Posts Tagged ‘bear market’

Put on Your Party Hats – It’s Time to Party for Another Decade!

Mish is a picture of optimism compared to Robert Prechter (of Elliott Wave Fame).  Robert Prechter is wrong, instead of dropping to 1,000, the Dow may only drop to 5,000, and even that may be too pessimistic in Mish’s eyes. – Ilene 

Put on Your Party Hats – It’s Time to Party for Another Decade!

Courtesy of Mish 

I don’t know about you but I am psyched. The prospects of an ongoing party for another decade are extremely good as the following chart shows.

Dow Jones Industrial Average – 1999 to Present 

click on chart for sharper image

Market participants put on their party hats and started cheering in 1999 when the DOW crossed 10,000 for the first time. They have been cheering pretty much nonstop ever since.

Admittedly there was a bit of a party lag between early 2005 and late 2008 but the party hats have been working overtime since mid-2008 as shown below.

Dow Jones Industrial Average – October 2010 to Present 

click on chart for sharper image

Lost Decades Comparison

Please bear in mind that some pessimists liken the above behavior to a period of stunning underperformance of the Japanese Nikkei Index over the last two decades.

Japan’s Two Lost Decades

click on chart for sharper image

The Perpetually Optimistic Mish

Being the ever-optimist that I am, I want to quickly point out that while Japan essentially went straight down over two decades, the US by comparison has put in stunning outperformance by going nowhere.

Top hat and champagne glass held aloft for New Year's

Indeed, the Dow Jones Index is remarkably sitting exactly where it was in April of 1999, over 10 years ago while the Nikkei over the same timeframe fell by about 50%.

Optimists such as myself have only one thing to say: Hallelujah!

Meanwhile doom and gloomers like Robert Prechter think the Dow will fall to 1,000.

To that I say "Poppycock" (pretty harsh language indeed for those who know me well).

By my optimistic comparison, I think the Dow’s downside is 5,000. That is a stunning 400% more optimistic appraisal of the current state of affairs than Prechter.

Furthermore, I freely admit that the DOW, instead of dropping, just may meander around 10,000 for another decade.

Wow. Except for public pension plan assumptions, imagine the parties we can have over that!

Mike "Mish" Shedlock

 


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DAVID ROSENBERG: IS DOW 5,000 REALLY POSSIBLE?

DAVID ROSENBERG: IS DOW 5,000 REALLY POSSIBLE?

Courtesy of The Pragmatic Capitalist 

A Syrian Brown Bear stands in the water as she cools down at Jerusalem's Biblical Zoo June 22, 2010. REUTERS/Baz Ratner (JERUSALEM - Tags: ANIMALS ENVIRONMENT)

Some deep thoughts from David Rosenberg on the likelihood of a secular bear market and potential new lows:

Well, well, so much for consensus views.  Like the one we woke up to on Monday  morning recommending that bonds be sold and equities be bought on the news  of China’s “peg” decision.  As we said on Monday, did the 20%-plus yuan appreciation from 2005 to 2008 really alter the investment landscape all that much? It looks like Mr. Market is coming around to the view that all China managed to really accomplish was to shift the focus away from its rigid FX policy to Germany’s rigid approach towards fiscal stimulus.

What is becoming clearer, especially after the latest reports on housing starts, permits, resales and builder sentiment surveys, is that housing is already double dipping in the U.S.  The MBA statistics just came out for the week of June 18 and the new purchase index fell 1.2% – down 36.5% from year-ago levels and that year-ago level itself was down 22% from its year-ago level. Capish, paisan? So far, June is averaging 14.5% below May’s level and May was crushed 18% sequentially, so do not expect what is likely to be an ugly new home sales report for May today to be just a one-month wonder.  Meanwhile, the widespread view out of the economics community is that we will see at least 3% growth in the second half of the year: fat chance of that. What is fascinating is how the ECRI, which was celebrated by Wall Street research houses a year ago, is being maligned today for acting as an impostor — not the indicator it is advertised to be because it gets re-jigged to fit the cycle.

