Archive for 2012

For Stocks, Plenty of Cash But The Will To Commit It Has Been Lacking

Lee Adler of the Wall Street Examiner noted in "Fed Creates Nightmare Scenario, Closes Eyes, Sings Trololo" that on Dec. 12, the Federal Reserve elected to print an additional $45 billion a month via outright purchases of Treasuries.

That’s in addition to the printing of $40 billion a month via Mortgage Backed Securities (MBS) purchases that it is already doing. It will also continue to reinvest the proceeds of maturing MBS. That’s been running at $35-$40 billion per month. At that rate the Fed will be pumping at least $120 billion per month into the trading accounts of the Primary Dealers. This total is as high as during QE 1 in 2009. The dealers will use the cash to purchase more Treasuries, which will partly fund the Treasury debt. Other buyers will continue to fund the rest.

Primary dealers are investment banks which serve as trading counterparties of the New York Fed in its implementation of monetary policy. For example: Goldman Sachs, HSBC Securities, J.P. Morgan and Morgan Stanley (list here). In addition to purchasing more Treasuries with cash from the Fed, the Primary Dealers will purchase MBS and buy stocks and commodities. 

Lee surmised that the Fed created a "Catch 22" for itself by tying the Fed Funds rate to "expected" inflation, as it decided to keep the target range for the federal funds rate at 0 to 1/4 percent for as long as the unemployment rate remains above 6-1/2 percent with inflation no more than a half percentage point above its 2 percent longer term goal. The Fed is not anticipating inflation to exceed 2%, as it measures it. However, many have argued that the Fed's measures are flawed and/or manipulated.  Lee:

The Fed governors and bank presidents didn’t see inflation surpassing 2%, EVER.

But what if, as I think highly likely, commodity prices surge as a result of this new round of money printing. Normally, in the short run, commodity price rises do not filter into the inflation measures which the Fed watches. Commodity price inflation could rage without pushing the PCE and core PCE to anywhere near the 2.5% threshold the Fed has set.

That has the potential to wreak havoc in the economy without raising employment levels at all. Manufacturers, middlemen and consumers would be squeezed by rising food and energy costs well before the Fed had any inkling of an increase in the tortoise-like PCE measures.


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Guest Post: Gun Control? No, Drone Control.

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by John Aziz of Azizonomics blog,

The terrible massacre committed by a mentally-disturbed man in Newtown, Connecticut last Friday has prompted lots and lots of calls for gun control in the United States, as well as some calls for more help for the mentally ill.

There are some problems with both suggestions. First of all, the evidence shows that certain “treatments” for the mentally ill — specifically, SSRI antidepressants — are associated with shooting sprees.2006 study in the UK showed that antidepressants can cause severe violence in a small number of individuals. It is possible that increasing the screening and “treatment” for mental illness may result in more incidences of severe violence. (On the other hand some therapies like psychotherapy, music therapy, and art therapy might help certain individuals, but these are almost certainly less profitable for big pharma…)

But what about gun control? There is little doubt that in the coming years the gun-show loophole will be closed and Canadian-style longer waiting periods will be introduced. Semi-automatic weapons may well be banned. Buyback programs may be attempted. The Supreme Court might well even be stacked to achieve a majority that interprets away individual gun rights.

But America already has huge quantities of guns, far more than anywhere in the world:

total-gun-ownership

 

The vast majority of America’s 285 million guns are in Republican states, which are unlikely to be disarmed easily, even with an overwhelming Federal consensus. Some might even try to secede from the Union.

And as the experience of many other countries including Britain and Australia shows, criminals and those with violent intent will still be able to get guns (the only people who will be disarmed are the law-abiding majority).

