Archive for the ‘Phil’s Favorites’ Category

Global Shipping Rates Run Dry

 

Global Shipping Rates Run Dry

Courtesy of Dana Lyons

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A key index of global shipping prices is nearly 50% below its previous record low level.

We swore we wouldn’t devote any more Charts Of The Day to the Baltic Dry Index (BDI) after it broke its all-time low in November. Things are really getting out of hand now, though, so it deserves at least a mention. The previous record low in the BDI was 553, set back in 1986. Upon breaking that low in November, the BDI continued to crater. As of today, the Baltic Dry Index is listed at 303.00 – nearly a full 50% below its previous all-time low.

 

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So what is the Baltic Dry Index? The BDI is a composite of various global shipping rates tied to the movement of raw materials. Why is it important? It can serve as a barometer of the global trade environment, as well as a measure of inflation based on global trade. If that is the case, the trade environment would appear downright dismal.

Now, of course much of the input into the BDI comes from the price of raw materials. Considering the deflationary spiral in commodities, the drop in the BDI to all-time lows shouldn’t be a shock. However, the depths that the index is now plumbing is quite alarming and suggests trouble in the global trade picture.

It would also suggest perhaps that the deflationary pressure is not just a supply issue. Consider every prior drop in the Baltic Dry Index down to the 500-600 level. Each time, the index immediately jumped as if latent demand was just waiting for those lower prices. That development has not yet occurred this time around, even as prices are reaching 45% below the previous record low.

The Baltic Dry Index has become a trendy thing to mention in recent years when discussing global market and economic conditions. The truth is, nobody really ever knows for sure what the broader message is behind the index’s behavior. That said, this recent plunge is making it quite difficult to conceive that it means anything positive in terms of the global


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Pros & Cons Of Obama’s $10/Barrel Oil Tax

All humor aside, doesn't it seem like a spectacularly bad time to be proposing a tax on oil? 

Pros & Cons Of Obama's $10/Barrel Oil Tax

Courtesy of ZeroHedge

With President Obama unveiling his $10/Barrel tax plan to fund government-subsidized public transportatation (versus an individual's choice over his method transportation), we thought a glimpse at the pros and cons of such a choice may be useful…

Weighing factors such as convenience, time commitment, and enviornmental impact, deciding whether to commute via your own fossil-fuel-powered car or government-provided unicorn-fueled public transportation can be difficult.

Here is a side-by-side comparison of the two options…

Source: The Onion





January Jobs Picture Defies Recession Chatter

Today's Disconnect: Market indexes are experiencing total "Bloodbathery," while the jobs picture doesn't look all that bad.  

January Jobs Picture Defies Recession Chatter

Courtesy of 

If there is to be an imminent recession, then jobs are an even more lagging indicator than ever.

Because this morning’s non-farm payroll report showed a continuation of two important trends: wages are rising and participation in the labor force is growing as workers come off the sidelines.

4.9% headline unemployment combined with rising average hourly earnings (2.5% growth this month) will do that. A tighter employment situation should lead to greater participation and higher pay. The mechanism is functioning.

Here are the details, via Wall Street Journal’s live blog.

As for market reaction, who the f*** knows. I’ve lost track of whether good news was bad or good at this point.

Anyone who tells you they know how the dollar, the 10-year yield or the S&P 500 are going to zig or zag off a jobs report these days is just making it up.





Weekend Reading: The Awakening

Courtesy of Lance Roberts of Real Investment Advice

Over the last two months, the deterioration in the economic data has become much more prevalent despite the ongoing hopes of the more “bullishly biased” mainstream media.

Furthermore, as I predicted early last year, the Federal Reserve likely made a mistake in hiking interest rates when the economic and inflationary backdrop were exceedingly weak. To wit:

“The real concern for investors and individuals is the actual economy. There is clearly something amiss within the economic landscape, and the ongoing decline of inflationary pressures longer term is likely telling us just that. The big question for the Fed is how to get out of the potential trap they have gotten themselves into without cratering the economy, and the financial markets, in the process.