From our lens, there is nothing wrong in trying to improve the predictive abilities of these leading indicators.  Still — it is a comment on how Wall Street researchers are incentivized to be bullish because nobody we know criticized the ECRI as it bounced off the lows (not least of which our debating pal, James Grant).  For a truly wonderful critique of the ballyhooed report that was released yesterday basically accusing the ECRI index as fitting the data points to the cycle


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Big Bear Markets: More Than Falling Stock Prices

Big Bear Markets: More Than Falling Stock Prices 
Many infamous authoritarian regimes emerged during or after big bear markets

Courtesy of Elliott Wave International

Crowd Carrying Protest Signs

Fear and uncertainty that drive a severe bear market are the same emotions which can set the stage for authoritarianism, in most any nation. 

"Bear markets of sufficient size appear to bring about a desire to slaughter groups of successful people. In 1793-1794, radical Frenchmen guillotined countless members of high society. In the 1930s, Stalin slaughtered Ukrainians. In the 1940s, Nazis slaughtered Jews. In the 1970s, Communists in Cambodia and China slaughtered the affluent. In 1998, after their country’s financial collapse, Indonesians went on a rampage and slaughtered Chinese merchants." - Bob Prechter, Wave Principle of Human Social Behavior, p. 270

Why do authoritarian tendencies emerge only during bear markets in stocks?

"As society becomes more fearful, many individuals yearn for the safety and order promised by strong, controlling leaders." - The Socionomist, May 2010

Bob Prechter’s new science of socionomics explains that stock market fluctuations mirror trends in people’s collective mood. In simple terms, when the market is buoyant, it indicates positive social mood; the opposite when a bear market takes over.

The fascinating part is that because the stock market and social mood trend closely together, a forecaster can apply Elliott wave analysis to both — and predict both.

Generally, widespread brutalities and wars do not follow the first phase of a bear market. Extreme violence, when it does occur, often follows the worst part of the market’s downturn — like the end of the Great Depression, a negative social mood period that ultimately ushered in World War II.

But even during the first phase, a negative social mood grows. So, if a forecaster determines correctly where in the wave structure social mood resides, he can make educated forecasts about what will follow in society — given what has happened before under similar social mood trends.

Authoritarianism is a subject of heated discussions these days, which makes it a timely topic for a socionomic study. The latest, two-part issue of the monthly Socionomist gives you just that: A look at historic trends and specific forecasts for the years ahead.

Learn How to Anticipate and Prepare for Political Conflict and War, Bull Markets and Bear Markets. The 118-page Independent Investor eBook covers a vast array of investment topics and exposes myths that mainstream investors accept as fact. Once you learn
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A BEAR MARKET OR JUST A CORRECTION?

A BEAR MARKET OR JUST A CORRECTION?

Courtesy of The Pragmatic Capitalist 

Bull in bear costume

Readers have likely noted my decidedly more bearish tone of late.  Coming into 2010 I was fairly optimistic about the equity markets and the economy in the first half of the year with expectations of a second half slow-down.   The market appeared likely to unfold in exactly that manner, but the developments in China and Greece looked like game changers to me as the global turmoil unfolded a bit faster than I expected.  So much so that I initiated my first net short position in over two years as the S&P surged to 1200.  Just a few short weeks later the market was literally crashing.

But as the market continues to decline we have to ask ourselves if fear isn’t getting a bit ahead of fundamentals?  Are investors too bearish and pricing in too much negativity or are they not bearish enough?  In other words, is this a new bear market or this just a correction? This was the question David Rosenberg asked himself in last Thursday’s missive:

“Well, so far the S&P 500 is down nearly 10% from the highs, so this is indeed a correction thus far but more often than not, declines like these morph into something more severe — even when we are in durable economic expansion phases like 1987 and 1998. This recovery is tentative, at best. But the numbers we are looking at is a 50% retracement of the March 2009-April 2010 runup, which means 943 on the S&P 500 and the reality that lows in the market, whether they be interim or more fundamental, tend to occur with the index 20% below the 200-day moving average, which at this stage would be 879. So at least we have a defined range of when to begin to put money to work. A break below that range would indicate that Mr. Market is sniffing out a double-dip recession, not just a visible slowing.

