Archive for the ‘Phil’s Favorites’ Category

Angela Merkel Defeated by a 3-Year Old Dead Boy

Courtesy of The Automatic Earth.



Marion Post Wolcott Works Progress Administration worker’s children, South Charleston, WV 1938

In the end, what should have been avoided all along, was. The refugees who were treated like subhumans for days in Hungary, and who in the end refused to be subjected to that treatment any longer and started walking to the Austrian border, are being taken as we speak to that border, on buses provided by the government in Budapest.

Meanwhile, we have all been subjected to the words and ideas of Victor Orban, the loose cannon who rules Hungary. The media largely portray the sudden change from refugees stuck on trains in Budapest train station and locations just outside of the city, to the buses that will take them to Austria and presumably Germany, as something that sprouted from Orban’s brain.

But that is not true. One can call Orban on his crazy notions, but not on decisions about the movements of the refugees. Both the decision to in effect ‘detain’ the thousands of refugees inside Hungary for days, and the decision late last night to let them leave, came from one person only: Angela Merkel. She’s the only one with sufficient power to make such things happen.

She told Orban earlier this week to stop the trains from coming west. And she told him later all refugees would have to be registered. In fact, that was a EU wide order, which is why the Czechs started putting numbers on refugees’ arms. Another image Merkel couldn’t possibly tolerate, even if she initially managed to deflect the blame for that too.

Once again, Merkel diddled till she couldn’t diddle any longer. The one and only reason why she decided to change course was the damage to her stature as a leader and politician. The images of little Aylan Kurdi dead on a beach, and the images of thousands of refugees walking to the Austrian border, had simply become too damaging to Merkel’s reputation.

So she took the opportunistic and at least somewhat cynical decision to tell Orban he could set them free.

The Syrian refugees have taken to calling her Mama Merkel. They don’t know who she is, or what role she plays.

The situation would have gotten out of hand somewhere, either in Budapest or along the highway to the…
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US Role in Europe’s Refugee Crisis; Migration in Numbers; Dead Baby Syndrome; Australia PM Promotes Hard-Line Stance

Courtesy of Mish.

Crisis in Numbers

With an influx of 800,000 migrants, per year, and rising steeply, Europe struggles with what to to with the refugees.

Here’s the Migrant Crisis in Numbers.

The EU is struggling to respond to a surge of desperate migrants, thousands of whom have perished in their attempts to seek a better life in Europe. Where are they going and where are they coming from?

The largest group of people reaching Europe through the Mediterranean or the western Balkans are Syrians fleeing a civil war, but there are also many from Eritrea and Afghanistan, as well as Kosovo and Nigeria.

EU Migrants

Italy

Greece

Hungary



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End Of Cheap Fossil Fuels Could Have More Severe Consequences Than Thought

Courtesy of Kurt Cobb at OilPrice.com

The characteristic feeling of the post-2008 world has been one of anxiety. Occasionally, that anxiety breaks out into fear as it did in the last two weeks when stock markets around the world swooned and middle class and wealthy investors had a sudden visitation from Pan, the god from whose name we get the word "panic." Pan's appearance is yet another reminder that the relative stability of the globe from the end of World War II right up until 2008 is over. We are in uncharted waters.

Here is the crux of the matter as expressed in a piece which I wrote last year:

The relentless, if zigzag, rise in financial markets for the past 150 years has been sustained by cheap fossil fuels and a benign climate. We cannot count on either from here on out….

Another thing we cannot necessarily count on is the remarkable geopolitical stability that the world experienced for two long stretches during the fossil fuel age. The first one lasted from the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815 to the beginning of World War I in 1914 (interrupted only by the brief Franco-Prussian War). The second lasted from the end of World War II in 1945 until now.

Following the withdrawal of U.S. military forces from Iraq, the Middle East has experienced increasing chaos devolving into a civil war in Syria; the rapid success of forces calling themselves the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria which are busily reshaping the borders of those two countries; and now the renewed chaos in Libya. We must add to this the Russian-Ukranian conflict. It is no accident that all of these conflicts are related to oil and natural gas.