It is my expectation, unless these deflationary trends reverse course in very short order, that if the Fed raises rates it will invoke a fairly negative response from both the markets and economy.”

And so…that has come to pass. Of course, for me, since I am deemed a “bear” for being a “realist”, my writings are more like a “tree falling in the woods.”  The only problem is that just because no one hears it, doesn’t mean the damage to individuals isn’t just as real.

This weekend’s reading list is a compilation of articles discussing “The Awakening” by many to the real problems currently plaguing the economy, the markets, and the Fed.

While it is said “it is better to be late than never,” such sentiment doesn’t sit well with individuals when they are told after the fact what they should have known before hand. But then again, since the turn of the century, “getting back to even” has apparently become a new investing strategy.

1) It’s Time To Worry About The Economy by Matt Phillips via Quartz

“And now the brightness in the US appears to be dimming, at least a bit. The latest benchmark update on the US manufacturing sector shows activity continued to decline in January, marking four straight months of contraction. The strong US dollar—it’s up about 13% against the currencies of major trading partners—is a key culprit.”

Quartz-manufacturing-020416

But Also Read:  Citi’s Crash…
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Video Shows Tens Of Thousands Massing At Turkey Border As Russia, Iran Bear Down On Key Syrian City

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

On Thursday we brought you the latest from Syria, where Hezbollah and the IRGC have encircled Aleppo and cut off rebel supply lines to Turkey.

It was months in the making, but it now appears that the city – Syria’s second largest – will soon be retaken by forces loyal to Bashar al-Assad. As we’ve explained in the past, that would effectively restore the President’s grip on power as he would effectively control most of the country’s urban centers – even if that “control” is tenuous.

Eastern Syria is of course a different story entirely, as ISIS is dug in at Raqqa, the group’s self-styled capital. If the rebels lose Aleppo, it will represent a huge blow to the effort to topple Assad’s government. Saudi Arabia and Turkey know this, which is presumably why Erdogan was busy criticizing the Russian airstrikes that have facilitated the Hezbollah advance yesterday and why Riyadh now says it’s prepared to send in ground troops (to “fight ISIS”).

Now, as the Russian air campaign continues unabated and Shiite fighters advance on the city, civilians are fleeing what they anticipate will be a bloody battle.

"The Russian (air) cover continues night and day, there were more than 250 air strikes on this area in one day," Hassan Haj Ali, head of Liwa Suqour al-Jabal, a group that fights under the umbrella of the Free Syrian Army, said.

Tens of thousands of Syrians fled an intensifying Russian assault around Aleppo on Friday, and aid workers said they feared the city which once held two million people could soon fall under a full government siege,Reuters writes. “The last 24 hours saw government troops and their Lebanese and Iranian allies fully encircle the countryside north of Aleppo and cut off the main supply route linking the city – Syria's largest before the war – to Turkey [who says] the aim is to starve the population into submission.”

Now obviously that’s ridiculous. The “aim” is to keep the rebels (some of whom are ISIS fighters) from obtaining guns and TOWs from Turkey where the government in Ankara…
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It’s Groundhog Day Again For The Rising Rates Crowd

Courtesy of Dana Lyons

Yet another attempt at rising interest rates has spectacularly fizzled out.

Well, once again the critter popped its head above the surface before promptly returning to its familiar territory down in the depths. I am, of course, referring to U.S. Treasury yields. After a decade of consensus forecasts for rising rates, and countless head-fakes higher along the way, one would think that market participants would have learned their lesson by now as it pertains to expectations for rising rates. Yet, if I can mix metaphors, like Charlie Brown, they keep flailing at that football only to see Lucy yank it away every time.

We last covered the topic on November 6, 2015, specifically relating to 2-Year Treasury yields. At the time, the market was beginning to price in the likelihood of the first Fed rate hike in 9 years and the 2-Year was undergoing its most convincing “breakout” in years. Still, we cautioned investors that (like Bill Murray in Groundhog Day”), we’ve seen this drill many, many times in recent years. Indeed we concluded with this warning (along with the accompanying cartoon):

if you are leaning heavily towards a new “rising rate” regime: watch out that Lucy doesn’t yank that football away again.

