Posts Tagged ‘valuations’

WILL THE “CULT OF THE EQUITY” INVESTOR DIE?

WILL THE “CULT OF THE EQUITY” INVESTOR DIE?

Courtesy of The Pragmatic Capitalist 

Portrait of a Kodiak Bear

RBS recently published a dramatic and very bearish research note that described equity investors as “the world’s worst cult”.  While I thought the note was a bit over the top it did raise some interesting and thought provoking topics.  More specifically, they said:

“The big turnover in the US economy will lead to dramatic turns down in valuations we suspect – and may finally destroy the world’s worst cult: the cult of the equity, which has no basis in fact, or history, but yet seems universally accepted.”

The credit crisis is a reflection of our excesses and this is best reflected in the markets.   We have become a society that values those who get rich quick over those who create sustainable and productive businesses.  This is nowhere more apparent than it is in the financial sector which has become the epicenter of the crisis.  Our bloated financial sector steals our best minds and puts them to work doing little of real value while rewarding them excessively.  The excess growth of this industry has coincided with Main Street’s obsession with Wall Street.  While the buy side reaps the rewards of 2 & 20 or 2% funds fees for what is effectively an index fund (sorry mutual fund managers) the sell side reels the small investor in with the myth of becoming the next Warren Buffett.  The result?   What RBS would call the worst cult in history – an economy that has become transfixed with making money by effectively doing nothing.

We have spent more than we have and lived well beyond our means.  We buy every new Apple product, houses because we believe it is a right and not a privilege, and think of debt as a way to keep up with the way of life that God bestowed upon us.  It is not sustainable and this is becoming clear to us all as the economy appears to be in a perpetual stall.  The worst part in all of this is that we have tried with all our might to prop up a sector that has failed us all.  While Main Street struggles Wall Street is back to their old tricks.

banks WILL THE CULT OF THE EQUITY INVESTOR DIE?

As a nation I sometimes wonder if a depression wouldn’t set us straight.  I have often cited the “greatest generation” in this regard.…
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , , ,




The Enterprising Investor’s Guide 7-6-2010

The Enterprising Investor’s Guide 7-6-2010

Courtesy of Ockham Research 

The price-to-peak earnings multiple dipped to just 11.5x–its lowest point since last October.  Equity markets sold off strongly in the face of renewed concerns about foundering US economic growth and the anemic performance of the labor market.  Government statistics revealed that non-farm payrolls actually declined in June for the first time this year, which is quite uncommon for economies in the early stages of a recovery.  After all is said and done, equities gave back 12% in the second quarter, reversing the trend of four straight quarters of market gains.

The stock market appears to be at an inflection point—one which likely will set the tone for the second half of the year.  If current analysts’ earnings estimates turnout to be anywhere close to accurate, then stock valuations appear to be increasingly attractive.  Valuations are particularly enticing for the largest US stocks, many of which are trading at only about 10x one-year forward earnings estimates (XOM, IBM and T for example).  However, many of these estimates have been based on previous assumptions of US growth that could be a bit aggressive.  Should we see companies fail to meet the raised earnings bar or analysts’ estimates trending lower, then we would expect another down-leg for equities.

image

The percentage of NYSE stocks trading above their 30-week moving average dropped below 35% following last week’s more than 5% decline in the S&P 500.  A burgeoning number of pundits are now predicting a “double-dip” recession in some form or another. Meredith Whitney claims that a double-dip in housing is already underway and the persistent weakness in private sector job growth has turned many bulls to bears. Also, global concerns regarding the ongoing sovereign debt crisis in Europe and a suspected bubble forming in Chinese real estate have global stock investors on edge.  With all the fear, uncertainty and doubt looming around the financial markets, it seems to us that investors will need reminders that things are in fact getting better with each passing day.  Third quarter earnings season begins next week, but we believe that stocks will be in a “show me” state of mind, and we don’t mean Missouri!…
continue reading


Tags: , , , , ,




Housing Headwinds and Baby Boom Demographics

Housing Headwinds and Baby Boom Demographics

Courtesy of Charles Hugh Smith, Of Two Minds 

Bubble valuations and Baby Boom demographics both suggest housing prices have a long way to fall. 