As I view the current world landscape, I am reminded of two movies (which I've written about before) that I think capture the Zeitgeist: Melancholia and Take Shelter. In both the protagonists increasingly sense that something is terribly wrong, but can't quite put their finger on it. Everyone around them thinks they are ill or crazy. But for both protagonists, their anxiety comes from an inner vision that stems not from mere psychic disturbances, but rather from alarming real-world circumstances that are…
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News You Can Use From Phil’s Stock World

 

Financial Markets and Economy

Inflation risk neglected by smug markets (Financial Times)

Students of economic history often marvel at some of the phenomena and oddities of past eras such as feudalism, giant stone currency, tulip bubbles and the gold standard. Perhaps in the future inflation will be added to the list of quaint, incomprehensible quirks banished to the history books.

That, at least, seems to be the conclusion of many investors and economists. Aside from a motley group of stubborn doomsayers — who have loudly and wrongly predicted the outbreak of hyperinflation since the financial crisis — the feeling in markets is that inflation is not just an inconsequential danger today, but in the future too.

U.S. stocks get the jitters before jobs report (CNN)

Investors are showing signs of nerves ahead of the U.S. employment report, which could determine the timing of the first interest rate rise in a decade and shake markets around the world.

A trader works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange shortly after the market opened in New York September 1, 2015.  REUTERS/Lucas Jackson Investor flight from US stocks fails to lift bond market (Business Insider)

The "flight to safety" into bonds many expected when U.S. stocks slumped last week never took off, making big losers out of prominent fund managers and further confusing investors at a volatile time in the market.

Stocks plunged in the second half of August, largely on fears of China's worsening economy, but U.S. Treasury yields did not see the kind of safety bid that many were expecting and has been typical in times of stock-market stress in the past.

Germany's Stocks Capitulate as Decline Triggers DAX Death Cross (Bloomberg)

German equities, which have already lost most of their gains for the year, have now fallen into a bearish chart pattern known as a death cross.

Dollar weakens ahead of August jobs report (Market Watch)

The dollar weakened against the euro and yen Friday ahead of a report on U.S. job gains


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Bull Or Bear?

[Ilene: What is a bull market vs. a bear market? There doesn't seem to be general consensus besides a bull market is going up and a bear market is going down. While markets can also spend time bouncing around and going nowhere. Because the characterization requires looking backwards, I don't know how useful it is. Any thoughts?]

Bull Or Bear?

Courtesy of Bill Bonner at Acting-Man.com

The Bull Market in Stocks May Have Ended Already

As expected, Wall Street’s shills were out in force on Wednesday. And the Dow rebounded from Tuesday’s rout – up 293 points. CNBC assured investors that the “U.S. is a place you should be investing.”

kick-the-can-down-the-road

The can and the road …

 And Bloomberg explained that, “based on history” investors could expect to wait no more than four months until the stock market fully recovers:

“The S&P 500 rally that began in March 2009 has been marked by two previous corrections: a 16% sell-off from April to July in 2010, and a 19% slump over seven months a year later. The benchmark recovered within about four months of each. So if history is any guide, the market may not be back at its May peak until late December.”

Nikkei, LT

Based on Bloomberg’s “history”, the Nikkei is about 25 years “late”, and it looks like it will be even later before everything is said and done – click to enlarge.

But wait… This assumes we’re still in a bull market. As we’ve seen, two factors have been paramount in driving the bull market of the last six years: the Fed’s zero-interest-rate policy (ZIRP) and its QE programs.

And neither of those things is working for the U.S. Now. The Fed’s QE is on pause. As for ZIRP, it seems to have lost some of its zest.

It’s no wonder… As we’ve pointed out many times, lending money that didn’t exist before to people who are already deeply in debt is not a good business model. It doesn’t stimulate an economy. And it doesn’t make people better off. All it does is keep…
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Why Capital Is Fleeing China: The Crushing Costs Of Systemic Corruption

Courtesy of Charles Hugh-Smith of OfTwoMinds

Corruption isn't just bribes and influence-peddling: it's protecting the privileges of the few at the expense of the many. Rampant pollution is corruption writ large: the profits of the polluters are being protected at the expense of the millions being poisoned.