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The warning has, not surprisingly, been validated. After rates continued to rise through the time of the December rate hike and toward the end of the year, they have since pulled an about-face. And, in fact, the 2-Year yield has come all the way back to the spot (around 0.74%) from where it launched its year-end rally. Thus, for all of the effort spent by prices (or by pundits) toward the notion of rising rates, the 2-Year yield is essentially no higher than it was a year ago.

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What’s the moral of this story? How about, stop expecting rates to rise. Yes, the Fed can have a demonstrable effect on the short-end of the yield curve especially. Therefore, if they continue their campaign of raising rates, we may actually see short-term rates rise for longer than 2 months. However, that is not our expectation.

Longer-term yields seem even less likely to rise, given the less-than-stellar state of the economy, as well as…
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The Bear Is At The Door, Part 1: Momentum Stocks Getting Crushed

Courtesy of John Rubino.

One of the common transitions that bull markets go through as they age and die is a narrowing of leadership. As formerly strong sectors begin to stall out, investors shift into whatever is still looking good — that is, whatever still has upward momentum. Eventually capital becomes concentrated in just a few names. Then those stocks roll over and the game ends.

This time around Big Tech was the final category of momentum play, and it ended up attracting astounding amounts of money from both the usual suspects like hedge funds and some new suckers like the Central Bank of Switzerland, now a major holder of Apple shares.

But now Big Tech has lost the Big Mo:

Tech Feb 16

 

Amazon, for instance, tripled in 2015, and has now given back about half of that move. Google hit an all-time high very recently and is now falling like a stone. But today’s big story is LinkedIn, which is, as this is written, down 40% on disappointing forward guidance.

Here’s a piece from an analyst who offers a strategy for playing this sudden reversal of fortune:

Momentum Stocks Are Broken. How Do We Profit From It?

Momentum is a word that gets thrown around a lot. I personally like to measure momentum using a 14-period relative strength index (see here), but different people have different definitions. Fine. For today, we’ll argue that “momentum” stocks are those listed in the MSCI USA Momentum Index.

https://www.ishares.com/us/literature/fact-sheet/mtum-ishares-msci-usa-momentum-factor-etf-fund-fact-sheet-en-us.pdf Looking at these stocks as a group, I think they are going to continue to get destroyed going forward, particularly relative to the rest of the market.

First of all, forget this whole FANG thing. I don’t know who made that up or why people like to limit it to just 4 stocks. I think it’s stupid. They have nothing to do with one another and there should be others included in the list. In fact, in November I wrote a piece about how FANG stocks are this cycles Four Horseman (See here) http://allstarcharts.com/is-fang-this-cycles-four-horsemen/ and was further evidence at the time that made us very bearish U.S. Stocks heading into December and January. That obviously worked out


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Hillary Clinton Will Not Commit to Releasing Transcripts of Her Speeches to Wall Street

Courtesy of Pam Martens.

Senator Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton at the February 4, 2016 Democrratic Debate at the University of New Hampshire in Durham

Senator Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton at the February 4, 2016 Democratic Debate at the University of New Hampshire in Durham

The Hillary Clinton presidential campaign has a new strategy to get Senator Bernie Sanders to shut up about the unseemly mountains of money Wall Street has showered on her and Bill Clinton throughout their careers: in campaign funds, in speaking fees, in home mortgages, and in donations to their charity, the Clinton Global Initiative. (Details here.) The new strategy is to effectively socialize Sanders to silence by embarrassing him every time he brings up the subject.

Before Clinton took the stage last night at the MSNBC Democratic Debate at the University of New Hampshire in Durham, her Press Secretary, Brian Fallon, and Campaign Manager, Robby Mook, met with reporters from Bloomberg News to complain about Sanders’ innuendos that Hillary Clinton can be bought by Wall Street.