This trend is only likely to grow in coming years as technologies such as 3D printing make it possible for anyone with a 3D printer and an internet connection to potentially print a gun (and eventually, bullets):

Imagine an America in which anyone can download and print a gun in their own home. They wouldn’t need a license, a background check, or much technical knowledge, just a 3D printer. That’s the vision a cadre of industrious


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Samuelson: “Frank Knight Thought Keynes Was The Devil” And Other Insights

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Originally posted by John Cassidy at The New Yorker,

In the fall of 1996, I arranged to interview Paul Samuelson in his office at M.I.T. for an article I was writing on the state of economics, which is available online to subscribers. At the allotted time, 12:00 if I remember rightly, there was no sign of Samuelson, who was then eighty-one. A few minutes went by. Then he bounced in on the soles of his feet, a diminutive man dressed in a light gray suit, a red-and-white-striped shirt, and a snazzy bow tie. He had gray, frizzy hair, shaggy eyebrows, and a wicked smile. His usual parking space had been occupied, he shouted to his secretary, so he had been forced to park in somebody else’s. “I hope it’s Franco’s. He’s out of town.” (Franco was Franco Modigliani, a fellow M.I.T. Nobel Laureate, who died in 2003.)

Befitting a scholar of his stature, Samuelson had a big airy office that overlooked the Charles River. Books and journals lined the walls and floors, but Samuelson’s desk was neat. On the blackboard, there was a note of congratulations from his colleagues for winning the “National Medal of Science,” which he had received at the White House earlier that year. Samuelson joined M.I.T.’s faculty in 1940. He wrote more than four hundred journal articles, numerous monographs and a famous undergraduate textbook, which, he proudly informed me, had sold “three million or four million copies—I can’t remember which.” When he was awarded the Nobel Prize, in 1970, the citation read: “By his contributions, Samuelson has done more than any other contemporary economist to raise the level of scientific analysis in economic theory.” Almost forty years later, few would quibble with that description.

I began by asking Samuelson whether he was still a Keynesian. Early in his career, he helped to formulate the income-expenditure framework that John Maynard Keynes put forward in his 1936 book, “The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money,” capturing its essential elements in a simple diagram that is still used in elementary economics classes.

“I call myself a post-Keynesian,” Samuelson replied. “The 1936 Model A Keynesianism is passé. Of course, it doesn’t meant that it wasn’t right for its time.” He recalled attending an event that was held in Cambridge, England,


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Citi’s Apple Coverage Tag Trio Downgrades AAPL To Neutral, Price Target Cut By $100 To $575

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

It seems like it was only yesterday (actually it was 20 days ago) that Citi boldly went where every single other sellside analyst has gone before, and initiated the world’s biggest hedge fund hotel stock, AAPL, with a Buy and a $675 price target, only it stunned the world by assigning not one, not two, but three analysts to follow the name (and to generate gobs of soft dollars from Hedge Funds but that’s a different story entirely): a chip analyst, a hardware, and a software expert. Well, much has changed in three weeks apparently, because that tag trio just slashed AAPL’s price target from $675 to $575, and cut its outlook on the name from Buy to Neutral, once again confirming what everyone knows: sellside research is the most hopelessly useless goalseeking, backward looking product created by Wall Street’s brilliant minds whose only prerogative is how to bleed their clients dry.

Full report for those who are running low on one-ply Charmin’ or its monetary equivalent, US Dollars (both soon to be urgently needed by a diarrhea-impaired Shinzo Abe).





The Main Stumbling Block Of The Abe Administration: Diarrhea?

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

As we pointed out earlier today, Japan’s new Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, is really Japan’s old Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who in September 2007 quit after precisly one year in the PM post, despite having been groomed his entire life just for the position. His tenure was, in short, a sheer disaster. The Economist summarizes it as follows: “Mr Abe’s government was initially very popular. Yet the tide in Mr Abe’s affairs only ebbed. True, early on he made a notable opening towards China, with whom relations had been strained under Mr Koizumi. Other than that, Mr Abe proved unable to impose discipline upon a cabinet of the corrupt and incompetent. Worse, he had a tin ear for the political mood. Voters, it had turned out, had been beguiled more by Mr Koizumi the messenger than by his message of structural reform, which entailed pain and uncertainty, notably in Japan’s rural regions and among the old. Mr Abe failed to address these concerns.”

