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Sector Detector: New Year brings new hope after bulls lose traction to close 2015

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Chart via Finviz

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Last year, the S&P 500 large caps closed 2015 essentially flat on a total return basis, while the NASDAQ 100 showed a little better performance at +8.3% and the Russell 2000 small caps fell -5.9%. Overall, stocks disappointed even in the face of modest expectations, especially the small caps as market leadership was mostly limited to a handful of large and mega-cap darlings.

Notably, the full year chart for the S&P 500 looks very much like 2011. It got off to a good start, drifted sideways for a few months, threw everyone into a tizzy with a scary summer correction, found double-bottom support leading to a strong October rally, and then fell into a sideways consolidation for the last two months of the year. It’s deja vu. In both years, a sideways channel set the trading range most of the time, and without a strong catalyst, there simply wasn’t enough fuel to ignite a major breakout for either the bulls or the bears.

In contrast to 2015 ending as it did with a whimper, the first trading day of 2016 was downright scary (the worst opening day for the Dow Industrials in eight years) — as if to give fair warning of a more volatile year ahead. But higher volatility wouldn’t necessarily be a bad thing, as investors and corporations may be more inclined to allocate capital with an eye toward risk exposures, i.e., a flight to quality, including value, GARP (growth at a reasonable price), and dividend-paying stocks. We just might end up looking back on 2015 as a cautious year of transition out of the ZIRP era.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview

Yes, U.S. stocks mostly disappointed investors last…
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Sector Detector: Fed sticks to the script, but not all investors are comforted

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Perhaps, 2015 has been a particularly crazy year. From extreme weather patterns, to a circus of a Presidential election cycle, to divergent central bank strategies, to the first triple-crown winner since 1978, to terrorist plots emanating from our neighborhoods, to counterintuitive asset class behaviors, to some of the most incredible college football finishes — just to name a few. So, it only seems apropos to cap the year with Steve Harvey messing up on announcing the winner of Miss Universe the other night, only to correct his mistake after allowing the first runner-up to walk around with the crown for a couple of minutes before taking it away from her. It is much like the tug-of-war in stocks this year, in which the bulls walk around with the crown for a short time before the bears take it away for their own brief walk on the runway. But neither side can progress very far.

Although both the technical and fundamental pictures are murky, leading many investors to take chips off the table for the holidays, there are signs that the path of least resistance in 2016 will be to the upside.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market Overview

As we at Sabrient gear up for the unveiling of our eighth annual Baker’s Dozen top picks for the New Year, I am looking forward to being on the road for pretty much the entire month of January, speaking with financial advisors across the country. I was in the Washington D.C. area last week and enjoyed some great meetings with advisors there. When I am in Florida in late January, I am excited to set aside a couple of days to attend part of the Inside ETFs 2016 conference in Hollywood, FL, which takes place January 24-27.…
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Sector Detector: Sector rotation model stays bullish, although fundamental rankings are still stuck in neutral

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

In a year in which stock prices mostly have been driven by news rather than fundamentals, three things stood out last week. First, terrorism has taken on an unsettling new face as the dark side of the exponential growth in social media rears its ugly head (with something much more sinister than porn sites or online bullying). Second, with the strong jobs report on Friday, the Federal Reserve seems to have all their ducks in a row to justify the first fed funds rate hike in nine years. And third, oil prices may remain far lower for far longer, with potentially more negative than positive impacts. Nevertheless, bulls continue to be comforted by seasonality and a strong technical picture (which is shaping up much like 2011). Thus, although our fundamentals-based sector rankings remain mostly neutral, the sector rotation model still reflects a bullish bias.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer \ some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview

Friday’s jobs reported was a big market mover. It showed that the U.S. economy created 211,000 jobs in November, beating expectations. September and October data was revised to show 35,000 more jobs than previously reported. And the official unemployment rate remained at 5% (i.e., what is generally considered to be full employment).

In response, U.S. stocks jumped more than 2% on Friday, with the Dow Jones blue chips and S&P 500 large caps posting their biggest one-day gains in three months. Nine of the ten S&P 500 business sectors climbed — all except Energy, which fell after OPEC failed to put a lid on its near-record output.