This is why capital and talent are fleeing China: systemic corruption has poisoned the nation and raised the cost of doing business. External costs such as environmental damage must be paid eventually, one way or the other.

Either the cost is paid in rising chronic illnesses, shorter lifespans and declining productivity, or profits and tax revenues must be siphoned off to clean up the damage and the sources of environmental degradation.

In large-scale industrial economies such as China and the U.S., that cost is measured not in billions of dollars but in hundreds of billions of dollars over a long period of time.

I have often noted that one key reason why the U.S. economy stagnated in the 1970s was the enormous external costs of runaway industrialization were finally paid in reduced profits and higher taxes.

China's manufacturing base simply isn't profitable enough to pay for the remedial clean-up and pollution controls needed to make China livable. That means labor and all the other sectors will have to pay the costs via higher taxes.

Pollution and environmental damage is driving away human capital, i.e. talent. This loss of talent is difficult to quantify, but it's not just foreigners who have worked in China for years who are pulling up stakes to escape pollution and repression--talented young Chinese are finding jobs elsewhere for the same reasons.

The game-changer is automation, i.e. robots and software eating the world. To understand the impact on China, let's start with unit labor costs, i.e. the cost of labor needed to produce each unit of output.

If it takes one worker an hour to assemble 10 light fixtures, the unit labor cost of each fixture is 1/10th of an hour's total compensation costs, i.e. wages and overhead. (Total compensation costs include all overhead such as vacation, healthcare, pensions, social security taxes on labor paid by the employer, etc.)

If an automated machine can produce 1,000 of the same units…
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Bye Bye Brazil

Courtesy of John Rubino.

For about a decade there, Brazil was the Latin American country that got it right. Under a socialist but apparently reasonable government they kept their budgets under control, managed the population shift from farm to city, and developed some efficient export industries that brought in plenty of hard currency. The Brazilian real held its own on foreign exchange markets and inflation was, as a result, moderate.

Then it all fell apart. The US dollar spiked, commodity prices tanked, and it was discovered that a whole range of big local players were gaming the system in various ways, sparking a corruption scandal that reaches all the way to top.

Brazil’s real is now the worst performing major currency (in a world of badly-performing major currencies), its budget deficit is 8% of GDP, the interest rate on its 10-year bonds exceeds 15%, and GDP is apparently about to fall off the table.

Brazil real Aug 2015

Brazil GDP Aug 2015

There are calls for the impeachment of the president and rising speculation that the finance minister, unable to get spending cuts through the legislature, is about to quit. The latter’s departure will remove the last prop from Brazil’s investment grade credit rating, making it even harder to borrow, necessitating even bigger spending cuts, and sending the country into a stereotypical LatAm death spiral. Just in time for it to host next year’s Olympics.

A big part of the problem is the decision by major Brazilian companies like oil giant Petroleo Brasileiro to fund their rapid growth by borrowing tens of billions of US dollars. When the real was rising and dollar interest rates were low, this strategy was a double winner. But when the dollar spiked in 2014 the true cost of those loans went through the roof.

In this sense Brazil is one of the high-profile casualties of the currency war. And with the US about to raise rates while most other countries lower theirs, it’s only going to get uglier. Which means (here’s why this matters beyond Brazil itself) the big US banks and other major creditors are looking at multi-billion-dollar losses in 2016. Turns out that China has been on a lending spree in Latin America, extending more than $100 billion in credit to various state-run oil and mining companies since 2005. And whenever there’s a South-of-the-Border crisis, Citigroup, Goldman and JP Morgan are in…
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Establishment Survey +173K Jobs, Private Jobs +140,000; Unemployment Rate 5.1%

Courtesy of Mish.

Initial Reaction

The establishment survey came in a weaker than expected 173,000 job. The Bloomberg Consensus estimate was 223,000 jobs.