Combine home prices that are still at bubble heights with the demographics of aging baby Boomers dumping McMansions and you get massively rising supply overwhelming declining demand.

A recent story in the S.F. Chronicle Real Estate section neatly illustrates the trajectory of tens of millions of Baby Boomer home buyers and owners: Home Appreciation: Concord home steady, secure during ‘roller coaster’

The couple bought their first home in a modest suburb in the late 1970s for an undisclosed price, then bought a home in another suburb in 1980 for $96,000. In 1987 they sold that residence for $110,000 and bought another one for $135,000. They then sold that house for $400,000 in 2002 and bought their current home for a price "in the $600,000s" (realtor-speak for about $650,000). After peaking in value at the bubble top in 2005-06 at around $1,000,000, the home is now on the market for $637,000 ($600,000 + 6% commission).

To peek under the hood of the larger trends, I’ve laid out each buy/sell along with its inflation adjusted value in current dollars. As always, I use the BLS inflation calculator; though it reflects the flaws of the CPI calculation methodology, it is consistent.

1980 purchase: $96,000
in 2010 dollars: $252,000

1987 sale: $110,000
in 2010 dollars: $210,000

1987 purchase: $135,000
in 2010 dollars: $257,000

2002 sale: $400,000
in 2010 dollars: $482,000

2002 purchase: $650,000
in 2010 dollars: $783,000

2010 sale: (projected) $637,000

These inflation-adjusted "real" numbers are insightfully different from the nominal prices.

To place the 1980 valuations in proper context, we need to recall that the U.S. was suffering from sky-high inflation in the late 70s and extremely high rates of new household formation as the 78 millon Baby Boomers went out and bought houses. Those two factors created a housing boom, both in valuations and homes built.

It took $1.36 in 1980 to buy what $1 had bought a mere three years before in 1977. As people fled the stock market for tangible assets and Boomers started families, real estate soared (as did gold). While I don’t have the numbers for that house bought for $96,000 in 1980, anecdotally I can assure you that homes…
continue reading


Tags: , , , , ,




Analyzing Corporate Margins As S&P500 Free Cash Flows Hits Record

Pragcap examined the same phenomenon this morning from a different perspective, that of earnings season surprises. – Ilene 

Analyzing Corporate Margins As S&P500 Free Cash Flows Hits Record 

Courtesy of Tyler Durden at Zero Hedge 

In the recent multiple expansion run up, one of the largely ignored factors has been the dramatic rise in corporate margins, be they Gross Profit, EBITDA, Net Income or unlevered Free Cash Flow. Of course, all this has been a function of massive cuts in corporate overhead as most companies have laid off the bulk of their workers, resulting in a seemingly stronger bottom line. In the meantime, assorted stimulus programs by the government have prevented revenues from crashing, thus boosting EPS, on both a historical and a projected basis.

We demonstrate the dramatic surge in margins by scouring through the S&P 500 companies over the past 3 years, and question just how sustainable this margin pick up is. As more and more analysts predict that future margin expansion is sure to drive the market higher, we can’t help but wonder 1) with stimulus benefits expiring and excess liquidity approaching an inflection point (especially in China) who will keep the top line strong, 2) as companies are forced, as a result, to hire more workers in order to drive sales, how will operating margins maintain their stellar performance, and 3) how will a decline in margins be justified from a multiple expansion standpoint. Lastly, we parse through the thoughts of William Hester of Hussman funds, who has some very critical observations on this very relevant topic.

As the chart below demonstrates, virtually every margin metric is now trading at or above its 3 year average.

One notable observation is the unlevered Free Cash Flow margin, which at 12.6% is now at a recent record. We have preciously discussed how companies have extracted major cash concession by squeezing net working capital, which is likely a factor in the disproportionate rise in FCF margins relative to all other metrics. The immediate result of this cash conservation has been of course the dramatic increase in corporate cash balances, which some have speculated is merely in anticipation of much higher corporate tax rates down the line, as well as general austerity as the reality of America’s insolvency trickes down to individual corporations.

