Posts Tagged ‘Analyst Research’

Rosenberg: The Truth About Retail Sales Is That They Still Stink

If anyone can explain why the retail sales weren’t really that good, it would be David Rosenberg, over breakfast.  - Ilene 

Rosenberg: The Truth About Retail Sales Is That They Still Stink

Glass of milk with fruits

Courtesy of Vince Veneziani at Clusterstock 

In this morning’s Breakfast With Dave newsletter, analyst David Rosenberg talks last week’s retail sales report.

Don’t believe everything that you read, says Rosie. According to "raw data," retail sales actually FELL1.6% month-over-month in February, and you can’t just blame seasonality for this.

Breakfast With Dave: “It’s always best to look at what consumers do rather than what they think or say. They’re spending — that’s the main thing”. That goes down as the glib remark of the weekend — front page of the Investors Business Daily (Shoppers Perk Up, Lifting Retail Sales, By A Surprise 0.3%). Another pundit said pretty well the same thing in Barron’s and following the data on Friday there was an economist on CNBC who said that you never win by betting against the U.S. consumer.

What a load of you-know-what.

Let’s more closely examine that retail sales report.

First, the raw data actually showed that sales fell 1.6% MoM in February. Now it would be meaningful if February was usually a weak month for sales compared to January so that it would make perfect sense for the seasonal adjustment factor to give the raw data an upward skew. But in fact, retail sales rise over half the time in February. And while, on average, the not seasonally adjusted retail sales data are down 0.4% in each February over the past decade, the reality is that this past February was four times as bad as the norm — not to mention tied for the third worst February since 1998. Really good result, eh?

Second, here we have the greatest stimulus experience in seven decades and retail sales are still down 5% from the pre-recession peak and on a per capital basis are down 8%. Sales are actually lower today than they were in January 2006 — four years ago — even though the population has risen 4.3% over this time. And on a per capita basis, retail sales are no…
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Economy, Analyst Research, Features

Christopher Thornburg’s Awesome Presentation: Why This Bounce Is Fake, And Why We’re Double-Dipping In 2011

Courtesy of Joe Weisenthal and Vince Veneziani at Clusterstock/Business Insider 

RoboticsOrlando PDF

Christopher Thornburg of Beacon Economics recently delivered an excellent presentation on the state of the economy and whether or not the bounce will last.

His answer is: no.

We strongly recommend you flip through it, if only because it’s an excellent overview of the current state of play.

Follow the presentation >

 

 


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The 15 Must-See Charts That Explain The Global Economy

Morgan Stanley: The 15 Must-See Charts That Explain The Global Economy

Courtesy of Vince Veneziani at Clusterstock/Business Insider 

Google Earth moneybag

Morgan Stanley just released a research report that painstakingly details the current state of our global economy.

Inside the 88-page report is a section called "Charts You Can’t Miss." It’s broken down in the following order of countries: Global economy, Europe, Asia (excluding Japan), and Japan. These charts focus on the underlying issues that truly affect our economy.

Credit spreads are at their highest levels ever post-Lehman and Germany’s industrial production is falling. Clearly there’s cause for concern.

If you’ve ever wanted a quick, comprehensive breakdown of the global marketplace, here’s your chance.

Check out these can’t miss charts >


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Saut: The “Selling Stampede” Is Over, Now It’s Time To Dance In The Rain

Saut: The "Selling Stampede" Is Over, Now It’s Time To Dance In The Rain

Courtesy of Joe Weisenthal at Clusterstock 

Prescient Raymond James strategist Jeff Saut says the "selling stampede" which is began calling for in early January is clearly over, but we’re not out of the woods yet:

For example, we entered 2010 in a pretty cautious mode, worried that the first few weeks of the new
year have historically been tricky. Subsequently, we determined the equity markets had fallen into a “selling stampede.” Knowingthat such stampedes tend to last 17 to 25 sessions we remained cautious, but continue to add stocks to our “watch list.” Following the climatic downside deluge of February 4th and 5th, we opined the stampede was abating and recommended tranching into (read:buying partial positions) some of the stocks on our various lists. We still feel that way.That positive view was reinforced last week when the 10-day exponential moving average (EMA) crossed above the 30-day EMA.