However, the preceding two months were revised up by 44,000 and wages were strong. Bloomberg provides a nice summation of the strengths and weaknesses.

The headline may not look it but there's plenty of strength in the August employment report. Nonfarm payrolls rose only 173,000 which is at the low-end estimate, but the two prior months are now revised up a total of 44,000. The unemployment rate fell 2 tenths to 5.1 percent which is below the low end estimate and the lowest of the recovery, since April 2008. And wages are strong, with average hourly earnings up 0.3 percent for a 2.2 percent year-on-year rate that's 1 tenth higher than July. Debate will definitely be lively at the September 17 FOMC!

Private payroll growth proved very weak, at only 140,000. Government added 33,000 jobs vs July's 21,000. Manufacturing, held back by weak exports and trouble in energy equipment, shed a steep 17,000 jobs followed by a 9,000 loss for mining which is getting hit by low commodity prices. A plus is a 33,000 rise in professional & business services and a respectable 11,000 rise in the temporary help subcomponent. This subcomponent is considered a leading indicator for long-term labor demand. Retail rose 11,000 with vehicle dealers, who have been very busy, adding 2,000 jobs following July's gain of 11,000.

Seasonality, especially the timing of the beginning of the school year, always plays an outsized role in August employment data which are often revised higher. Policy makers are certain to take this into consideration at this month's FOMC. There's something for everybody in this report which won't likely settle expectations whether the Fed lifts off or not this month.

Revisions

The employment change for June revised up from +231,000 to +245,000, and the change for July revised up from +215,000 to +245,000. Incorporating revisions, employment has increased by an average 221,000 per month over the past 3 months.

Wages

Average hourly earnings for all employees on private, nonfarm payrolls rose by 8 cents in August, following a 6-cent gain in July. Hourly earnings are up 2.2 percent over the year.


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Not So Fast With Those “Rising Wages”

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Perhaps the biggest catalyst why Fed Funds rate increased following today's payrolls miss is not so much the prior monthly payroll revisions but that after stagnating for months, August average hourly wages rose by 0.3%, the biggest sequential increase since January. The reason why pundits are focused on this number is because Yellen has repeatedly noted that with the unemployment having become utterly meaningless as a result of the 94 million Americans not in the labor force, the only indicator of labor slack is wages, and whether they are finally – after 5 years of waiting – rising.

Well, for the headline-scanning algos who saw the 0.3% number, they were although a Y/Y chart reveals a very different picture:

That said, a quick dig through the data reveals that as we first reported almost half a year ago, there are two vastly different pictures emerging when looking at the two key segment of the US labor force: the supervisors, managers and other workers in position of power, and everyone else.

First, this is how wages for the supervisory workers looked like: nothing but blue skies here, and rising at 3.7%, this was in line with the biggest wage gains in the past decade.

And if this was indicative of the overall work force, the Fed could indeed claim mission accomplished and hike not 0.25% but 2.5%.

There is a problem: supervisory workers only make up 17.5% of the US work force. As such, their wage gains are anything but indicative of the vast 140 or so million US workers.

What about the wages for the remaining 82.5% of US workers: the non-supervisory one. Here is the answer.

This means that on an inflation adjusted basis, 82% of the US population can't even keep up with inflation!

So before anyone decides that the Fed is one and done in September based on the "strong" August average hourly wages, if the Fed is looking at the real chart that matters, that of non-supervisory workers, it will be zero and nothing for a long, long time.

Source: BLS





News You Can Use From Phil’s Stock World

 

Financial Markets and Economy

The Jobs Report and the August Curse: Jobs Day Guide (Bloomberg)

The stakes couldn't be higher for the August employment report, even though the month has typically been cursed by disappointment.

For Federal Reserve officials, who are trying to gauge the U.S. economy's prospects as they consider raising interest rates in less than two weeks, have already been thrown a curve ball — global economic malaise and reeling financial markets.