The ECRI leading index is down to a 47-week low, which is pointing towards much softer growth ahead and the Shanghai equity index is off nearly 30% and perhaps giving us a reading on global growth prospects. The one thing we do know is that the last time China was down 30%, this was a train hardly worth boarding in terms of how to be positioned


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‘Defensive’ Stocks: Are They the Ticket in a Downturn?

‘Defensive’ Stocks: Are They the Ticket in a Downturn? 
In a severe sell-off, 99 percent of ALL stocks can fall.

By Elliott Wave International

Scotsmen waving money

Approximately three out of four stocks go down in a bear market. This ratio doesn’t just apply to high beta names; historically, 75 percent of all stocks go down when the general market falls.

Considering we could be headed into a severe bear market (read Bob Prechter’s latest special two-issue Elliott Wave Theorist, if you haven’t yet), we could see more than 75 percent of stocks take a dive. In that case, even a basket of "defensive" or "quality" names isn’t likely to help your portfolio. What good are dividends when you’re losing far, far more through capital depreciation? 

On May 20, when the DJIA lost 376 points, 497 out of the S&P 500 stocks ended the day lower. (In other words, 99 percent of stocks fell.) Yet a financial television host recommended "defensive" names the day after. Wouldn’t his viewers be better served if he said, "You may want to step aside for now"? Apparently, stocks of one kind or another must be recommended — no matter what the market is doing or is expected to do.

How about "quality" stocks that don’t fit the "defensive" category, like blue chips or major technology names? The 1973-1974 bear market provides a clue. The "nifty fifty" stocks were "glamour" stocks; pundits said the "nifty fifty" should "be bought and never sold." However, by the time the bear market bottomed, 

  • Polaroid cratered 91% (eventually went bankrupt)
  • Avon nose-dived 86%
  • Xerox fell 71%
  • Standard Brands Paint (eventually went bankrupt) 

Here’s what Prechter said on the matter in his September 2009 Theorist"When the stock market overall ended its bear market in the fourth quarter of 1974, the nifty fifty had fallen substantially from their highs, and many investors continued to hold them under the belief that they would come roaring back. But they underperformed most other groups of stocks throughout the rest of the 1970s and into the 1980s." [emphasis added]

Similarly, big-name stocks that fell in 2007-2009 have yet to come close to fully recovering. Today’s favored stocks could likewise nose-dive. 

Vegas Vacation

Learn from the past. Avoid the mistake of holding a defensive or quality stock "all the way down."

*****

Read Part One of Robert Prechter’s Latest Two-Part, April-May Theorists FREE
The April-May Theorist series entitled "Deadly Bearish Big Picture" reveals a lucid…
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This Bear Market Is Nowhere Near A “Buying Opportunity,” Says Rosenberg

This Bear Market Is Nowhere Near A "Buying Opportunity," Says Rosenberg

Courtesy of Henry Blodget at Clusterstock

Some not-so-fun facts from David Rosenberg of Gluskin Sheff:

We went back to the history books and found that at fundamental lows in the S&P 500, whether they be in real bear markets or in severe corrections in a bull market, the index bottoms when it gets 13% below the 50-day moving average and 24% below the 200-day moving average.  As of Friday’s close, we are talking about a market that is barely below the 50-day m.a. now and 5% below the 200- day moving averages. 

Message — keep your powder dry.

[Note: The chart below from stockcharts.com suggests that Dave has transposed the current numbers: We're about 5% below the 50-day and basically even with the 200-day...]