“Domestic policy interests him not a jot… Mr Abe’s inert response to a bureaucratic scandal involving 50m missing pensions records underscored how out-of-touch he was. In late July voters punished his government in elections for the Diet’s upper house: for the first time in its half-century life, the LDP and allies lost the upper-house majority, to the opposition Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ). Not just the opposition but LDP heavyweights too began calling for Mr Abe’s resignation.”

And thus began the slide of the LDP, which soon thereafter saw its uninterrupted run of 50 years at the helm of Japan end, with power handed over to the DPJ. Yet what was the gracious “exit” pretext that Abe used to evacuate his leadership spot without admitting defeat? Diarrhea. Yup: diarrhea.

The aptly named Japan Probe explains:

Shinzo Abe resigned as Prime Minister, claiming that diarrhea was preventing him from carrying out his duties. The diarrhea was due to ulcerative colitis, a bowel illness caused by ulcers. Abe had suffered from this illness for decades, but after becoming Prime Minister, the stress of his job apparently made the symptoms worse.

Surely, the complete collapse of public support for his government had nothing to…
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Why We’re Ungovernable, Part 5: Japan “Would Be Manageable, If Only…”

Courtesy of John Rubino.

Japan’s government has fallen — again:

Two-Party Japan Democracy Undone in 39 Months as DPJ Crumbles
It took 54 years for Japan’s politics to produce a viable opposition party, and 39 months for it to self-destruct after winning power, splintering prospects for an enduring policy-driven two-party system.

The Democratic Party of Japan lost as many as three-fourths of its seats in Parliament’s lower house three years after sweeping the Liberal Democratic Party from a half-century of almost unbroken rule. An LDP-led coalition was on track to win a two-thirds majority in the 480-seat chamber, broadcaster NHK said late yesterday.

While the DPJ’s leaders came under fire for the response to the March 2011 earthquake and nuclear disaster, the biggest collapse in public support preceded the crisis. Undermined by a faction boss who later split and took about 50 seats with him, the DPJ flubbed its historic chance at the beginning by pledging to move a U.S. military base off Okinawa, then reneging on it.

“It was a missed opportunity for now to build a true two- party system,” said Ellis Krauss, a professor of Japanese politics at the University of California, San Diego. “Japan’s major challenges, including an aging society and a huge debt problem, would be manageable if only the political system weren’t so dysfunctional. I’m fairly pessimistic the political leadership will confront the problems any time soon.”

The DPJ was projected to lose at least 150 of its 230 seats in the lower house, which would be the worst showing of any governing party since the end of World War II. The Japan Restoration Party, led by ex-Tokyo Governor Shintaro Ishihara and Osaka Mayor Toru Hashimoto, was on track to win almost as seats as the DPJ making it the third, NHK projections showed.

‘Couldn’t Deliver’

“They talked big but they couldn’t deliver,” said Masatsugu Kitano, a 77-year-old company executive in Tokyo, speaking days before yesterday’s election, referring to the DPJ. “My trust in political parties is basically zero.”

Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda, the DPJ’s third premier in as many years, said he would quit as party leader. LDP leader Shinzo Abe, in line to reclaim the office he left in 2007, said voters “will be looking carefully at the LDP to see if we fulfill their expectations.”

After governing for all but 10 months since 1955, the LDP was


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17 Macro Surprises For 2013

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Just as Byron Wien publishes his ten surprises for the upcoming year, Morgan Stanley has created a heady list of seventeen macro surprises across all countries they cover that depict plausible possible outcomes that would represent a meaningful surprise to the prevailing consensus. From the return of inflation to ‘Brixit’ and from the BoJ buying Euro-are bonds to a US housing recovery stall out – these seventeen succinctly written paragraphs provide much food for thought as we enter 2013.

 

Via Morgan Stanley:

Just When You Thought it Was Dead, Inflation Returns (Joachim Fels/Charles Goodhart)
A strong economic rebound in China and the US, adverse supply shocks in agriculture and worries about swelling central bank balance sheets lead to a sharp rise in actual and expected global inflation. Central banks don’t dare to respond, given high debt levels and financial fragilities, and either continue to ignore or abandon their inflation targets. Rising wheat prices lead to bread riots. In the UK, Chancellor Osborne advises the British to eat oatcakes instead.

