Archive for 2013

Swing trading portfolio – week of March 4th, 2013

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here

Optrader 

Swing trading virtual portfolio

 

One trade virtual portfolio

 





What Happens If “Whatever It Takes” Is Not Enough?

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Since promises are as good as gold (or better apparently) for the world’s central bankers, the BoJ’s new man Kuroda dropped those three little words that worked so wonderfully for Draghi back in July. At 1943ET, Kuroda told the world he would do “whatever it takes” to rid his nation of the ravages of deflation. However, unlike the 200 pip rally in EURUSD that Mr. Draghi’s soothing words created (and a risk on rally that last for months); it appears the world’s investors are a little tired of that ol’ chestnut. Since Kuroda opened his mouth and kept promising moar and moar (open-ended buying of longer-dated bonds), the Nikkei has dropped over 100 points and USDJPY has strengthened 60 pips and rising. The question now becomes, what happens if ‘whatever it takes’ is not enough? Meanwhile the JPY strength is wreaking mild havoc with US equity futures which have dropped 6 points from Friday’s close.

 

When Draghi spoke the magic words…

 

When Kuroda tried it…

 

 

Gold and Silver are giving back earlier gains…

 

and US equity futures are sliding (now below Friday’s closing VWAP)…

 

Perhaps this is what Kuroda needs to do… “I would do anything for [inflation]“

… but I won’t do that…

Charts: Bloomberg





Forget Bond Vigilantes, Oakland Residents Now Policing Themselves

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by Michael Krieger of Liberty Blitzkrieg blog,

“Wanted” Signs Emerge in Oakland as Residents Police Themselves

So this is what is happening in Oakland, one of the many forgotten about, left-behind corners of America.  From CBS:

OAKLAND (KPIX 5) – Oakland’s crime problems have gotten so bad that some people aren’t even bothering to call the cops anymore; instead, they’re trying to solve and prevent crimes themselves.

In a neighborhood that has started to feel like the wild west, people have even started posting “wanted” signs.

Personally, I think this is the only “Wanted” sign that people should be putting up all over America.

Bernank Wanted Sign

 

You have to walk around in your house with a gun to feel safe here,” said Alaska Tarvins of the Arcadia Park Board of Directors.

Over the weekend, one home was burglarized twice in a 24 hour period, once while a resident’s nephew was inside.

Now, Arcadia park neighbors are taking the detective work into their own hands.

KPIX 5 found a woman who identified herself as L.E. patrolling her neighborhood by car. She said she recently chased down a couple of robbers herself.

While the macro problems that have led to this are deplorable, there is one silver lining.  The crime crisis is forcing neighbors to get to know each other and come to solutions on their own within their community.  Since we all know by now the bureaucracy will not be coming to the rescue, the sooner we figure out solutions on our own the better.

Welcome to the recovery!

Full article here.





Japan Central Bank Nominee Pledges to Do Whatever Needed to Combat Deflation; Mother of all Pyrrhic Victories

Courtesy of Mish.

Those who thought Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was not serious in his pledge to defeat deflation (and destroy the Yen in the process) need think again.

Haruhiko Kuroda (Abe’s nominee to head Japan’s central bank) pledges to do Whatever Needed to Combat Japan Deflation.

Haruhiko Kuroda, nominated to be the next Bank of Japan governor, said that a central bank under his leadership would do whatever is needed to combat 15 years of deflation.

“I would like to make my stance clear that we will do whatever we can do,” Kuroda, the president of the Asian Development Bank, said in a confirmation hearing in the parliament in Tokyo today.

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s nomination of Kuroda has raised expectations for more aggressive monetary easing to revive the world’s third-biggest economy after Masaaki Shirakawa exits the job on March 19. The opposition Democratic Party of Japan, the largest party in the upper house, has signaled it will back Kuroda, easing his passage through a split parliament.