Canada Oil Sands Fork Over Billions for 500,000 Unneeded Barrels (Bloomberg)

The last place oil producers want to be when prices plummet to profit-demolishing lows is midstream on a billion-dollar project in one of the costliest parts of the planet to extract crude.

The state of global monetary policy in one chart (Business Insider)

 The big question hanging over markets right now is the Federal Reserve. 

Will the Fed raise interest rates in September? October? December? Never?

cotd monetary policy

As volatility soars, this obscure trading strategy draws Wall Street’s ire (Market Watch)

When markets fall fast and hard, investors look for something to blame. This time around, a lot of the ire is focused on a trading strategy known as risk parity.

The most high-profile accusation came from Leon Cooperman, founder of hedge fund Omega Advisors. According to the Financial Times, Cooperman and his partner Steven Einhorn told investors in a Sept. 1 letter that fundamental factors, including turmoil in China and jitters over the Federal Reserve interest-rate outlook can’t fully explain the magnitude and velocity of the stock market’s drop in August.

<p>Dirty power.</p> Photographer: Luke Sharrett/BloombergLet Coal Die a Natural Death (Bloomberg View)

Coal-fired electricity is becoming ever less profitable. That's the good news — or it should be, since it gives power companies greater incentive to embrace cleaner and cheaper sources of energy. 

But not every energy company is content to let the market guide its decision-making. In a role reversal, at least one energy company is asking


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Phil's Favorites

Angela Merkel Defeated by a 3-Year Old Dead Boy

Courtesy of The Automatic Earth.


Marion Post Wolcott Works Progress Administration worker’s children, South Charleston, WV 1938

In the end, what should have been avoided all along, was. The refugees who were treated like subhumans for days in Hungary, and who in the end refused to be subjected to that treatment any longer and started walking to the Austrian border, are being taken as we speak to that border, on buses provided by the government in Budapest.

Meanwhile, we have all been subjected to the words and ideas of Victor Orban, the loose cannon who rules Hungary. The media largely portray the sudden change from refugees stuck on trains in Budapest train station and locations just outside of the city, to the buses that will take them to Austria and presumab...



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Zero Hedge

The Failed Moral Argument For A "Living Wage"

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by Ryan McMaken via The Mises Institute,

With Labor Day upon us, newspapers across the US will be printing op-eds calling for a mandated “living wage” and higher wages in general. In many cases, advocates for a living wage argue for outright mandates on wages; that is, a minimum wage set as an arbitrary level determined by policymakers to be at a level that makes housing, food, and health care “affordable.”

Behind this effort is a philosophical claim that employers are morally obligated to pay “a living wage” to employees, so they can afford necessi...



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Chart School

Stock Market Song for Aug 2015

Courtesy of Read the Ticker.

Time for a funny, need to loosen up a bit!

This is a song from a New Zealand Band called SplitEnz founded by Tim Finn. Tim Finn brother Neil also joined the band, and latter left to form the band called Crowded House.

The song is I SEE RED, and those in the market are seeing a lot of RED these days on their trading screen.





NOTE: readtheticker.com does allow users to load objects and text on charts, however some annotations are by a free third party image tool named Paint.net

Investing Quote...

......



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All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: David is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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Market News

News You Can Use From Phil's Stock World

 

Financial Markets and Economy

Inflation risk neglected by smug markets (Financial Times)

Students of economic history often marvel at some of the phenomena and oddities of past eras such as feudalism, giant stone currency, tulip bubbles and the gold standard. Perhaps in the future inflation will be added to the list of quaint, incomprehensible quirks banished to the history books.

That, at least, seems to be the conclusion of many investors and economists. Aside from a motley group of stubborn doomsayers — who have loudly and wrongly predicted the outbreak of hyperinflation since the financial crisis — the feeling in markets is that inflation is not just an inconsequential dange...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

Shorting Russell 2000, Joe says nice looking breakout

Courtesy of Chris Kimble.

CLICK ON CHART TO ENLARGE

The Russell 2000 inverse ETF (RWM) has had a rough 6-years, falling a ton in price ($500 to $62). If one has owned if for a long-time, its not been fun to say the least.