Additionally, the 50-DMA is turning up and on February 5th the number of S&P 500 stocks above their respective 50-DMAs had shrunk from 92% to ~19%. While that oversold reading has been somewhat corrected by the ensuing rally, roughly 50% of the S&P 500 stocks still remain below their 50-DMAs. 
Then there was this insight from Minyanville professor Tony Dwyer:

“One indicator that has proven to be an excellent short and intermediate-term buy signal for the S&P 500 is when the percentage of NYSE issues trading above their 10-DMA drops below 10%. The most recent signal was (on) 2/18/10, which represents only the 8th unique instance (rapid multiple signals following the first signal were ignored) in the past 30 years. The average one month gain following the first signal was 5.4%, with amaximum gain of 11.2% and the worst case (and only) loss of 1.31% in 1991.”

Hence, we continue to believe the “selling stampede” is over. To us the question then becomes, will we extend the current rally off February’s “hammer lows,” or will the pattern resemble that of the 1978 and 1979 “October Ouches” whereby the DJIA lost between 10 – 12% in a few short weeks and then based for a month, or two, before giving investors a decent rally. Worth noting is that the DJIA never went decidedly below those “hammer lows,” as can be seen in


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Rosenberg: Here’s Why The Correction Isn’t Over

Rosenberg: Here’s Why The Correction Isn’t Over

Courtesy of Joe Weisenthal at Clusterstock/Business Insider

Mint Tea

Gluskin-Sheff’s David Rosenberg reads the tea leaves on the recent market runup and concludes the correction may not be over, drawing particular attention to volume:

IS THE CORRECTION OVER?  
There is room to have an open mind in both directions, though we believe that there is still more downside than upside risk.  The problem for the bulls is that the market gains have occurred on lower volume, which was down 6% on the 
NYSE yesterday, and the major indices are still stuck below their 50-day moving averages (the only exception is the S&P 600).  

But the bulls will note that the market now does have some technical strength (as outlined in today’s Investors Business Daily).  The major averages have closed in the upper half of their daily ranges for six sessions in a row and often at or close to the highs of the day.  The list of stocks hitting a new high has hit 200 versus 12 those hitting a new low.  Sentiment has turned extremely negative considering that this correction was barely over an 8% down-move but indeed, before it occurred, the Investors Intelligence poll was at 52.2% bulls (18.9% bears) and at the recent lows it was at 35.6% bulls (and 27.8% for the bears).  That is a contrarian positive, at least on a near-term basis.  Moreover, there is a high correlation between the Euro and the S&P 500 and the short positions in the currency is at an all-time high, and as these shorts have to be covered, the dollar has softened a tad off its recent highs and this has corresponded with the rebound in the equity market.   Finally, we have 73% of companies beating their earnings estimate — this has dominated the press, and the fact that tech bellwethers like Hewlett-Packard managed to beat their estimates and raise guidance (as did Deere and Whole Foods) has also helped add some recent enthusiasm in the bullish camp.  This is an exercise to see both points of view, keep an open mind; however, we have not waffling and maintain a cautious view over risk assets for 2010.  This is still a technically-driven market — for confirmation of the sustainability of the rebound (recall that there were four other 5%+ declines during this bear market rally phase) we need to see:

1. Follow throughs (gains of at least 2% consecutively and on…
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Rosenberg: Careful, EVERYONE Is Now Bullish On The Dollar

Rosenberg: Careful, EVERYONE Is Now Bullish On The Dollar

American Money

Courtesy of Vince Veneziani at Clusterstock  

In his latest note, David Rosenberg details the massive sentiment swin from hating the dollar and loving the euro to the mirror opposite.

Breakfast With Dave:

So, as we see in the latest Commitment of Traders report, the massive swing in the U.S. dollar from a huge net short position to a record net long position in the futures and options pits has seen its best days. The net speculative long position that took the greenback up 8% from the lows has surged to an all-time high of 40,972 contracts; even cutting this excess exuberance over the U.S. dollar by half would require more of what we saw yesterday, which is a giveback in the currency. (As confirmation on the excess optimism that now prevails over the greenback, investor optimism on the U.S. dollar (a net 57%) in the just-released Merrill Lynch Global Fund Manager survey hit a 10-year high). So long as the U.S. dollar is softening as sentiment recedes from these lofty levels, risk appetite is bound to come back for a little while, as we saw yesterday with that impressive triple-digit up-move in the Dow.