Kuroda said in an interview this month that falling prices exacerbate real debt burdens, and give an incentive to companies and households to postpone spending. Consumer prices excluding fresh food fell 0.2 percent in January. The price gauge hasn’t advanced 2 percent — the central bank’s new target — for any year since 1997, when a national sales tax was increased.

Mother of all Pyrrhic Victories

Any country determined to wreck its currency can indeed do just that. However, QE alone will not suffice if all the printed money sits as excess reserves. If QE fails, what’s next? More bridges to nowhere?

Regardless, the idea that higher prices are a blessing is blatant stupidity. The last thing aging Japan citizens need is rising prices.

If anything, low interest rates are counterproductive because Japanese savers get zero % on their savings (having less interest income to spend). Sound familiar? It should because Bernanke has the same preposterous ideas.

Once sentiment turns (and it will – but I do not know when), Japan is going to have a hard time preventing the bottom from falling out of the yen. When that happens, the defeat of deflation is going to be the mother of all Pyrrhic victories.

Mike “Mish” Shedlock
http://globaleconomicanalysis.blogspot.com 



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Name That Market? +8.6% Average Annual Return Over 33 Years, Worst Drawdown -4%

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

‘Buy-and-Hold’; Bonds-Schmonds. Sometimes a longer-term perspective is useful for context. Whether you are a safety-seeking, “some-return-is-better-than-no-return” bond-holder; or a “Jim Cramer said ‘all clear’ so I’m nuts deep in stocks” wannabe trader; the charts below at least provide from insight into why all that ‘crazy’ money might prefer the bond market to the stock market. Since rear-view-mirror investing appears the meme of the moment (and hope is now a strategy), it makes one wonder, when fixed income returns average 8.6% per annum for 33 years with a maximum 4% drawdown annually as opposed to stocks with a 8.9% per annum return and four 10%-plus annual drawdowns (and two 50% intra-period collapses within a decade). While we hold no judgment here, arguing that rates are so low they can’t go any further is futile (ask Ben and see Japan) and applies just as well to equity multiples, margin expectations, and fundamentals. Context is king, be informed.

 

Fixed Income… Slow and steady wins the race (for now)

 

Equities… Better Returns but the pain…

 

Fundamentals… not pretty – as a reminder RED is not good…


 

Charts: Bloomberg and Morgan Stanley





Good Italy, Bad Italy, ‘Girlfriend-In-A-Coma’ Italy

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

“Imagine you have a girlfriend; and she is Italy. You love her dearly, but she is in a coma. She has been sick for a long, long time.” Former Economist Editor Bill Emmott’s expansive BBC documentary asks where has Italy gone wrong and examines (deep down inside) the good sides about the country as well as the disasters. With the next few weeks/months dominated by talking heads claiming to be experts on Italy, Italian politics, and Italian society; perhaps spending a few minutes on a Sunday night learning as opposed to guessing which blond will pick which buff young man in a reality show (or who Trump will fire) is time well spent (with a big glass of Chianti obviously).

 





This Time It’s The Same – And That’s Not Good

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

There has been much discussion by the mainstream media of the rise in gas prices since we initially showed the equity market’s dependence (or transitory correlation if you are a Keynesian) on this consumer-crushing unintended consequence of the new normal liquification of our economy. However, while most have focused on the absolute levels (as we noted the $3.75-80 Regular appears to be a limiter in recent years), over time this has not been the case. The stagnation of average hourly earnings combined with the price of gas shows why the last two years have not had the consumer-driven surge of the initial 2009 lurch (or the pre-crisis economy). We are trapped in an era when the average hourly wage buys a de minimus amount of energy and just as we saw heading into 2008, this relative price surge is occurring just as the macro-economic data itself is rolling over. This time it’s the same – a double-dip in macro surprises driven by relative gas prices.

 

 

Charts: Bloomberg





The Science Delusion – Reexamining our Worldview Mindset

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Cognitive Dissonance.