Debt Cancellation (Spyros Andreopoulos)
The US Treasury, Japan’s Ministry of Finance and Her Majesty’s Treasury jointly announce that the Treasury debt held by the Federal Reserve, Bank of Japan and Bank of England respectively as a consequence of QE purchases are cancelled, and that these central banks will operate with negative equity until further notice. As a consequence, government debt/GDP ratios are brought down by 11pp, 18pp and 25pp, respectively. Ratings agencies love it, as does the bond market – until it realizes that large-scale debt monetization has just taken place, and sells off sharply.

US Over the Cliff and Likes it (Vincent Reinhart)
The US goes over the fiscal cliff and likes it. A deal delayed to early 2013 in which politicians compromise because of concerns about financial markets would resolve uncertainty more assuredly than the baseline of stop-gap legislation followed by a plan later in the year. As a consequence, confidence gets a boost, pent-up business investment kicks in and the labour market improves more rapidly.

US Housing Stalls Out (David Greenlaw)
The burgeoning housing recovery in the US begins to stall due to credit tightening. There is still no private mortgage market at this point and financial problems are brewing at the FHA which could lead to a dramatic reduction in credit availability for first-time homebuyers.…
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Spotlight on Japan: Return of ‘Abenomics’, More Militarism, Tougher China Line; Outlook for Yen and Nikkei

Courtesy of Mish.

The Japanese election hands former prime minister Shinzo Abe a chance for redemption according to The Guardian.

Japan’s voters appear to have short memories. Shinzo Abe, who is assured of becoming prime minister after his party’s resounding victory in Sunday’s election, last led the country in 2006, but stepped down after a troubled year in office.

The official reason given for his abrupt resignation was a chronic bowel ailment, which the leader, 58, says he now controls with a new drug. But his health condition may have been a cover. Abe’s first administration was marred by scandals and gaffes. Months before he quit, his Liberal Democratic party [LDP] suffered a heavy defeat in upper house elections.

Sunday’s resounding election victory has given him one last shot at redemption, as only the second Japanese politician to serve twice as prime minister since the war.

Behind Abe’s soft-spoken manner and aristocratic background lurks a fervent nationalist, which led one liberal commentator to describe him as “the most dangerous politician in Japan”.

Abe has often said he went into politics to help Japan “escape the postwar regime” and throw off the shackles of wartime guilt. In its place he has talked of creating a “beautiful Japan” defended by a strong military and guided by a new sense of national pride.

Abe’s biggest ideological influence was his maternal grandfather, Nobusuke Kishi, who was arrested, but never charged, for alleged war crimes. He went on to become prime minister in the late 1950s.

Decades later, confronted with an aggressive China and nuclear-armed North Korea, Abe is eager to fulfil his grandfather’s dream of giving Japan’s military the teeth he believes it has been denied by the country’s postwar pacifism.

More Militarism, Preposterous Denial

The BBC reports Shinzo Abe vows tough China line

The BBC’s Rupert Wingfield-Hayes says that as many predicted, Japan has taken a sharp turn to the right.

Mr Noda lost over his move to double sales tax, something he said was necessary to tackle Japan’s massive debt.

By contrast, Mr Abe has promised more public spending, looser monetary policy, and to allow nuclear energy a role to play in resource-poor Japan’s future despite last year’s nuclear disaster at Fukushima.



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Guest Post: The Two Charts You Should See Before Risking A Dime In The Market In 2013

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Via Charles Hugh-Smith of OfTwoMinds blog,

Two charts suggest a major decline is ahead in 2013.

"Don't fight the Fed," blah blah blah. Really? What did the market do after QE3 and QE4 were duly announced? It tanked.
 
What if the Fed is out of tricks? It's not really a question; Fed chairman Ben Bernanke said as much in his press conference. It's not clear if the Ibogaine was wearing off or just kicking in, but the Chairman had an apologetic deer-in-the-headlights look of, "Gee, we're out of tricks and I'm sorry to have to tell you what is painfully obvious to everyone who isn't stoned silly on Delusionol ™."
 

