Posts Tagged ‘double dip’

Albert Edwards Explains How The Leading Indicator Is Already Back Into Recession Territory And Why The Japan “Ice Age” Is Coming

Albert Edwards Explains How The Leading Indicator Is Already Back Into Recession Territory And Why The Japan "Ice Age" Is Coming

Greenland

Courtesy of Tyler Durden

Albert Edwards reverts to his favorite economic concept, the "Ice Age" in his latest commentary piece, presenting another piece in the puzzle of similarities between the Japanese experience and that which the US is currently going through. A.E. boldly goes where Goldman only recently has dared to tread, by claiming that he expects negative GDP – not in 2011, but by the end of this year.  After all, if one looks beneath the headlines of even the current data set, it is not only the ECRI, but the US Coference Board’s Leading Index, Albert explains, that confirms that we are already in a recesion.

If one takes out the benefit of the steep yield curve as an input to the Leading Indicator metric, and a curve inversion physically impossible due to ZIRP and the zero bound already reaching out as far out as the 2 Year point (it appears the 2 Year may break below 0.5% this week), the result indicates that the US economy is already firmly in recession territory. Edwards explains further: "one of the key components for Conference Board leading indicator is the shape of the yield curve (10y-Fed Funds). This has been regularly adding 0.3-0.4% per month to the overall indicator, which is now falling mom! The simple fact is that with Fed Funds at zero, it is totally ridiculous to suggest there is any information content in the steep yield curve, which will now never predict a recession. Without this yield curve nonsense this key lead indicator is already predicting a recession."

All too obvious double dip aside, Edwards focuses on the disconnect between bonds and stocks, and synthesizes it as follows: "investors are finally accepting that what is going on in the West is indeed very similar to Japan a decade ago. For years my attempts to draw this parallel have been met with hoots of derision  but finally the penny is dropping." The primary disconnect in asset classes as the Ice Age unravels, for those familiar with Edwards work, is the increasing shift away from stocks and into bonds, probably best summarized by the chart below comparing global bond and equity yields – note the increasing decoupling. This is prefaced as follows:…
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ECRI Leading Indicator Plunges Deeper Into Double Dip Territory As Stocks Turn Green

ECRI Leading Indicator Plunges Deeper Into Double Dip Territory As Stocks Turn Green

Courtesy of Tyler Durden

The ECRI Leading Indicator has just moved further into certain recession territory, hitting -10.7 for the most recent week (the previous revised number is -10.5). The market goes green on the news, as the Liberty 33 traders have done their job for the day and are off to the Hamptons. And what is so odd about the market reaction one may ask – bad news are as always priced in, as the apocalypse is nothing that a little money printing can’t fix, while minimal upside surprises (soon to be revised far lower) are sufficient to move the market higher by over 100 points intraday. Hopefully the HFT operators unionize and go on strike soon in demanding greater pay, and get the Greek trucker treatment as a result, because this market is not even a joke anymore.


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Rosenberg: Fade The Volumeless Rally As “The Market Is Completely Unprepared For 500K Claims And Sub 50 ISM”

Rosenberg: Fade The Volumeless Rally As "The Market Is Completely Unprepared For 500K Claims And Sub 50 ISM"

Courtesy of Tyler Durden, Zero Hedge 

Rosie’s market commentary from today is quite colorful, taking on both Barton Biggs (why bother) and Richard Russell as inflection point contrarians (we fully expect Barton Biggs who has now generated enough commissions for his broker to kill his entire P&L for the decade, to go bearish in about two weeks in keeping with his latest standing wave oscillation from one extreme to another). Rosie discusses a topic near and dear, namely that bonds continue to not buy the equity rally, and that the market is really not only stupid and inefficient, but wrong and overshooting most of the time. The only question is for how long can it remain wrong. And courtesy of the Fed, the answer is long, long, long. Not surprisingly David ridicules the constant lack of volume to the upside, and concludes that the rally should be faded, and that "this market is completely unprepared for 500k claims and sub-50 ISM." Obviously, he expects both to occur shortly (and just in time for Shiller to say he believes the chance of a double dip is more than 50%).

MARKET COMMENT … WE’RE ALL CHARTISTS NOW

We’re 142 trading days into the year – 52 days (37%) have seen 1% or greater moves. And the S&P 500 is now flat as a beaver’s tail on the year. I call this the meat-grinder market. Again, a huge rally into yesterday’s close – and now the S&P 500 is sitting right at the 200-day moving average. This is starting to get interesting. Again, the lack of ratification from Mr. Bond as the 10-year note yield came back and closed the day a smidgen below 3%.