The Science Delusion – Reexamining our Worldview Mindset

By

Cognitive Dissonance

 

If you are anywhere near a window or door why don’t you stop reading right now, get up, walk over and take five or ten seconds to look outside and absorb what you see. Hell, if that’s asking too much of you then just imagine what you would see if you were to look out your window. Go ahead and take a few seconds. I’ll wait.

Regardless of whether your (imagined) view outside was of lawn, woods, mountains, animals or other humans, homes or out buildings, a road or highway, tall office buildings or even skyscrapers, if I were to ask you to describe in detail what you (thought you) saw, what you (thought you) perceived, everyone would pretty much describe it using similar words, phrases, subtext and connotation.

This is because even though we all saw different things, we all employ pretty much the same basis of understanding or belief in how our natural world works and functions, of what ‘it’ is that we think we actually see. In short, we see, perceive and thereby ‘know’ through the (distorting) lens of our worldview and the individual/collective mindset that forms that point of view.

This in turn determines how we perceive, then interpret and finally describe what we see. Contrary to common belief we do not simply ‘see’ what is there. No one sees and perceives everything exactly the same way as anyone else and I’m not just talking about differences in visible color, clarity or contrast nor just through the distortion provided by a political or religious frame of reference.

Our mindset (selectively) interprets what our senses receive based upon our preconceived notions and beliefs. In short, all that we ‘see’ and perceive in every form is run through our worldview mindset for identification, interpretation and then integration. This means that there is great latitude for error when our mindset has
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Did JPM’s CIO Intentionally Start The Margin Call Avalanche That Crushed Lehman?

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

It is conventional wisdom that in the days leading to Lehman’s bankruptcy filing on the night of September 15, 2008, sheer panic and utter confusion ruled ever back- and middle-office, over concerns that a counterparty, any counterparty, but especially Lehman, would end up being “not money good“, and the result was that trigger-happy margin clerks had the potential to make or break a company, by demanding just enough variation margin that would send the notice recipient promptly into bankruptcy. It is also conventional wisdom, that it was precisely several such margin calls mostly out of JPMorgan that precipitated the Chapter 7 filing by Lehman brothers, as the firm was finally unable to mask the fact that it was terminally overlevered, and even more terminally illiquid. It is certainly conventional wisdom, that Lehman was certainly massively overlevered, holding billions of overmarked CMBS on its balance sheet, and was doing everything in its power to hold on to precious liquidity, taking every opportunity to window dress its balance sheet as far better than it truly was (Repo 105 at the end of every quarter promptly comes to mind), over fears of avoiding precisely such a margin call onslaught, where the first margin call would cascade into many, likely lethal, margin calls.

Which is why, over four years after the filing of Lehman’s bankruptcy and the fight for who was responsible for what in the Lehman Chapter 7 saga still waging, most actively between the Lehman creditor estate and tri-party repo stalwart JP Morgan, we were not surprised to learn that the Lehman estate had attempted to force yet another sworn testimony from a (former) employee of JP Morgan, in hopes of catching the firm as engaging in a malicious act of defrauding Lehman of precious liquidity in its final hours, or said in layman’s terms, forcing it to liquidate.

What did catch our attention was that Lehman named the infamous JPM Chief Investment Office, and specifically its very infamous trader Bruno Iksil, accountable along with others for the London Whale fiasco, as the person responsible for an initial margin call to the tune of $273.3 million, made the same day “that JPMorgan made its first of two demands that week each for $5 billion of extra cash collateral that it had no right to…
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Did JPM’s CIO Intentionally And Maliciously Start The Margin Call Avalanche That Crushed Lehman?