The take home here is that margins have likely little room left to grow. This is especially true…
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,




‘Overvalued, Check. Overbought, Check. Overbullish, Check….’

‘Overvalued, Check. Overbought, Check. Overbullish, Check….’

Courtesy of Michael Panzner at Financial Armageddon, and John Hussman

German Stock Exchange Opens After Wall Street Crash

I’ve written a fair number of posts highlighting the disconnect between Wall Street and Main Street (far more than I can remember, in fact). But even if you ignore what is happening in the real economy (you know, like Wall Street usually does), share prices are out of whack — with their own history. In "Clarity and Valuation," John P. Hussman, President of Hussman Investment Trust, discusses that very issue in this week’s edition of Hussman Funds’ Weekly Market Comment:

Last week, the dividend yield on the S&P 500 dropped below 2%, versus a historical average closer to double that level. While part of the reason for the paucity of yield in the current market can be explained by the 20% plunge in dividend payouts over the past year, as financial companies have cut or halted dividends to conserve cash, the fact is that current payouts are not at all out of line with their historical relationship to revenues, and even a full recovery of the past year’s dividend cuts would still leave the yield at a paltry 2.5%. The October 1987 crash occurred from a yield of 2.65%, which was, at the time, the lowest yield observed in history, matched only by the 1972 peak prior to the brutal 1973-74 bear market.

Those two periods had a few other things in common. In the weeks immediately preceding the market downturn, stocks were overbought, had advanced significantly over prior weeks, bond yields were creeping higher, and investment advisory bearishness had dropped below 19%. All of those features should be familiar, because we observed them at the 1987 and 1972 peaks, and we observe them now.

On the basis of normalized profit margins, the average price/earnings ratio for the S&P 500, prior to 1995, was only about 13. Higher historical “norms” reflect the addition into that average of extremely high “recession P/Es,” based on dividing the S&P 500 by extremely low, but temporarily depressed earnings. For example, the P/E for the S&P 500 currently is 86, because earnings have been devastated, but it would be foolish to take that figure at face value, and equally foolish to work it into a historical “average” P/E. The pre-1995 norm


continue reading


Tags: , , , , ,




LET’S GET TECHNICAL – STOCKS STILL SUSCEPTIBLE TO DECLINE

LET’S GET TECHNICAL – STOCKS STILL SUSCEPTIBLE TO DECLINE

Courtesy of The Pragmatic Capitalist

The technical perspective from Decision Point:

Stocks have been in the overvalued end of the normal P/E range since the early-1990s, and this condition shows no sign of abating. Below is an excerpt from our daily earnings summary that will offer readers a better perspective. I have outlined the 2009 Q4 results because that is the first quarter not distorted by the huge loss reported in 2008 Q4. While the results of the current quarter are not final, 90% of companies have reported, and I don’t think there will be any surprises from the remaining companies sufficient to change the estimated results a substantial amount. As you can see, valuations are projected to be well above the overvalued limit of the range (P/E of 20) through the first two quarters of 2010. If the market continues to rally, the over valuation will persist into the foreseeable future.

DP1

Since price movement over the last two decades seems to have little relationship to P/E ratios, why pay any attention to values? In fact, Decision Point’s trend-following models consider price movement and nothing else. Nevertheless, we still want to be aware of the condition of the fundamental foundation of the market, and we believe that investor ignorance in this regard will only lead to more pain. After all, investors have been ignoring valuations for nearly two decades, and the result has been a stock bubble and two major bear markets. Most have not fared well during this period.

At each price top for the last two months I have been expecting a correction to begin, yet price declines have been relatively small and each top is followed by a higher top. Frustrating! I am not trying to identify a shorting opportunity, because shorting is not recommended during a bull market. The only reason that a decent correction is important is that it will provide a lower-risk opportunity to open new long positions.