Oil is the proverbial Goldilocks market that needs to be not too hot and not too cold to work for all market segments. Too low creates instability in oil-exporting countries and threatens the health and livelihood of…
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Sector Detector: Bulls wrest back control of market direction, despite global adversity

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Some weeks when I write this article there is little new to talk about from the prior week. It’s always the Fed, global QE, China growth, election chatter, oil prices, etc. And then there are times like this in which there is so much happening that I don’t know where to start. Of course, the biggest market-moving news came the weekend before last when Paris was put face-to-face with the depths of human depravity and savagery. And yet the stock market responded with its best week of the year. As a result, the key issues dominating the front page and election chatter have moved from the economy and jobs to national security and a real war (rather than police actions) against a blood-thirsty orthodoxy that, as the world now seems to universally understand, cannot be simply contained. It is suddenly better to risk being wrong but strong than to be right but weak.

In any case, the major market indexes have remained undeterred — by either the Fed’s apparent foregone decision to raise the fed funds rate next month or the sudden wave of violence sweeping the globe — as seasonality and a strong technical picture continue to stoke bullish conviction in U.S. stocks. Moreover, our fundamentals-based sector rankings are mostly unchanged.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

First a planeload of Russian tourists is bombed out of the sky. Then Paris is attacked by suicidal murderers. Then Mali gets the same. Now Brussels is in lockdown. This is not just a containment problem any longer (not that it ever really was). The civilized world seems to be coming together in the conviction that we are at war with a blood-thirsty ideology bent on religious and ethnic cleansing that would sooner see the entire world annihilated…
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Sector Detector: Bullish conviction kicks into gear, as the stars align for holiday cheer

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

November got off to a strong start early last week, and the rally broadened to include financial and retail stocks. But after a torrid six weeks of bullish behavior while ignoring (or perhaps reveling in) concerns about the global economy during, U.S. stocks encountered some strong technical resistance in the middle of last week, and it has continued into Monday. The Dow Jones Transportation Index continues to a drag on the overall market, and this segment will need to gather some enthusiasm if the broader indexes are to resume their advance. Nevertheless, seasonality and a strong technical picture have renewed bullish conviction, so the path of least resistance is still up.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

The title of this article might make a good verse for a new market-oriented Christmas carol. You are welcome to offer up your own suggestions (I can’t wait to see this, especially from the market Scrooges out there).

Friday brought us the first dose of holiday cheer from an economic standpoint when we learned that the economy added 271,000 jobs in October, the unemployment rate fell to 5.0%, and average hourly earnings rose 2.4%. The weak US employment report for September was seen as at least partially responsible for October’s global rally. So, the question is, will the strong October jobs report do the opposite?

In a classic case of good-news-is-bad-news, this terrific economic news appears to have been taken as a temporary sell signal by investors since it was perceived as a green light for unwanted changes to monetary policies. Actually, it’s not so much that the changes are unwanted as that it creates uncertainty about the ultimate impact of moving away from the long-standing ZIRP policy. After all, nothing is ever as simple as it seems. Any…
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Sector Detector: Stocks break out as central banks get more dovish and seasonality kicks in

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

This year, the S&P 500 has greatly underperformed its average 18% return that it historically provides during the third year of a Presidential election cycle. But then, a lot seems to be different this year as correlations across most asset classes are high and prices are buffeted more by news events than fundamentals (which has made stock picking quite challenging).

Dovish policies by central banks around the globe have become the main drivers for improving bullish conviction, and now with a strong technical picture bolstered by solid earnings reports from market bellwethers, positive seasonality, and improving market internals, the near-term path of least resistance appears to be to the upside.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

On Thursday-Friday last week, the major averages were quite strong, with the Dow Industrials surging 578 points. On Friday, Technology and Healthcare were the clear winners. The biotech segment in particular tried to do some catching up for recent underperformance (and many Sabrient favorites in the space are selling at highly compelling valuations). Both sectors gapped up strongly, as did the NASDAQ 100 Index, which is largely made of stocks from these two sectors. Solid earnings reports from bellwethers like Amazon.com (AMZN), Alphabet (GOOGL), and Microsoft (MSFT) inspired the bulls to an extent, but the real driver on Thursday-Friday was the central banks in Europe and China.