Now that the Fed's magic hat is visibly out of rabbits, there are all sorts of complexities we could hash over such as the effects of bank charge-off rates on GDP or the Theater of the Absurd "fiscal cliff" play-acting, but why waste all that time and energy when a number of charts forecast trouble for the stock market in 2013?
 
The first overlays bank derivatives with positive fair value against the S&P 500 (SPX), lagged 28 months. Is it cricket to lag or advance indicators? Technician Tom McClellanthinks so, as his forward-12-months eurodollar COT/SPX chart has been eerily prescient in forecasting major market moves in 2012.
 
Here is an article on the chart: Stocks And Euro-Dollar Futures Positioning (11/7/12)
Keeping in mind that there is no one indicator or chart that accurately forecasts market moves consistently over time, consider this overlay of bank derivatives and the SPX:
 

Charts courtesy of longtime correspondent B.C.
Hmm. If there is a correlation here, it doesn't look positive for equities in 2013.Those familiar with McClellan's chart know that it forecasts a serious decline in the SPX in early 2013, followed by a countertrend rally that tops in May. The decline after May is the Big One that punishes everyone


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Stock Review: $MAT, $HITK, $EMR

Courtesy of Declan Fallon

Three stocks from three strong performing sectors: Mattel, Hi Tech Pharmacal, and Emerson Electric. Read more about them here.

—--

Follow Me on Twitter


Dr. Declan Fallon is the Senior Market Technician and Community Director for Zignals.com. I offer a range of stock trading strategies for global markets which can be Previewed for Free with delayed trade signals. You can also view the top-10 best trading strategies for the US, UK, Europe and Rest-of-the-World in the Trading Strategy Marketplace Leaderboard. The Leaderboard also supports advanced search capability so you can tailor your strategies to suit your individual requirements.

Zignals offers a full suite of FREE financial services including price and fundamental stock alerts, stock charts for Indian, Australian, Frankfurt, Euronext, UK, Ireland and Canadian stocks, tabbed stock quote watchlists, multi-currency portfolio manager, active stock screener with fundamental trading strategy support and trading system builder. Forex, precious metal and energy commodities too. Build your own strategy and sell it in the MarketPlace to earn real cash.

You can read what others are saying about Zignals on Investimonials.com.
JOIN ZIGNALS TODAY – IT’S FREE!





 
 
 

Zero Hedge

Visualizing How Much Oil Is In An Electric Vehicle?

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

When most people think about oil and natural gas, the first thing that comes to mind is the gas in the tank of their car. But, as Visual Capitalist's Nicholas LePan notes, there is actually much more to oil’s role, than meets the eye...

Oil, along with natural gas, has hundreds of different uses in a modern vehicle through petrochemicals.

Today’s infographic comes to us from American Fuel & Petrochemicals Manufacturers, and covers why oil is a critical mate...



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Phil's Favorites

Assange's new indictment: Espionage and the First Amendment

 

Embed from Getty Images

 

Assange’s new indictment: Espionage and the First Amendment

Courtesy of Ofer Raban, University of Oregon

Julian Assange, the co-founder of WikiLeaks, has been charged by the U.S. Department of Justice with a slew of Espionage Act violations that could keep him in prison for the rest of his life.

The new indictment expands an earlier one charging Assange with conspiring w...



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Insider Scoop

Jefferies Sees 60-Percent Upside In Aphria Shares, Says Buy The Dip

Courtesy of Benzinga.

After a red-hot start to 2019, Canadian cannabis producer Aphria Inc (NYSE: APHA) has run out of steam, tumbling more than 31 percent in the past three months.

Despite the recent weakness, one Wall Street analyst said Friday that the stock has 30-percent upside potential. 

The Analyst

Jefferies analyst ...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

DAX (Germany) About To Send A Bearish Message To The S&P 500?

Courtesy of Chris Kimble.

Is the DAX index from Germany about to send a bearish message to stocks in Europe and the States? Sure could!

This chart looks at the DAX over the past 9-years. It’s spent the majority of the past 8-years inside of rising channel (1), creating a series of higher lows and higher highs.