For two weeks the market has been rolling over into what could be another short-term top. Or it could be the beginning of the long-awaited correction. Negative divergences still abound, but, as I told a subscriber, these conditions are usually not too serious in a bull market. The market is vulnerable, but it is not a time…
continue reading


Tags: , , ,




Equities Aren’t a Bargain

Equities Aren’t a Bargain

Courtesy of Michael Panzner of Financial Armageddon

Even if you don’t buy my argument that there is plenty more downside to come as far as the U.S. economy is concerned, that doesn’t necessarily mean you should acquire or own stocks.

Aside from the fact that revenues aren’t keeping pace with profits and the latter are in many cases being pumped up by quick fixes that undermine future prospects — as I noted yesterday in ""Wall Street’s Gains Equal Main Street’s Loss?" — the reality is that equities simply aren’t a bargain.

Indeed, the Pragmatic Capitalist says as much in a graph-filled post entitled "Is the Market Cheap":

I’ve compiled a few different measures of valuation for your consideration.   Regular readers know that I am not much a “value” investor.  Value, in my opinion is in the eye of the beholder.  Is Apple cheaper at a high PE than GE at a low valuation?   Perhaps yes, perhaps no.  Most valuation metrics are based on the guesses of the analyst community – something that I believe is entirely unreliable.  Nonetheless, here are a few measures to help you put things in perspective:

val1 - US Tobin's Q

val2 - us market cap-to-GDP

val3 - us p/e on trend earnings

 

 


Tags: , ,




CHART OF THE DAY: REVISITING THE MARCH LOWS?

If history repeats, keep this chart in mind.

CHART OF THE DAY: REVISITING THE MARCH LOWS?

Courtesy of The Pragmatic Capitalist

According to Bloomberg and Jim Reid, we’re likely to see much lower valuations (and stock prices) at some point in the next few years:

June 22 (Bloomberg) — U.S. and European stocks are destined to fall below March’s lows if bear-market history is any guide, according to Jim Reid, a strategist at Deutsche Bank AG.

Share prices tend to hit bottom “at extremely cheap levels” relative to earnings during so-called secular bear markets, Reid wrote five days ago in his first equity strategy report. Secular bears consist of multiple rallies and declines, with each slump producing lower valuations than the prior one.

The CHART OF THE DAY shows the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index’s price-earnings ratio since 1900, based on data compiled by Yale University’s Robert Shiller and cited in Reid’s report.

stocks666

Shiller calculated the P/E ratio at 6.6 in September 1982, just before the 1980s bull market started. The gauge sank to less than six in the depths of the Great Depression and at the beginning of the 1920s. This year, it has stayed above 13.

“History tells us that at some point in the next decade there will be much more stressed valuations than today and a once-in-a-generation buying opportunity,” wrote Reid, who previously focused on credit-market strategy.

Even “a large rally” later this year and into 2010 may not be enough to prevent this scenario from unfolding, he added. The S&P 500 has climbed as much as 40 percent from its March 9 lows. Reid’s European benchmark, a local-currency version of the MSCI Europe Index, has risen as much as 33 percent.


Tags: , ,




 
 
 

Zero Hedge

Debunking The Myths About An Attack On North Korea

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by The Saker,

First, the bragging dummies

Trump and Haley are still at it.  They want to force China to take action against the DPRK by threatening to take North Korea “into their hands” if China refuses to comply.  Haley said, “But to be clear, China can do more, (…) and we’re putting as much pressure on them as we can...



more from Tyler

Phil's Favorites

Stunning Visualization Of The Explosion Of ICO Activity In The Last Four Years

Courtesy of Zero Hedge

Via Elementus.io,

This graphic shows every token sale that successfully raised at least $100k, from the beginning of 2014 through the end of last month, November 2017. The bar chart at the bottom displays the total dollar amount raised in each month (details below).

How big is the ICO (aka token sale) market really?

It seems like this should be an easy question to answer. After all, blockchains are open data layers that contain a complete record of every transaction ever made. However, we've found the answer to this question to be surprisingly elu...



more from Ilene

Digital Currencies

Stunning Visualization Of The Explosion Of ICO Activity In The Last Four Years

Courtesy of Zero Hedge

Via Elementus.io,

This graphic shows every token sale that successfully raised at least $100k, from the beginning of 2014 through the end of last month, November 2017. The bar chart at the bottom displays the total dollar amount raised in each month (details below).