S&P 500 May 31 2010

Image: Stockcharts.com stockcharts.com

See Also: 

JPMorgan: Here’s Three Signs That We’ve Hit The Market Bottom


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Dow Jones Masochism

Dow Jones Masochism

Courtesy of Joshua M. Brown, The Reformed Broker 

Female devil holding whip, flames in background

Brett Arends has a story up over at WSJ that makes the case for more pain – that the March ’09 bottom wasn’t quite painful enough to have been THE bottom for this cycle.  The article’s an amusement park for shorts, but does a nice job categorizing the items that could lead to another brutal beating for stocks.

The slide that began in 1969 didn’t end until 1982. The slump after 1929 didn’t give way until the late 1940s. Japan’s gloom is still with us.

In general, the bigger the bull-market boom, the bigger and nastier the bear market that follows. The bull market of the ’80s and ’90s was the biggest on record. So expect the bear that follows to be ugly and tenacious.

And for some perspective, Lisa Haney throws in this Dow Jones Industrial Average bear market guide…

The 2007-2009 plunge is the worst on record, but according to some, not nearly damaging enough considering the run-up in asset prices that preceeded it.

Source:

May’s Big Selloff Could Be Just The Beginning (WSJ) 


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TECHNICAL PERSPECTIVE: WHERE’S THE VOLUME?

TECHNICAL PERSPECTIVE: WHERE’S THE VOLUME?

Courtesy of The Pragmatic Capitalist 

By Decision Point:

FROM A SUBSCRIBER: Hi Carl. I’ve never written but have followed you for many years (since AOL) and have learned more about reading the market from you than any other source. You have such a clear and common sense view that it is really refreshing. I love the new daily blogs and am so glad Erin is learning the ropes. I would write her directly, but don’t see her email address anywhere. I rarely disagree with what is said, but in this case I am very suspicious of a bullish interpretation of today’s (May 27) rally, mostly due to the low volume. It seems more like a bear market, short covering rally to me. Was wondering what you think of the volume issue. Thanks for any comments. 

Thanks for the compliment!

I try not to engage in discussions in order to reconcile differences of opinion about the market, because, even if I manage to convince my “opponent”, it doesn’t mean I’ll be right about the outcome. We try to be methodical in our analysis and clear in presenting our conclusions.

After several days of sloppy, downward-sliding price action, on Thursday the market finally had the first day of what could be a full rebound from very oversold conditions. Sloppy action in oversold conditions signals a very dangerous situation, one from which a crash can result, and on Thursday we breathed our first conditional sigh of relief.

While we have emphasized the danger involved “buying into weakness” with oversold markets, we have believed that the odds favor an end to the correction because we are technically in a long-term bull market, and corrections rarely morph into bear markets in those conditions.

It is true that volume was pathetic, but volume has been unimpressive throughout this bull market, and for Thursday there is also the issue of the upcoming Memorial Day weekend. People are leaving town early.

We can also see a clear descending wedge pattern, a bullish pattern which has a high reliability for resolving to the upside.

Chart

Most important is our philosophy that price is primary, breadth and volume are secondary. Not that we don’t look at breadth and volume, but they need to be subjectively interpreted based upon the bull or bear bias of the market. As a result, none of our mechanical timing…
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Bigger Than A ’10% Correction’?

Every Big Bear Grew From a Cub

By Elliott Wave International

Grizzly Bear

The famous "10% correction" that market pundits talk about sounds so nice and tidy, so predictable and tolerable. It’s as if this "cute little correction" came neatly wrapped, like an M&M candy character, and smiled at you and your family after you open the box.

If only it were so.

"If all the market ever did on the downside was dip 10% once every two years, then investing would be easier than shooting fish in a barrel. Obviously, this is not the case. The fact is that the stock market’s movements are a fractal. Declines come in widely varying sizes." - The Elliott Wave Theorist, December 2001

There is no way to know in advance whether a particular market downturn will fall 11%, 35% or 89%. Even the Wave Principle only forecasts probabilities-- not certainties. One thing that is certain — every bear market reached a 10% drop before prices fell even further.