ECB President Mario Draghi offered up renewed dovish sentiment by leaving interest rates unchanged, suggesting that both growth and inflation were facing downside risks, and indicating that December will be a time to re-examine current policies. Investors interpreted this to mean that the ECB will likely implement more QE in December. In addition, China’s central bank cut the cost of borrowing by 25 bps.…
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Sector Detector: Bulls rally, but bears lurk

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Last week, the S&P 500 put up its best week of the year, closing above key psychological levels and breaking through bearish technical resistance, with bulls largely inspired by the dovish FOMC meeting minutes. But this year’s market has been news-driven and quite difficult for traders to read. Even our fundamentals-based and quality-oriented quant models have struggled to perform. With corporate earnings season now underway, equities might take a breather at this point of the oversold rally until some clarity from key corporate bellwethers begins to take shape, particularly with respect to forward guidance. But despite severe global headwinds, there remain strong reasons for optimism here at home.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

Last week, the S&P 500 closed up +3.3% for the week, its best performance of the year so far. The S&P 500 large caps and Dow Jones Industrials blue chips closed above the psychological levels of 2,000 and 17,000, respectively — the first time since August — as well as above their 50-day simple moving averages. Although the Russell 2000 small cap index closed above its 50-day simple moving average, it remains more than 10% below its 52-week high set in June.

A big inspiration for bulls was the September FOMC meeting minutes that were released on Thursday afternoon showing that the Fed is concerned about persistently low inflation and the potential impact on the U.S. of the global economic slowdown. The Fed now doesn’t expect to reach its inflation goal of 2% before the end of 2018. Investors took this as a sign that the fed funds rate won’t be increased until 2016 — and likely it will be only a token one at that. The minutes also indicated that the Fed was further from approving a rate hike in September than had been broadly assumed, given the formidable global headwinds led…
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Sector Detector: Searching for solid support in the face of global headwinds

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Uncertainty about the health of the global economy led investors to flee U.S. equities during Q3, primarily driven by worries about China's growth prospects and the Federal Reserve’s decision to not raise rates. Sure, there are plenty of real and perceived headwinds, but on balance it seems that a recession here at home is not in the cards. And when you consider sentiment and the technical picture, it appears that a continuation of Friday’s bounce is in store. The question remains as to whether the seasonally strong Q4 will be able to propel the bulls through levels of resistance that have built up.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

On a total return basis, the S&P 500 large caps fell -6% during Q3, and mid- and small-cap stocks also struggled as the S&P 400 and the S&P 600 fell -8% and -9% during the quarter, respectively.  Defensive strategies outperformed, and defensive sector Utilities held up the best, while Energy and Basic Materials struggled in the face of falling commodity prices.

Global headwinds are evident, particularly in China, but even our domestic data shows weakness. ISM manufacturing report last week was barely above 50, and New Orders and Backlogs are quite weak. And then the monthly employment report disappointed. Looking at the imminent Q3 earnings reports from among S&P 500 companies, estimated earnings are expected to fall -4.7% quarter-over-quarter (the first decline since 3Q2009), while revenues are expected to fall -2.8% from last year (which would be the third quarter in a row with declines). The best reports are expected to come from Consumer Discretionary, Telecom, and Healthcare.

The numbers are growing among those forecasting either a recession or a bear market, or both. For example, Doubleline Capital’s Jeffrey Gundlach thinks risk assets like stocks and…
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Sector Detector: No rate hike translates into heightened wall of worry

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

The Fed’s decision to not raise the fed funds rate at this time was ultimately taken by the market as a no-confidence vote on our economic health, which just added to the fear and uncertainty that was already present. Rather than cheering the decision, market participants took the initial euphoric rally as a selling opportunity, and the proverbial wall of worry grew a bit higher. Nevertheless, keep in mind that markets prefer to climb a wall of worry rather than ride a crowded bandwagon, and I continue to envision higher levels for the markets after further backing-and-filling and testing of support levels (perhaps even including the August lows).