How big is the ICO (aka token sale) market really?

It seems like this should be an easy question to answer. After all, blockchains are open data layers that contain a complete record of every transaction ever made. However, we've found the answer to this question to be surprisingly elu...



more from Bitcoin

Chart School

Tape Reading - Dow Jones Price Waves

Courtesy of Read the Ticker.

This is a continuation of price wave analysis.

More from RTT Tv

RTT Volume wave analysis like this helps the retail investor find price action that is true. The reference to 'tape reading' is by the definition of Richard Wyckoff (section 5M of the Wyckoff Course), you can learn more about RTT Volume Wave here.





NOTE: readtheticker.com does allow users to load objects and text on charts, however some annotations are by a free third party image tool named Paint.net ...

more from Chart School

Insider Scoop

Attention Contrarians: This Analyst Says JD.com Set Up Could Be In Your Favor

Courtesy of Benzinga.

Related JD Want Some Exposure To China's Growth? Stifel Says Buy JD Or Alibaba Q3 13F Roundup: How Buffett...

http://www.insidercow.com/ more from Insider

Biotech

Designer proteins that package genetic material could help deliver gene therapy

Reminder: Pharmboy and Ilene are available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

Designer proteins that package genetic material could help deliver gene therapy

Courtesy of Ian HaydonUniversity of Washington

Delivering genetic material is a key challenge in gene therapy. Invitation image created by Kstudio, CC BY

If you’ve ever bought a new iPhone, you’ve experienced good packaging.

The way the lid slowly separates from the box. The pull...



more from Biotech

ValueWalk

Tax Bill May Spark Exodus From High-Tax States

Courtesy of FinancialSense.com via ValueWalk.com

The following is a summary of our recent podcast, “Exodus – The Major Wealth Migration,” which can be listened to on our site here on on iTunes here.

It’s looking increasingl...



more from ValueWalk

Members' Corner

An Interview with David Brin

Our guest David Brin is an astrophysicist, technology consultant, and best-selling author who speaks, writes, and advises on a range of topics including national defense, creativity, and space exploration. He is also a well-known and influential futurist (one of four “World's Best Futurists,” according to The Urban Developer), and it is his ideas on the future, specifically the future of civilization, that I hope to learn about here.   

Ilene: David, you base many of your predictions of the future on a theory of historica...



more from Our Members

Mapping The Market

Puts things in perspective

Courtesy of Jean-Luc

Puts things in perspective:

The circles don't look to be to scale much!

...

more from M.T.M.

OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of September 11th, 2017

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



more from OpTrader

Promotions

NewsWare: Watch Today's Webinar!

 

We have a great guest at today's webinar!

Bill Olsen from NewsWare will be giving us a fun and lively demonstration of the advantages that real-time news provides. NewsWare is a market intelligence tool for news. In today's data driven markets, it is truly beneficial to have a tool that delivers access to the professional sources where you can obtain the facts in real time.

Join our webinar, free, it's open to all. 

Just click here at 1 pm est and join in!

[For more information on NewsWare, click here. For a list of prices: NewsWar...



more from Promotions

Kimble Charting Solutions

Brazil; Waterfall in prices starting? Impact U.S.?

Courtesy of Chris Kimble.

Below looks at the Brazil ETF (EWZ) over the last decade. The rally over the past year has it facing a critical level, from a Power of the Pattern perspective.

CLICK ON CHART TO ENLARGE

EWZ is facing dual resistance at (1), while in a 9-year down trend of lower highs and lower lows. The counter trend rally over the past 17-months has it testing key falling resistance. Did the counter trend reflation rally just end at dual resistance???

If EWZ b...



more from Kimble C.S.

All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: Harlan is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

more from David



FeedTheBull - Top Stock market and Finance Sites



About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

Learn more About Phil >>


As Seen On:




About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

Market Shadows >>