According to a report at Bloomberg, Fallon stated at a Bloomberg Politics breakfast earlier yesterday that if Sanders is “going to raise the specter of contributions that have been made to her from the financial industry, he should have to complete the thought, and lay out exactly what he’s accusing her of.” Mook chimed in to challenge the idea that Hillary could be bought by Wall Street by noting that “hedge fund billionaires” are “attacking” her in campaign ads. (It should be noted that other hedge fund billionaires, like George Soros and Paloma Partners’ David Sussman, have contributed over $10 million to Hillary’s Super Pac, Priorities USA, which raked in over $41 million last year, 90 percent of which came from a handful of super wealthy individuals. Sanders has no aligned Super Pac.)

Hillary continued the strategy to silence Sanders on stage last night with this:

“I think it’s time to end the very artful smear that you and your campaign have been carrying out in recent weeks.”

Sanders will, hopefully, not be foolish enough to fall for this socializing to silence routine from a bare-knuckled career politician like Hillary. What he should have said is this:

First, we’re not talking about modest sums. We’re talking about $250,000 and $300,000 speaking fees for one…
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The Chart Of Doom: When Private Credit Stops Expanding…

Courtesy of Charles Hugh-Smith of Of Two Minds

Few question the importance of private credit in the global economy. When households and businesses are borrowing to expand production and buy homes, vehicles, etc., the economy expands smartly.

When private credit shrinks--that is, as businesses and households stop borrowing more and start paying down existing debt--the result is at best stagnation and at worst recession or depression.

Courtesy of Market Daily Briefing, here is The Chart of Doom, a chart of private credit in the five primary economies:

 

Why is this The Chart of Doom? It's fairly obvious that private credit is contracting in Japan and the Eurozone and stagnant in the U.K.

As for the U.S.: after trillions of dollars in bank bailouts and additional liquidity, and $8 trillion in deficit spending, private credit in the U.S. managed a paltry $1.5 trillion increase in the seven years since the 2008 financial meltdown.

Compare this to the strong growth from the mid-1990s up to 2008.

This chart makes it clear that the sole prop under the global "recovery" since 2008-09 has been private credit growth in China. From $4 trillion to over $21 trillion in seven years--no wonder bubbles have been inflated globally.

Combine this expansion of private credit in China with the expansion of local government and other state-sector debt (state-owned enterprises, SOEs, etc.) and you have the makings of a global bubble machine.

In other words, the faltering global "recovery" and all the tenuous asset bubbles around the world both depend on a continued hyper-velocity rocket rise in China's private credit. What are the odds of this happening? Aren't the signs that this rocket ship has burned its available fuel abundant?

Three out of the five major economies are already experiencing stagnant or negative private credit growth. Three down, two to go. Helicopter money--government issued "free money" to households--is no replacement for private credit expansion.

Once private credit rolls over in China and the U.S., the global recession will start its rapid slide down the Seneca Cliff: The Global Economy Could Fall Farther and Faster Than Pundits Expect.





News You Can Use From Phil’s Stock World

 

Financial Markets and Economy

Tech-stock wreck destroys $514B this year (USA Today)

The bad year for stocks is getting worse by the minute – and tech investors are feeling the brunt of the pain.

The 462 information technology stocks in the broadRussell 3000 index have shredded a total of $514 billion this year thanks to their average decline of 13.4%, according to a USA TODAY analysis of data from S&P Capital IQ.

Citi: 'We Should All Fear Oilmageddon' (Bloomberg)

A feedback loop of the U.S. dollar, crude, capital flows, and emerging markets.

pla screamsThe world's biggest steel maker just lost $7.9 billion (Business Insider)

Another day, another two scalps for the commodity price crash.

Two huge resources firms reported results on Friday, and you can add both to the pile of giants getting crushed by the falling price of raw materials.

ArcelorMittal, the world's biggest steelmaker, and BG Group, the FTSE 100-listed oil giant, both took big hits last year, according to financial results released on Friday morning.