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

Well, the fed funds futures hit the mark once again, as only a 19% chance of a September hike was indicated going into the Fed’s decision, reflecting the sentiment of seasoned institutional traders who were putting real-money bets on the outcome rather than simply pontificating about it. And indeed, Chairwoman Yellen and the gang decided that potential overseas contagion slowing down our recovery was too much of a risk to begin tightening now. As Yellen said, the path of tightening is more important than the timing. As for the Fed’s two primary objectives, the unemployment rate is cooperating, having dipped to 5.1% in August, but inflation is nowhere near the 2% target and in fact is bordering on deflation — although admittedly much of that is due to oversupply in oil and other commodities, while housing prices and rents are way up.

Nevertheless, three committee members felt that lower unemployment and other economic improvements should outweigh headwinds from abroad and tumultuous markets, while another instead thinks we will need negative interest rates soon to provide new stimulus. As a reminder, the Fed last raised rates in 2006, and their zero interest…
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Sector Detector: Fear and uncertainty hamper a quick turnaround in stocks

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

For those investors who thought there might be a quick V-bottom recovery in the markets like we saw last October, they have been sorely disappointed. Last week, the Dow Industrials fell -3.2%, the S&P 500 large caps fell -3.4%, the Nasdaq was down -3.0%, and the Russell 2000 small caps dropped -2.3%.From a technical standpoint, most chartists agree that much damage has been done to the charts and the market seems quite vulnerable and likely to retest lows. Market breadth is poor. And from a fundamental standpoint, the list of concerns is long.  Nevertheless, it seems to me that on balance there are more reasons for U.S. stocks to rise than to fall over the next 12 months, with solid comparisons being made to price action and market conditions in 1998. I am not suggesting that new highs on the stock market are imminent, and indeed a breakdown below the October lows is a definite possibility in the near term. But in the longer term, the odds are strong that the global ship will be righted, with the U.S. at the helm, and corporate revenues and earnings will eventually lead stocks higher.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-ranked stocks from the top-ranked sectors.

Market overview:

Where to start? How about this. I have been doing quite a bit of traveling over the past five weeks, speaking with financial advisors in support of First Trust Portfolio’s launch of the unit investment trust that tracks Sabrient’s first mid-year Baker’s Dozen portfolio (we have been publishing a January top picks list since 2009). My latest travels have taken me to all four corners of the nation, from Orlando to Seattle to San Diego to Hartford, CT, plus Chicago and Philadelphia. And my colleagues have helped fill in when I couldn’t be two places at once, including Buffalo, Minneapolis, Little Rock, Cleveland, San Francisco, Tampa, and Charlotte. The…
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Phil's Favorites

Interview with John Rubino

I had the good fortune of visiting with my friend John Rubino from Dollar Collapse last weekend, and that led to my latest interview with John in which we discuss the likely effects of Donald Trump's plans to stimulate the US economy and "make America great again." John shares some investing ideas to help guard against the probable outcome of increased borrowing and spending and the eventual devaluation of the dollar.  

****

Ilene: What are your investing expectations and premises now that we know that Donald Trump has been elected president? Have any of your premises changed as a result?

John: Trump is looking like Obama/Bush on steroids. That...



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Zero Hedge

"Hard-Core Clinton Fanatic" Manufactured "Viral Fake News" That MSNBC Used To Discredit Wikileaks

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Authored by Glenn Greenwald via The Intercept,

The phrase “Fake News” has exploded in usage since the election, but the term is similar to other malleable political labels such as “terrorism” and “hate speech”; because the phrase lacks any clear definition, it is essentially useless except as an instrument of propaganda and...



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ValueWalk

Do Electoral College Challenges Have Any Chance Of Succeeding? Not Likely Says One Organizer

By Mark Melin. Originally published at ValueWalk.

A major anti-Trump protest is being planned for December which, in part, supports Electoral College elector revolt against the voter’s state-by-state decision. Does it have a high probability of succeeding?  Don’t count on it, says one of the movement’s organizers.

Electoral College

Image source: Wikimedia Commons

Texas Republican elector, upset with Trump tweets and policy choices, makes a stand

Texas Republican elector Christopher Suprun made waves when he said he will not be voting for Donald Trump on the basis of his judgement Trump is not qualified for the job.

“Mr. Trump goes out of...



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Market News

News You Can Use From Phil's Stock World

 

Financial Markets and Economy

OPEC, Russia see smooth road to global deal on output cut (Reuters)

Russia and Saudi Arabia said they expect OPEC and non-OPEC producers to reach an agreement on Saturday to curtail oil output and prop up prices in the first such joint move since 2001.

