negative factors include cutbacks in Energy sector spending, the West Coast port slowdown, and the strong dollar.  Already, we have seen consumer spending flat or declining in December, January, and February, jobs growth has slowed, and U.S. retail sales had its worst 3-month performance since 2009. Nevertheless, most economists are still forecasting positive growth, so investors might decide to sell first and let the dust settle if/when bad numbers are actually released.

With the reduced expectation for corporate earnings, the S&P 500 has a forward valuation that has reach about 17x. Moreover, the CAPE (cyclically-adjusted P/E) has reach about 28x, which is the highest since the pre-meltdown years of 1928 and 2007.

Of course, the 10-year US Treasury bond was yielding around 4.5% in July 2007, whereas it…
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Zero Hedge

Greek Economy Faces Total Collapse As Doctors Flee, Retail Sales Plunge 70%

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Back in May we outlined the cost to the Greek economy of each day without a deal between Athens and creditors.

At the time, a report from the Hellenic Confederation of Commerce and Enterprises showed that 60 businesses closed and 613 jobs were lost for each business day that the crisis persisted without a resolution. 

Since then, things have deteriorated further and indeed, with the imposition of capital controls, businesses found that ...



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ValueWalk

More Evidence Of China Slowing Permeating Asia [Charts]

By Gavekal Capital Blog. Originally published at ValueWalk.

More Evidence Of China Slowing Permeating Asia by Bryce Coward, Gavekal Capital

Today’s edition of our diary of weak Asian economic stats focuses on the recently released trade and industrial production numbers out of Thailand and the trade numbers from Hong Kong. The Thai economy is feeling the pain of the Chinese slowdown acutely even in the most highly level economic statistics. Meanwhile the Hong Kong trade figures, which we view more as a proxy for Chinese trade given its intermediary port position connecting China with the rest of the world, paint the picture of the weakest trade by volume since 2013.

...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

Travel indicator being put to critical tests

Courtesy of Chris Kimble.

The American Economy is driven a good deal by the consumer.

The table below reflects that nearly 70% of GDP is based consumption.

CLICK ON CHART TO ENLARGE

The 4-pack below looks at consumption with a focus on the travel and leisure sector, by looking at Avis (CAR), Hertz (HTZ), Expedia (EXPE) and Priceline (PCLN).

CLICK ON CHART ABOVE TO ENLARGE

While many seem to be occupied by the news abou...



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Phil's Favorites

Information overload is making us dumber investors

"Information overload" may be especially problematic when we don't have a plan or don't stick with our plan. For example, we may have a long term goal for a stock, but then short term information gets presented, and we act on it, abandoning our original thesis. This can lead to over-trading, chasing the news, and ultimately, regrets. 

Information overload is making us dumber investors

BY JEFF REEVES'S STRENGTH IN NUMBERS

Excerpt:

We live in an age of seemingly infinite information, and that’s great in many ways. But that doesn’t make investors any smarter.

Stock rese...



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Market News

News You Can Use From Phil's Stock World

 

Financial Markets and Economy

2015 has simply not been a fun year in the stock market (Business Insider)

2015 has not been a fun year for stock investors. 

In 2015, the S&P 500, which opened the year nearly at all-time highs, has made a new all-time high just 10 times. For a point of comparison, at this time last time at this year, the benchmark index had hit 27 fresh all-time records, and when 2014 was said and done, the S&P 500 had hit a new record 53 times. 

The bull in China’s shop has no more room to run (Market Watch) ...



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Sabrient

Sector Detector: Lackluster earnings reports put eager bulls back into waiting mode

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Corporate earnings reports have been mixed at best, interspersed with the occasional spectacular report -- primarily from mega-caps like Google (GOOGL), Facebook (FB), or Amazon (AMZN). Some of the bul...



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Chart School

Fifth Day of Selling

Courtesy of Declan.

Sellers in the S&P made it five days of downside in a row. On this last day it closed near the day's lows, but also on its 200-day MA. If there was reason for a bounce, then tomorrow could be the day.  Technicals are all net negative.


The Dow took the selling harder. It undercut the July swing low having earlier lost its 200-day MA. Next up is the February swing low.


Small Caps finished at its 200-day MA, after it lost trendline support on Friday...

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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: David is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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Digital Currencies

Gold Spikes Back Above $1100, Bitcoin Jumps

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Gold is jumping after the overnight double flash-crash...testing back towards $1100...

Bitcoin is back up to pre-"Greece is Fixed" levels...

Charts: Bloomberg and Bitcoinwisdom

...

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Pharmboy

Baxter's Spinoff

Reminder: Pharmboy and Ilene are available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Baxter Int. (BAX) is splitting off its BioSciences division into a new company called Baxalta. Shares of Baxalta will be given as a tax-free dividend, in the ratio of one to one, to BAX holders on record on June 17, 2015. That means, if you want to receive the Baxalta dividend, you need to buy the stock this week (on or before June 12).

The Baxalta Spinoff

By Ilene with Trevor of Lowenthal Capital Partners and Paul Price

In its recent filing with the SEC, Baxter provides:

“This information statement is being ...



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Mapping The Market

An update on oil proxies

Courtesy of Jean-Luc Saillard

Back in December, I wrote a post on my blog where I compared the performances of various ETFs related to the oil industry. I was looking for the best possible proxy to match the moves of oil prices if you didn't want to play with futures. At the time, I concluded that for medium term trades, USO and the leveraged ETFs UCO and SCO were the most promising. Longer term, broader ETFs like OIH and XLE might make better investment if oil prices do recover to more profitable prices since ETF linked to futures like USO, UCO and SCO do suffer from decay. It also seemed that DIG and DUG could be promising if OIH could recover as it should with the price of oil, but that they don't make a good proxy for the price of oil itself. 

Since...



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Promotions

Watch the Phil Davis Special on Money Talk on BNN TV!

Kim Parlee interviews Phil on Money Talk. Be sure to watch the replays if you missed the show live on Wednesday night (it was recorded on Monday). As usual, Phil provides an excellent program packed with macro analysis, important lessons and trading ideas. ~ Ilene

 

The replay is now available on BNN's website. For the three part series, click on the links below. 

Part 1 is here (discussing the macro outlook for the markets) Part 2 is here. (discussing our main trading strategies) Part 3 is here. (reviewing our pick of th...

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Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

"Hello PSW Members –

This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743

Thank you for you time!




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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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