A couple of weeks ago RWM broke above triple resistance at (1) above and Premium Members bought the ETF on the breakout.

At this time the price action looks ok.

Should RWM break above $66, it has the potential to take off!

If you would like to receive this type of information on a daily basis, I would be honored if you were a Premium Memb...



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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of August 31st, 2015

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Sabrient

Sector Detector: Finally, market capitulation gives bulls a real test of conviction, plus perhaps a buying opportunity

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

The dark veil around China is creating a little too much uncertainty for investors, with the usual fear mongers piling on and sending the vast buy-the-dip crowd running for the sidelines until the smoke clears. Furthermore, Sabrient’s fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings have been flashing near-term defensive signals. The end result is a long overdue capitulation event that has left no market segment unscathed in its mass carnage. The historically long technical consolidation finally came to the point of having to break one way or the other, and it decided to break hard to the downside, actually testing the lows from last ...



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ValueWalk

Some Hedge Funds "Hedged" During Stock Market Sell Off, Others Not As Risk Focused

By Mark Melin. Originally published at ValueWalk.

With the VIX index jumping 120 percent on a weekly basis, the most in its history, and with the index measuring volatility or "fear" up near 47 percent on the day, one might think professional investors might be concerned. While the sell off did surprise some, certain hedge fund managers have started to dip their toes in the water to buy stocks they have on their accumulation list, while other algorithmic strategies are actually prospering in this volatile but generally consistently trending market.

Stock market sell off surprises some while others were prepared and are hedged prospering

While so...



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Digital Currencies

Bitcoin Battered After "Governance Coup"

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Naysyers are warning that the recent plunge in Bitcoin prices - from almost $318 at its peak during the Greek crisis, to $221 yesterday - is due to growing power struggle over the future of the cryptocurrency that is dividing its lead developers. On Saturday, a rival version of the current software was released by two bitcoin big guns. As Reuters reports, Bitcoin XT would increase the block size to 8 megabytes enabling more transactions to be processed every second. Those who oppose Bitcoin XT say the bigger block size jeopardizes the vision of a decentralized payments system that bitcoin is built on with some believing ...



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Pharmboy

Baxter's Spinoff

Reminder: Pharmboy and Ilene are available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Baxter Int. (BAX) is splitting off its BioSciences division into a new company called Baxalta. Shares of Baxalta will be given as a tax-free dividend, in the ratio of one to one, to BAX holders on record on June 17, 2015. That means, if you want to receive the Baxalta dividend, you need to buy the stock this week (on or before June 12).

The Baxalta Spinoff

By Ilene with Trevor of Lowenthal Capital Partners and Paul Price

In its recent filing with the SEC, Baxter provides:

“This information statement is being ...



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Mapping The Market

An update on oil proxies

Courtesy of Jean-Luc Saillard

Back in December, I wrote a post on my blog where I compared the performances of various ETFs related to the oil industry. I was looking for the best possible proxy to match the moves of oil prices if you didn't want to play with futures. At the time, I concluded that for medium term trades, USO and the leveraged ETFs UCO and SCO were the most promising. Longer term, broader ETFs like OIH and XLE might make better investment if oil prices do recover to more profitable prices since ETF linked to futures like USO, UCO and SCO do suffer from decay. It also seemed that DIG and DUG could be promising if OIH could recover as it should with the price of oil, but that they don't make a good proxy for the price of oil itself. 

Since...



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Promotions

Watch the Phil Davis Special on Money Talk on BNN TV!

Kim Parlee interviews Phil on Money Talk. Be sure to watch the replays if you missed the show live on Wednesday night (it was recorded on Monday). As usual, Phil provides an excellent program packed with macro analysis, important lessons and trading ideas. ~ Ilene

 

The replay is now available on BNN's website. For the three part series, click on the links below. 

Part 1 is here (discussing the macro outlook for the markets) Part 2 is here. (discussing our main trading strategies) Part 3 is here. (reviewing our pick of th...

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Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

"Hello PSW Members –

This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743

Thank you for you time!




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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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