OPEC, Russian Oil Cut Deal Pushes Up Asian Natural Gas Prices (Forbes)

The OPEC agreement reached last week to cut oil output by 1.2 million b/d (removing around 1% ...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

Gold could blast off, if this resistance cluster holds!

Courtesy of Chris Kimble.

Below looks at the US Dollar/Gold Ratio over the past 30-years. When the ratio is heading lower, US$ is weaker than Gold/Gold stronger than US$. When the ratio is heading higher, US$ is stronger than Gold/Gold weaker than the US$

At this time, the ratio in the chart below, has created a Power of the Pattern setup, that is seldom if ever seen.

CLICK ON CHART TO ENLARGE

A rare cluster of resistance is in play for the US$/Gold ratio at (1...



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Biotech

The Medicines Company: Insider Buying

Reminder: Pharmboy and Ilene are available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

I'm seeing huge insider buying in the biotech company The Medicines Company (MDCO). The price has already moved up around 7%, but these buys are significant, in the millions of dollars range. ~ Ilene

 

 

 

Insider transaction table and buying vs. selling graphic above from insidercow.com.

Chart below from Yahoo.com

...

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Members' Corner

How To Poop At A Party?

Courtesy of Nattering Naybob.

Once again, it's "Toilet Thursday" or "Thursday in the Loo", so we follow up on Second Hand Stink with How to Poop At A Party. 

This hilarious video demonstrates how to control the Shituation when needing to Poopulate at a gathering, in no uncertain terms. 

We hope this recurring bathroom humor theme "shits" well with our readers. So please do relax, drop the cursor below, click and enjoy.

...

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Chart School

Dow Jones Gann Angle Update

Courtesy of Read the Ticker.

When the Dow Jones moves the media must have an explanation for it. However the insiders have the nod to what is going on.

The media story so far is that since the TRUMP win, managers have been rotating their portfolios to represent TRUMP trends (lower taxes, go easy on the 'too big to fail' Wall Street banks, more jobs for Americans). Prior the election the stock market was set up for a HILLARY win, due to more of the same, status quo, FED support. But....

Using Richard Ney logic, the short answer is, stocks were always going up and the election results do not matter nor would a higher 10 yr bond or lackluster fundamentals. The real story is the marke...

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Promotions

Phil's Stock World's Las Vegas Conference!

 

Come join us for the Phil's Stock World's Conference in Las Vegas!

Date:  Sunday, Feb 12, 2017 and Monday Feb 13, 2017.            

Beginning Time:  8:00 am Sunday morning

Location: Caesar's Palace in Las Vegas

Notes

Caesar's has tentatively offered us rooms for $189 on Saturday night and $129 for Sunday night. However, we have to sign the contract ASAP. We need at least 10 people to pay me via Paypal or we may lose the best rate for the rooms. (Once we are guaranteed ten attendees, I will put up instructions to call the hotel for individual rooms.)

The more people who sign up,...



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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of December 5th, 2016

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Digital Currencies

Largest US Bitcoin Exchange Is "Extremely Concerned" With IRS Crackdown Targeting Its Users

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Last Thursday we reported that in a startling development seeking to breach the privacy veil of users of America's largest bitcoin exchange, the IRS filed court papers seeking a judicial order to serve a so-called “John Doe” summons on the San Francisco-based Bitcoin platform Coinbase.

The government’s request is part of a bitcoin tax-evasion probe, and se...



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Mapping The Market

The Most Overlooked Trait of Investing Success

Via Jean-Luc

Good article on investing success:

The Most Overlooked Trait of Investing Success

By Morgan Housel

There is a reason no Berkshire Hathaway investor chides Buffett when the company has a bad quarter. It’s because Buffett has so thoroughly convinced his investors that it’s pointless to try to navigate around 90-day intervals. He’s done that by writing incredibly lucid letters to investors for the last 50 years, communicating in easy-to-understand language at annual meetings, and speaking on TV in ways that someone with no investing experience can grasp.

Yes, Buffett runs an amazing investment company. But he also runs an amazing investor company. One of the most underappreciated part of his s...



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All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: Harlan is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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FeedTheBull - Top Stock market and Finance Sites



About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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