European stocks becalmed as investors await U.S. jobs report (Market Watch)

Stocks across Europe sought firm direction Friday, as investors waited for the high-profile monthly U.S. jobs report and faced the prospect of a losing week for European equities.

The Stoxx Europe 600 rose 0.1% to 329.05, but has been darting in and out of positive territory throughout the session. For the week, however, the index looked solidly in the red, as it is poised to drop 3.6%. That would break two previous weeks of gains.

China's Foreign Reserves Poised for Record Drop on Yuan Defense (Bloomberg)

China's foreign-exchange reserves, already at a three-year low, are poised to post a second consecutive record monthly drop as policy makers intervene to support the yuan.

China cracks down on illegal GM crops ahead of Syngenta deal (Business Insider)

Chinese officials have issued warnings to seed dealers and farmers not to use unapproved genetically modified seeds in the country's main crop belt, shortly after


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Phil's Favorites

Global Shipping Rates Run Dry

 

Global Shipping Rates Run Dry

Courtesy of Dana Lyons

A key index of global shipping prices is nearly 50% below its previous record low level.

We swore we wouldn’t devote any more Charts Of The Day to the Baltic Dry Index (BDI) after it broke its all-time low in November. Things are really getting out of hand now, though, so it deserves at least a mention. The previous record low in the BDI was 553, set back in 1986. Upon breaking that low in November, the BDI continued to crater. As of today, the Baltic Dry Index is listed at 303.00 – nearly a full 50% below its previous all-time low.

 

 

So what is the ...



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Zero Hedge

And Now "Some Important News About JPMorgan's New Cash Policies"

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Want to deposit cash at JPMorgan Chase? Then prepare to be treated if not like a criminal, then certainly a suspect of a very serious crime. The charge: being in possession of that "barbarous relic" known as cash.

Soon, as cash becomes increasingly frowned upon, cash deposits will be slowly but surely phased out in their entirety forcing those few savers left in Obama's grand economic "recovery" experiment, to engage in commerce only in a way that allow...



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All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: Harlan is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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Kimble Charting Solutions

S&P could reach 1,600 if this gives way, says Joe Friday

Courtesy of Chris Kimble.

CLICK ON CHART TO ENLARGE

S&P 500 tops in 2000 and 2007 took place 91 one months apart. Did another top take place 91 months after the 2007 top. So far it looks very possible.

If you double that time frame, you get 182 months. What is the odds that the NDX 100 topped 182 months after the 2000 high, at the SAME price it hit in 2000?

We applied monthly momentum to the charts above, reflecting that momentum for the S&P is back at 2000 and 2007 highs and turning lower and the momentum for the NDX is back at 2000 levels.

...

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Market News

News You Can Use From Phil's Stock World

 

Financial Markets and Economy

Tech-stock wreck destroys $514B this year (USA Today)

The bad year for stocks is getting worse by the minute - and tech investors are feeling the brunt of the pain.

The 462 information technology stocks in the broadRussell 3000 index have shredded a total of $514 billion this year thanks to their average decline of 13.4%, according to a USA TODAY analysis of data from S&P Capital IQ.

Citi: 'We Should All Fear Oilmageddon' (Bloomberg)

A feedback loop of the U.S. dollar, crude, capital flows, and emerging markets....



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ValueWalk

Why Most Investors Fail in the Stock Market

 

Why Most Investors Fail in the Stock Market

Courtesy of ValueWalk, by  

Throughout the past 30 days of wild volatility, here’s what I didn’t do.

Panic. Worry. Sell.

In fact, the best I did was add to a couple of positions yesterday. The world was already in an uncertain state for the past 3+ years. It’s just that with the market rising, we pushed the issue to the back of our  mind and ignored it.

If you read Howard Marks latest memo, ...



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Insider Scoop

Tyson Foods' Stock Ticks Higher Following Q1 Print

Courtesy of Benzinga.