Rosie Euro Dollar Positions 1

The flip-side, of course, is the Euro, which has an unprecedented amount of net speculative short positions against it. Again, this net short position is now in the process of reversing course and in this process we are likely to see risk assets enjoy a counter-trend bounce. (We should add here that another “defensive” currency that has commanded a lot of attention from the noncommercial accounts is the Japanese Yen, which also has the most pronounced net speculative long position in nine weeks). These are rallies worth renting but not owning.

 

Rosie Euro Dollar Positions 2

 


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Jeff Saut: The Time To Buy This Dip Is Right About… NOW

Jeff Saut: The Time To Buy This Dip Is Right About… NOW

Courtesy of Joe Weisenthal at Clusterstock

wall street snowstorm slideshow

wall street bull

Raymond James strategist Jeff Saut has been on top of his market-timing game, calling both the runup and the recent dip.

So you might want to pay attention to the fact that he’s licking his chops again, at least per his latest weekly call:

—-

We revisit The Great Blizzard of 1888 this morning because of the weather that has crippled the Northeast corridor over the past few weeks. Fortunately, communities are more capable of dealing with such storms today than they were more than a century ago. Still, the loss of productivity is likely going to be impactful in some of the upcoming economic reports.

That said, over the long weekend we studied the D-J Industrial Average (DJIA) chart from 1888 and found that March 11 – March 14 marked a bottom for the stock market. Also of interest is that today is session 18 in the envisioned “selling stampede” so often discussed in these missives.

For new readers, “selling stampedes” tend to last 17 to 25 sessions, with only one- to three-day counter trend rally attempts before they exhaust themselves on the downside. While it is true that some stampedes have extended for 25 to 30 sessions, it is rare to have one last for more than 30 days. Accordingly, we are getting increasingly interested in stocks again, and have been adding
names to our “watch list.” As for Dow Theory, which we have often been asked…
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Here’s Why The Financial System Isn’t Out Of The Woods, And Still Has A Ton Of Deleveraging To Do

Here’s Why The Financial System Isn’t Out Of The Woods, And Still Has A Ton Of Deleveraging To Do

Courtesy of Vince Veneziani at The Business Insider/Clusterstock

This morning’s JPMorgan (JPM) earnings report helped to reinforce the conventional wisdom that the worst is over and that the banking system is wobbly but on the mend.

But what if that’s not so.

A recent report from Deutsche Bank’s Bill Prophet, entitled "Alternative Universe," foretells a story of approaching disaster and even goes so far as to say "the health of the US commercial banking system will inevitably get worse before it gets better. And this has undeniable consequences for the rates market, if not Fed policy."

The reason? Bank balance sheets have hardly shrunk at all. This applies to both commercial and residential real estate.

Says Prophet on RMBS:

Nevertheless, we find it inconceivable that these assets are being marked anywhere close to their recoverable value, and the reality is that commercial bank exposure to them is as large now as it was 12 months ago. And in fact when we look at the entire $2tr portfolio of residential real estate assets on bank balance sheets (which would of course include the home-equity loans shown above), we reach a similar conclusion. Namely, as of the end of Q3-’09, the value of “home mortgage” assets has declined by just 1.6% from the end of ‘08 (see Chart 7).  Similar to CRE, these assets could be worth hundreds of billions of dollars less than where they are currently being marked.
 

Now let’s see the current picture of bank health ->

 


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Jeff Saut: Bond Market Starting To Break Down, Turn Cautious On Stocks

Jeff Saut: Bond Market Starting To Break Down, Turn Cautious On Stocks

Courtesy of Joe Weisenthal at Clusterstock

Raymond James strategist Jeff Saut is doing the wise thing and taking another week fo relax with family — we advise it — but in a brief note he warns of the breakdown in bonds.