And another near-certainty is that too many money managers will use the phrase "buying weakness" when the market falls 10%. On May 7, after the Dow Jones had fallen several hundred points in a few days, two money managers being interviewed side by side said in effect, "Buy." Not a word was said about caution. Not a word was offered about even the possibility of a major trend change in the market.

On the other hand, it was refreshing to hear a representative of a fund family say, "I don’t know why anyone needs to be a hero, and try to catch the bottom."

You may be tempted to jump back in because the market has recently "corrected." Yet consider what EWI’s Short Term Update subscribers read on May 7 — ". . .we would caution that some of history’s largest stock declines have occurred only after stocks were deeply oversold."

Two key features of the Elliott Wave Principle is its ability to establish a price target for the current trend, and a time range.

In his latest Elliott Wave Theorist (a two-part April-May issue), Robert Prechter tells why market participants should look far beyond a mere 10%-15% move in the now-unfolding trend.

Read Part One of Robert Prechter’s Latest Two-Part, April-May Theorists FREE

The April-May Theorist series entitled "Deadly Bearish Big Picture" reveals a lucid picture for 2010-2016. It’s the flipside of Robert Prechter’s February 2009 Forecast for a ‘Sharp and Scary’ Rally. Click here to download the 10-page part one for FREE now.


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“On Schedule for a Very, Very Long Bear Market”

Prechter on Yahoo! Finance: "On Schedule for a Very, Very Long Bear Market"

Via Elliott Wave International 

Robert Prechter discussed the recent global sell-off that has sent all major U.S. averages 10% below their 2010 highs with Yahoo! Finance Tech Ticker host Aaron Task on May 20, 2010. Prechter says that the current climate shows that "we’re in a wave of recognition" where the fundamentals are catching up to the technicals and that it’s time to prepare for a "long way down."

For more information from Robert Prechter, download a FREE 10-page issue of the Elliott Wave Theorist. It challenges current recovery hype with hard facts, independent analysis, and insightful charts. Robert discusses why he things the worst is NOT over and what you can do to safeguard your financial future.


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Zero Hedge

For The First Time Since The Crisis, Companies Spent More On Buybacks And Dividends Than They Earned...

Courtesy of ZeroHedge View original post here.

It will hardly come as a surprise to many, but according to the latest cash flow analysis from Goldman Sachs, 2018 was a record year for S&P 500 cash spending: not only did aggregate spending on capex, R&D, cash acquisitions, dividends, and share repurchases rose by 25% to $2.8 trillion, "the fastest year/year growth in 30 years"...

...



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Phil's Favorites

Fed's Balance Sheet Spikes by $253 Billion, Now Topping $4 Trillion

Courtesy of Pam Martens

By Pam Martens and Russ Martens: October 18, 2019 ~

Shhh! Don’t tell Congress that the Federal Reserve is back to electronically creating money out of thin air to throw at a liquidity problem (of an, as yet, undetermined origin) on Wall Street. And be sure not to mention that the Fed’s balance sheet has shot up in a period of just 42 days by $253 billion. And, of course, don’t remind Congress that before the last Wall Street crisis was over the Fed had secretly, with no oversight from Congress, piled up ...



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Insider Scoop

48 Biggest Movers From Yesterday

Courtesy of Benzinga

Gainers
  • Hepion Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ: HEPA) shares climbed 43.2% to close at $3.58 on Thursday after the company announced the publication of a research article, "A Pan-Cyclophilin Inhibitor, CRV431, Decreases Fibrosis and Tumor Development in Chronic Liver Disease Models," in the peer-reviewed Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.
  • Synthesis Energy Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ: SES) rose 26.9% to close at $9.20 after surging 12.24% on Wednesday.
  • Assembly Biosciences, Inc...


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Kimble Charting Solutions

Bank Index Breakout? Stock Market Bulls Sure Hope So

Courtesy of Chris Kimble

One of the most important sectors of the stock market is the banking industry and bank stocks.