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

It is conventional wisdom that in the days leading to Lehman’s bankruptcy filing on the night of September 15, 2008, sheer panic and utter confusion ruled ever back- and middle-office, over concerns that a counterparty, any counterparty, but especially Lehman, would end up being “not money good“, and the result was that trigger-happy margin clerks had the potential to make or break a company, by demanding just enough variation margin that would send the notice recipient promptly into bankruptcy. It is also conventional wisdom, that it was precisely several such margin calls mostly out of JPMorgan that precipitated the Chapter 7 filing by Lehman brothers, as the firm was finally unable to mask the fact that it was terminally overlevered, and even more terminally illiquid. It is certainly conventional wisdom, that Lehman was certainly massively overlevered, holding billions of overmarked CMBS on its balance sheet, and was doing everything in its power to hold on to precious liquidity, taking every opportunity to window dress its balance sheet as far better than it truly was (Repo 105 at the end of every quarter promptly comes to mind), over fears of avoiding precisely such a margin call onslaught, where the first margin call would cascade into many, likely lethal, margin calls.

Which is why, over four years after the filing of Lehman’s bankruptcy and the fight for who was responsible for what in the Lehman Chapter 7 saga still waging, most actively between the Lehman creditor estate and tri-party repo stalwart JP Morgan, we were not surprised to learn that the Lehman estate had attempted to force yet another sworn testimony from a (former) employee of JP Morgan, in hopes of catching the firm as engaging in a malicious act of defrauding Lehman of precious liquidity in its final hours, or said in layman’s terms, forcing it to liquidate.

What did catch our attention was that Lehman named the infamous JPM Chief Investment Office, and specifically its very infamous trader Bruno Iksil, accountable along with others for the London Whale fiasco, as the person responsible for an initial margin call to the tune of $273.3 million, made the same day “that JPMorgan made its first of two demands that week each for $5 billion of extra cash collateral that it had no right to…
continue reading





 
 
 

Phil's Favorites

A massive power outage like Argentina's could happen in the US - 4 essential reads

 

A massive power outage like Argentina's could happen in the US – 4 essential reads

A man reads the newspaper by flashlight during the Northeast Blackout in August 2003. AP Photo/Joe Kohen

Courtesy of Jeff Inglis, The Conversation

Argentina and Uruguay are recovering from nationwide power blackouts that cut electricity to tens of millions of people, including some in ...



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Zero Hedge

Fed Hints At July Cut As Expected, Drops "Patient" Language, Says "Outlook Uncertainty" Has Increased

Courtesy of ZeroHedge

With stocks 1% away from record highs and bond yields (and the curve) tumbling as market expectations for multiple rate-cuts surge, Fed Chair Powell is going to have to thread a very fine needle today - shifting Fed indications towards the market's view without panicking markets over "what he knows that we don't." And of course, Trump will be watching closely...

Offering Powell some room for maneuver is the fact that June rate-cut expectations are around 23%, but July expectations are over 80%, so the dots better adjust soon.

...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

Interest Rates Bottoming On Fed Decision Day?

Courtesy of Chris Kimble.

This afternoon the Fed will announce if they are going to lower interest rates. Does the bond market already have a rate decrease priced into the market? Possible!

This chart looks at the yield on the 10-year note over the past 20-years. Without a doubt, the long-term trend of lower highs remains in play.

Rates have declined over 35% since hitting 20-year falling resistance, that came into play in October of 2018.

The decline has rates testing rising channel support and the 2017 lows this week at (1). While dual support is being tested, weekly momentum is hitting the lowest ...



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Insider Scoop

Benzinga's Top Upgrades, Downgrades For June 19, 2019

Courtesy of Benzinga.

Top Upgrades
  • SunTrust Robinson Humphrey upgraded Tripadvisor Inc (NASDAQ: TRIP) from Hold to Buy. TripAdvisor shares rose 3.2% to $47.80 in pre-market trading.
  • Wedbush upgraded Six Flags Entertainment Corp (NYSE: SIX) from Neutral to Outperform. Six Flags shares rose 2.5% to $52.90 in pre-market trading.
  • Analysts at Goldman Sachs upgraded Lamb Weston Holdings Inc (NYSE: LW) from Neutral to Buy. Lamb Weston rose 3.5% to $61.03 in pre-market trading.
  • ...


http://www.insidercow.com/ more from Insider

Biotech

Consumer genetic testing customers stretch their DNA data further with third-party interpretation websites

Reminder: Pharmboy is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

Consumer genetic testing customers stretch their DNA data further with third-party interpretation websites

If you’ve got the raw data, why not mine it for more info? Sergey Nivens/Shutterstock.com

Courtesy of Sarah Catherine Nelson, University of Washington

Back in 2016, Helen (a pseudonym) took three different direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic tests: AncestryDNA, 23andMe and FamilyTreeDNA. She saw genetic testing as a way...