It looks to have created a “Double Top” as it was kissing the underside of the rising channel last year at (2).

After creating the potential double top, the DAX index has continued to create a series of lower highs, while experiencing a bearish divergence with the S...



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Chart School

Brexit Joke - Cant be serious all the time

Courtesy of Read the Ticker.

Alistair Williams comedian nails it, thank god for good humour! Prime Minister May the negotiator. Not!


Alistair Williams Comedian youtube

This is a classic! ha!







Fundamentals are important, and so is market timing, here at readtheticker.com we believe a combination of Gann Angles, ...

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Digital Currencies

Cryptocurrencies are finally going mainstream - the battle is on to bring them under global control

 

Cryptocurrencies are finally going mainstream – the battle is on to bring them under global control

The high seas are getting lower. dianemeise

Courtesy of Iwa Salami, University of East London

The 21st-century revolutionaries who have dominated cryptocurrencies are having to move over. Mainstream financial institutions are adopting these assets and the blockchain technology that enables them, in what ...



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Biotech

DNA as you've never seen it before, thanks to a new nanotechnology imaging method

Reminder: We are available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

DNA as you've never seen it before, thanks to a new nanotechnology imaging method

A map of DNA with the double helix colored blue, the landmarks in green, and the start points for copying the molecule in red. David Gilbert/Kyle Klein, CC BY-ND

Courtesy of David M. Gilbert, Florida State University

...



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ValueWalk

More Examples Of "Typical Tesla "wise-guy scamminess"

By Jacob Wolinsky. Originally published at ValueWalk.

Stanphyl Capital’s letter to investors for the month of March 2019.

rawpixel / Pixabay

Friends and Fellow Investors:

For March 2019 the fund was up approximately 5.5% net of all fees and expenses. By way of comparison, the S&P 500 was up approximately 1.9% while the Russell 2000 was down approximately 2.1%. Year-to-date 2019 the fund is up approximately 12.8% while the S&P 500 is up approximately 13.6% and the ...



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Members' Corner

Despacito - How to Make Money the Old-Fashioned Way - SLOWLY!

Are you ready to retire?  

For most people, the purpose of investing is to build up enough wealth to allow you to retire.  In general, that's usually enough money to reliably generate a year's worth of your average income, each year into your retirement so that that, plus you Social Security, should be enough to pay your bills without having to draw down on your principle.

Unfortunately, as the last decade has shown us, we can't count on bonds to pay us more than 3% and the average return from the stock market over the past 20 years has been erratic - to say the least - with 4 negative years (2000, 2001, 2002 and 2008) and 14 positives, though mostly in the 10% range on the positives.  A string of losses like we had from 2000-02 could easily wipe out a decades worth of gains.

Still, the stock market has been better over the last 10 (7%) an...



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Mapping The Market

It's Not Capitalism, it's Crony Capitalism

A good start from :

It's Not Capitalism, it's Crony Capitalism

Excerpt:

The threat to America is this: we have abandoned our core philosophy. Our first principle of this nation as a meritocracy, a free-market economy, where competition drives economic decision-making. In its place, we have allowed a malignancy to fester, a virulent pus-filled bastardized form of economics so corrosive in nature, so dangerously pestilent, that it presents an extinction-level threat to America – both the actual nation and the “idea” of America.

This all-encompassing mutant corruption saps men’s souls, crushes opportunities, and destroys economic mobility. Its a Smash & Grab system of ill-gotten re...



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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of September 11th, 2017

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Promotions

Free eBook - "My Top Strategies for 2017"

 

 

Here's a free ebook for you to check out! 

Phil has a chapter in a newly-released eBook that we think you’ll enjoy.

In My Top Strategies for 2017, Phil's chapter is Secret Santa’s Inflation Hedges for 2017.

This chapter isn’t about risk or leverage. Phil present a few smart, practical ideas you can use as a hedge against inflation as well as hedging strategies designed to assist you in staying ahead of the markets.

Some other great content in this free eBook includes:

 

·       How 2017 Will Affect Oil, the US Dollar and the European Union

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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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