When the banks are healthy, the economy is likely doing well. And when bank stocks are participating in a market rally, then it bodes well for the broader stock market.

In today’s chart, we look at the Bank Index (BKX).

As you can see, the banks have been in a falling channel for the past 20 months. As well, the banks have been lagging the broader market during this time as well – see the Ratio in the bottom half of the chart above.

That said, th...



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The Technical Traders

Currencies Show A Shift to Safety And Maturity - What Does It Mean?

Courtesy of Technical Traders

Recent rotation in multiple foreign currencies hints at the fact that a new stage of the “Capital Shift” process is taking place and that skilled technical investors need to pay very close attention to how these currencies continue to react over the next 3 to 6+ months.  In the recent past, most of the world’s foreign currencies were declining in value while the US Dollar continued to strengthen.  In fact, we authored many research articles about these trends and how weakness in foreign currencies will drive new foreign investment into the US stock markets for two simple reasons; strength and security. 

Now that a few of the world’s most ...



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Chart School

Review of Andrew CardWell RSI with Wyckoff price waves

Courtesy of Read the Ticker

RSI measures relative strength of price action of a set period versus prior set periods. It helps review the price swings or waves, the power of each price thrust into new ground, or lack of it. Price thrust like many things relies on energy, and energy is not a constant, it has a birth, a life and a death and relative strength helps us see that cycle. 

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Digital Currencies

Zuck Delays Libra Launch Date Due To Issues "Sensitive To Society"

Courtesy of ZeroHedge View original post here.

Authored by William Suberg via CoinTelegraph.com,

Facebook is taking a much more careful approach to Libra than its previous projects, CEO Mark Zuckerberg has confirmed. 

“Obviously we want to move forward at some point soon [and] not have this take many years to roll out,” he said. “But ...



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Lee's Free Thinking

Look Out Bears! Fed New QE Now Up to $165 Billion

Courtesy of Lee Adler

I have been warning for months that the Fed would need new QE to counter the impact of massive waves of Treasury supply. I thought that that would come later, rather than sooner. Sorry folks, wrong about that. The NY Fed announced another round of new TOMO (Temporary Open Market Operations) today.

In addition to the $75 billion in overnight repos that the Fed issued and has been rolling over since Tuesday, next week the Fed will issue another $90 billion. They’ll come in the form of three $30 billion, 14 day repos to be offered next week.

That brings the new Fed QE to a total of $165 billion. Even in the worst days of the financial crisis, I can’t remember the Fed ballooning its balance sheet by $165 bi...



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Biotech

The Big Pharma Takeover of Medical Cannabis

Reminder: We are available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

The Big Pharma Takeover of Medical Cannabis

Courtesy of  , Visual Capitalist

The Big Pharma Takeover of Medical Cannabis

As evidence of cannabis’ many benefits mounts, so does the interest from the global pharmaceutical industry, known as Big Pharma. The entrance of such behemoths will radically transform the cannabis industry—once heavily stigmatized, it is now a potentially game-changing source of growth for countless co...



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Mapping The Market

How IPOs Are Priced

Via Jean Luc 

Funny but probably true:

...

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Members' Corner

Despacito - How to Make Money the Old-Fashioned Way - SLOWLY!

Are you ready to retire?  

For most people, the purpose of investing is to build up enough wealth to allow you to retire.  In general, that's usually enough money to reliably generate a year's worth of your average income, each year into your retirement so that that, plus you Social Security, should be enough to pay your bills without having to draw down on your principle.

Unfortunately, as the last decade has shown us, we can't count on bonds to pay us more than 3% and the average return from the stock market over the past 20 years has been erratic - to say the least - with 4 negative years (2000, 2001, 2002 and 2008) and 14 positives, though mostly in the 10% range on the positives.  A string of losses like we had from 2000-02 could easily wipe out a decades worth of gains.

Still, the stock market has been better over the last 10 (7%) an...



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Promotions

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Phil has a chapter in a newly-released eBook that we think you’ll enjoy.

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