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Chart School

Silver Review

Courtesy of Read the Ticker.

The folks in the federal reserve will debase the US dollar currency to an extreme degree silver will finally lift off the floor.. 

Note: Readers should re watch the silver back screen news video, here.

The following video looks at price action and Wyckoff logic.

More from RTT Tv






Chart in video

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If gold moves, silver wi...

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Digital Currencies

Cryptos Are Crashing As Asia Opens, Bitcoin Back Below $8k

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Having survived the day's bloodbath in US tech stocks, cryptos are crashing in the early Asian session, apparently playing catch-down to the day's de-risking.

While no catalyst is immediately evident, there are some reports noting 13 large global banks are preparing to launch digital versions of major global currencies next year, though we suspect this drop was more algorithmic that fundamental-driven.

...



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ValueWalk

More Examples Of "Typical Tesla "wise-guy scamminess"

By Jacob Wolinsky. Originally published at ValueWalk.

Stanphyl Capital’s letter to investors for the month of March 2019.

rawpixel / Pixabay

Friends and Fellow Investors:

For March 2019 the fund was up approximately 5.5% net of all fees and expenses. By way of comparison, the S&P 500 was up approximately 1.9% while the Russell 2000 was down approximately 2.1%. Year-to-date 2019 the fund is up approximately 12.8% while the S&P 500 is up approximately 13.6% and the ...



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Members' Corner

Despacito - How to Make Money the Old-Fashioned Way - SLOWLY!

Are you ready to retire?  

For most people, the purpose of investing is to build up enough wealth to allow you to retire.  In general, that's usually enough money to reliably generate a year's worth of your average income, each year into your retirement so that that, plus you Social Security, should be enough to pay your bills without having to draw down on your principle.

Unfortunately, as the last decade has shown us, we can't count on bonds to pay us more than 3% and the average return from the stock market over the past 20 years has been erratic - to say the least - with 4 negative years (2000, 2001, 2002 and 2008) and 14 positives, though mostly in the 10% range on the positives.  A string of losses like we had from 2000-02 could easily wipe out a decades worth of gains.

Still, the stock market has been better over the last 10 (7%) an...



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Mapping The Market

It's Not Capitalism, it's Crony Capitalism

A good start from :

It's Not Capitalism, it's Crony Capitalism

Excerpt:

The threat to America is this: we have abandoned our core philosophy. Our first principle of this nation as a meritocracy, a free-market economy, where competition drives economic decision-making. In its place, we have allowed a malignancy to fester, a virulent pus-filled bastardized form of economics so corrosive in nature, so dangerously pestilent, that it presents an extinction-level threat to America – both the actual nation and the “idea” of America.

This all-encompassing mutant corruption saps men’s souls, crushes opportunities, and destroys economic mobility. Its a Smash & Grab system of ill-gotten re...



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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of September 11th, 2017

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Promotions

Free eBook - "My Top Strategies for 2017"

 

 

Here's a free ebook for you to check out! 

Phil has a chapter in a newly-released eBook that we think you’ll enjoy.

In My Top Strategies for 2017, Phil's chapter is Secret Santa’s Inflation Hedges for 2017.

This chapter isn’t about risk or leverage. Phil present a few smart, practical ideas you can use as a hedge against inflation as well as hedging strategies designed to assist you in staying ahead of the markets.

Some other great content in this free eBook includes:

 

·       How 2017 Will Affect Oil, the US Dollar and the European Union

...

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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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