—-

Indeed, we have been unabashedly bullish on most asset classes since March 2, 2009, although we have turned cautious a few times over the past eight months. To be sure, said asset classes were at least three standard deviations undervalued back in March. Since then, most have normalized to median valuation levels.  Accordingly, as we enter the New Year, we are once again turning cautious because the Treasury bond market is breaking down (read: higher interest rates) and the U.S. dollar is rallying. After being dollar-negative since 4Q01, we turned neutral to constructive on the “buck” in 4Q07 and recommended shutting down all negative U.S. dollar positions. More recently, we suggested the “greenback” might be in for a pretty decent rally. If so, the ubiquitous “dollar carry trade” is in jeopardy of unwinding with downside consequences for most asset classes.  Therefore, we think it prudent to “bank” some trading profits and hedge some investment positions as we approach the New Year.
 
That said, we still believe the nascent economic recovery will gain traction in 2010, and that earnings comparisons will look good in 1H10.  The question then becomes just how much of that has already been discounted by the 68% rally off of the March lows?  Also worth consideration is if this is a rally in an ongoing trading range stock market, or the beginning of a new secular bull market.  Currently, we don’t have a clue, but are happy that we have enjoyed the eight-month rise.  We think the trick from here, at least in the short/intermediate-term, is to protect the profits that have been made.

10-year tnote

 


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Rosenberg: If The Banks Don’t Extend Credit Soon, The Market Is Toast

chart

We’re not sure how much stock to put into correlations such as this one — especially since LOTS of charts have this dual-hump pattern over the last several years — but this is still some interesting commentary from Gluskin-Sheff’s David Rosenberg on the connection between monetary velocity and the stock market.

————

Chart 1 maps out the S&P 500 with money velocity (GDP/M1 ratio).  There is a
90% correlation between the two.  It is one thing to have the Fed pump liquidity
into the system but it is quite another for the liquidity to be re-leveraged into credit
and recycled into the economy.   

The Fed’s easing program is over two years old and the rampant Fed balance
sheet expansion 15 months old, and still to this day, what the commercial banks
have done (to Obama’s wrath) with all that liquidity is to keep it as cash on their
balance sheet to the tune of $1.2 trillion.  We’re not sure why Obama is as rankled
as he is because the banks are in fact lending out a good chunk of that Fed-
induced liquidity — right back to Uncle Sam (the banks now own a record $1.3
trillion of government securities).  

Back to the chart — there is obviously a close connection between money turnover
and the stock market.  But we can get periodic divergences as we did in the first
leg of the rally in 2003.  But the carry-through from 2004 to 2007 hinged critically
on that multi-year acceleration in money velocity.  If we don’t see the banks begin
to extend credit in 2010, it is hard to see the 2009 bounce from oversold lows as
being sustained in the coming year.   

 


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Zero Hedge

Greatest Economy Ever: Small Businesses Forced To Use GoFundMe To Stay Solvent

Courtesy of ZeroHedge View original post here.

While most people think of GoFundMe as a way to raise money for medical debt, funeral costs or small personal items, things have gone so well for our "greatest economy ever" that it is now being used as a tool by small businesses to raise cash. 

Struggling businesses are now using the site, ranging from comic book stores to drive-in movie theaters, according to the Wall Street Journal. Small businesses h...



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The Technical Traders

VIX Warns Of Imminent Market Correction

Courtesy of Technical Traders

The VIX is warning that a market peak may be setting up in the global markets and that investors should be cautious of the extremely low price in the VIX.  These extremely low prices in the VIX are typically followed by some type of increased volatility in the markets.

The US Federal Reserve continues to push an easy money policy and has recently begun acquiring more dept allowing a deeper move towards a Quantitative Easing stance.  This move, along with investor confidence in the US markets, has prompted early warning signs that the market has reached near extreme levels/peaks. You can get all of my trade ideas by ...



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Phil's Favorites

What is an oligarch?

 

What is an oligarch?

Boris Yeltsin shakes hands with Russia’s most powerful businessmen in Moscow. AP Photo

Courtesy of Joel Samuels, University of South Carolina

With the impeachment hearings for President Donald Trump under way, several American diplomats and ...



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Biotech

Why telling people with diabetes to use Walmart insulin can be dangerous advice

Reminder: We are available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

Why telling people with diabetes to use Walmart insulin can be dangerous advice

A vial of insulin. Prices for the drug, crucial for those with diabetes, have soared in recent years. Oleksandr Nagaiets/Shutterstock.com

Courtesy of Jeffrey Bennett, Vanderbilt University

About 7.4 million people ...