Related TSN 7 Stocks You Should Be Watching Today Earnings Scheduled For February 5, 2016 Tyson Foods beats by $0.26, misses on revenue (Seeking Alpha)

Shares of Tyson Foods, Inc. (NYSE: TSN) were trading higher by more nearly 4 percent early Friday morning after the company reported its ...



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Chart School

Pause in Action

Courtesy of Declan.

Small Gains as indecision held sway. The S&P finished inside the range of last Friday's breakout and held rising support, but the index did the minimum to pacify bulls.


The Nasdaq breakout has eased alongside former resistance turned support. Volume was lighter, and the spinning top finish marks indecision. While Thursday's action offered no side an advantage, a push towards 4,900 would appear to be the favoured path.


The Russell 2000 is caught inside t...

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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of February 1st, 2016

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Digital Currencies

2016 Theme #3: The Rise Of Independent (Non-State) Crypto-Currencies

Courtesy of Charles Hugh-Smith at Of Two Minds

A number of systemic, structural forces are intersecting in 2016. One is the rise of non-state, non-central-bank-issued crypto-currencies.

We all know money is created and distributed by governments and central banks. The reason is simple: control the money and you control everything.

The invention of the blockchain and crypto-currencies such as Bitcoin have opened the door to non-state, non-central-bank currencies--money that is global and independent of any state or central bank, or indeed, any bank, as crypto-currencies are structurally peer-to-peer, meaning they don't require a bank to function: people can exchange crypto-currencies to pay for goods and services without a bank acting as a clearinghouse for all these transactions.

This doesn't just open t...



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Sabrient

Sector Detector: New Year brings new hope after bulls lose traction to close 2015

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Chart via Finviz

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Last year, the S&P 500 large caps closed 2015 essentially flat on a total return basis, while the NASDAQ 100 showed a little better performance at +8.3% and the Russell 2000 small caps fell -5.9%. Overall, stocks disappointed even in the face of modest expectations, especially the small caps as market leadership was mostly limited to a handful of large and mega-cap darlings.

Notably, the full year chart for the S&P 500 looks very much like 2011. It got off to a good start, drifted sideways for...



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Promotions

PSW is more than just stock talk!

 

We know you love coming here for our Stocks & Options education, strategy and trade ideas, and for Phil's daily commentary which you can't live without, but there's more!

PhilStockWorld.com features the most important and most interesting news items from around the web, all day, every day!

News: If you missed it, you can probably find it in our Market News section. We sift through piles of news so you don't have to.   

If you are looking for non-mainstream, provocatively-narrated news and opinion pieces which promise to make you think -- we feature Zero Hedge, ...



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Pharmboy

Baxter's Spinoff

Reminder: Pharmboy and Ilene are available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Baxter Int. (BAX) is splitting off its BioSciences division into a new company called Baxalta. Shares of Baxalta will be given as a tax-free dividend, in the ratio of one to one, to BAX holders on record on June 17, 2015. That means, if you want to receive the Baxalta dividend, you need to buy the stock this week (on or before June 12).

The Baxalta Spinoff

By Ilene with Trevor of Lowenthal Capital Partners and Paul Price

In its recent filing with the SEC, Baxter provides:

“This information statement is being ...



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Mapping The Market

An update on oil proxies

Courtesy of Jean-Luc Saillard

Back in December, I wrote a post on my blog where I compared the performances of various ETFs related to the oil industry. I was looking for the best possible proxy to match the moves of oil prices if you didn't want to play with futures. At the time, I concluded that for medium term trades, USO and the leveraged ETFs UCO and SCO were the most promising. Longer term, broader ETFs like OIH and XLE might make better investment if oil prices do recover to more profitable prices since ETF linked to futures like USO, UCO and SCO do suffer from decay. It also seemed that DIG and DUG could be promising if OIH could recover as it should with the price of oil, but that they don't make a good proxy for the price of oil itself. 

Since...



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Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

"Hello PSW Members –

This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743

Thank you for you time!




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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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