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Insider Scoop

Glass House Group Appoints Graham Farrar As President

Courtesy of Benzinga

Glass House Group, a California-based cannabis and hemp company, earlier this week appointed Graham Farrar as president.

In his new role, Graham will oversee the company’s short and long-term business strategies, budgets and operations, and report up to Glass House Group CEO Kyle Kazan.

A long-time entrepreneur and an original team member of both Sonos (NASDAQ: SONO...



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Chart School

Dow Jones cycle update and are we there yet?

Courtesy of Read the Ticker

Today the Dow and the SP500 are making new all time highs. However all long and strong bull markets end on a new all time high. Today no one knows how many new all time highs are to go, maybe 1 or 100+ more to go, who knows! So are we there yet?

readtheticker.com combine market tools from Richard Wyckoff, Jim Hurst and William Gann to understand and forecast price action. In concept terms (in order), demand and supply, market cycles, and time to price analysis. 

Cycle are excellent to understand the wider picture, after all markets do not move in a straight line and bear markets do follow bull markets. 



CHART 1: The Dow Jones Industrial average with the 900 period cycle.

A) Red Cycle:...

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Digital Currencies

Is Bitcoin a Macro Asset?

 

Is Bitcoin a Macro Asset?

Courtesy of 

As part of Coindesk’s popup podcast series centered around today’s Invest conference, I answered a few questions for Nolan Bauerly about Bitcoin from a wealth management perspective. I decided in December of 2017 that investing directly into crypto currencies was unnecessary and not a good use of a portfolio’s allocation slots. I remain in this posture today but I am openminded about how this may change in the future.

You can listen to this short exchange below:

...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

Silver Testing This Support For The First Time In 8-Years!

Courtesy of Chris Kimble

Its been a good while since Silver bulls could say that it is testing support. Well, this week that can be said! Will this support test hold? Silver Bulls sure hope so!

This chart looks at Silver Futures over the past 10-years. Silver has spent the majority of the past 8-years inside of the pink shaded falling channel, as it has created lower highs and lower lows.

Silver broke above the top of this falling channel around 90-days ago at (1). It quickly rallied over 15%, before creating a large bearish reversal pattern, around 5-weeks after the bre...



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Lee's Free Thinking

Today's Fed POMO TOMO FOMC Alphabet Soup Unspin

Courtesy of Lee Adler

But make no mistake, if the Fed wants money rates to stay down by another quarter, it will need to imagineer even more money.

That’s on top of the $281 billion it has already imagineered into existence since addressing its “one-off” repo market emergency on September 17. This came via  “Temporary” Repo Man Operations money, and $70.6 billion in Permanent Open Market Operations (POMO) money.

By my calculations that averages out to $7.4 billion per business day. That works out to a monthly pace of $155 billion or so.

If they keep this up, it will be more than enough to absorb every penny of new Treasury supply. That supply had caused the system to run out of money in mid September.  This flood of paper had been inundati...



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Mapping The Market

How IPOs Are Priced

Via Jean Luc 

Funny but probably true:

...

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Members' Corner

Despacito - How to Make Money the Old-Fashioned Way - SLOWLY!

Are you ready to retire?  

For most people, the purpose of investing is to build up enough wealth to allow you to retire.  In general, that's usually enough money to reliably generate a year's worth of your average income, each year into your retirement so that that, plus you Social Security, should be enough to pay your bills without having to draw down on your principle.

Unfortunately, as the last decade has shown us, we can't count on bonds to pay us more than 3% and the average return from the stock market over the past 20 years has been erratic - to say the least - with 4 negative years (2000, 2001, 2002 and 2008) and 14 positives, though mostly in the 10% range on the positives.  A string of losses like we had from 2000-02 could easily wipe out a decades worth of gains.

Still, the stock market has been better over the last 10 (7%) an...



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Promotions

Free eBook - "My Top Strategies for 2017"

 

 

Here's a free ebook for you to check out! 

Phil has a chapter in a newly-released eBook that we think you’ll enjoy.

In My Top Strategies for 2017, Phil's chapter is Secret Santa’s Inflation Hedges for 2017.

This chapter isn’t about risk or leverage. Phil present a few smart, practical ideas you can use as a hedge against inflation as well as hedging strategies designed to assist you in staying ahead of the markets.

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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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