Today is a critical day. The interim peaks since the April 23rd peak have been progressively lower but a three-point rally in the S&P 500 today would break that pattern:

April 23rd: 1217.3

May 12th: 1171.7

June 18th: 1117.5

July 26th: 1115.0

We should add that we are at a new post-April high in the Dow and the NYSE (the latter is not yet at the 200-day m.a.). We’re not there yet on the S&P 500 or the Nasdaq (13 points off) but we are getting close. While everyone is fixated on the 200-day moving average, we add…
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DISAPPOINTING, DEFLATIONARY, DOUBLE DIP?

DISAPPOINTING, DEFLATIONARY, DOUBLE DIP?

Courtesy of The Pragmatic Capitalist 

By Annaly Capital Management:

There was a heavy economic data schedule in the back half of this week.

On Thursday we got Industrial Production (IP) and Capacity Utilization (Cap-U) for June, along with Philly Fed Business Conditions and Empire State manufacturing surveys for July. The Empire State survey dropped to around 5 from near 20 in June, and Philly Fed dropped to 5.1 from 8, both of these well below expectations. Although IP and Cap-U have been steadily improving during the prior year, both stalled in June. Given the correlation between IP and the Philly Fed survey, shown below with Industrial Production lagged 6 months, we expect headwinds for the manufacturing-led recovery in coming months.

ann3 DISAPPOINTING, DEFLATIONARY, DOUBLE DIP?

It’s hard to imagine another plunge in Industrial Production like the one in 2008. Production is already back to levels first seen in 2000, a full decade with no advance in production, and inventories have already gone through the correction process (as evidenced by the sales/inventory ratio). But it seems obvious that recent growth rates are unsustainable, particularly in the absence of a real pickup in final sales.

This morning, consumer price data was released. The Consumer Price Index is rolling over, falling for 3 months in a row, and is now at roughly the same level as it was two years ago. The year-over-year growth rate looks to be heading back towards zero.

ann2 DISAPPOINTING, DEFLATIONARY, DOUBLE DIP?

Maybe the 10yr at 3% isn’t so rich after all.

Friday morning also brought fresh weekly ECRI leading index data. The debate about a “double-dip” recession has been deafening, but according to this index, we seem to already be in back-to-back recessions that are worse than the 1980/1982 experience.

ann1 DISAPPOINTING, DEFLATIONARY, DOUBLE DIP?

(ECRI Weekly Leading Indicator)

The ECRI data series only includes just over 40 years of data, the blink of an economic eye, but the recent behavior of this leading index is disconcerting.

We’re still early in earnings season, but several big banks reported earnings before the market open on Friday. Citigroup posted earnings of $2.7 billion (which contained $1.5 billion of loan loss reserve release, and around a $1 billion of positive asset markups) and Bank of America came in at $3.1 billion (including about a $1.1 billion pretax gain from asset sales, a $1.2 billion pretax gain related to Merrill Lynch structured notes, and…
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Depression III, Double Dip Recession, Cooling or Slowing Economy?

Depression III, Double Dip Recession, Cooling or Slowing Economy?

Courtesy of Ron Rutherford

The Institute of Supply Management (ISM) has again graced us with another two reports on the Manufacturing and Non-Manufacturing ISM Report On Business®. In this and other posts on the ISM, we wish to delve deeper into the raw numbers and get a better degree of understanding of the underlying currents in the macro-economy.   Along the way let us also look at other voices and opinions of the macro-view.

Headline Numbers of ISM Report On Business®.

The PMI index {manufacturing index} was reported as 56.2% and NMI (non-manufacturing index/composite index) was reported as 53.8%.   Both numbers missed Market Watch’s Economic Calendar consensus numbers with ISM Manufacturing consensus at 59% and Non-Manufacturing at 55.3%.   Econoday reports ISM Mfg Index as 59 consensus and the range as 57.6 to 59.7 and ISM Non-Mfg Index as 55 consensus and the range as 53.5 to 56 which indicates that only non-manufacturing fell within the range of consensus.

Both reports are remarkably similar in that the composite chart is marked most prominently in “Slower” under the rate of change. The indexes and indicators are mostly growing but are growing at a slower pace.   Considering the number of months of trending growth especially in the manufacturing report, this slow-down could just be head winds slowing progress or just a small hill that will easily reverse and accelerate the growth in future months.   I am just not certain that the slow-down is worth wringing hands over, but could easily frighten the equity markets as they appear to have done prior to this past week.   Econoday notes the possible reaction from markets.

Today’s report is not good news for the stock market which may continue to discount economic slowing for the months ahead.   Today’s report will also increase talk that new rounds of government stimulus may be in order.

Not sure another stimulus is a prudent move at least at this time. I also want to quote from both reports on the recent cooling episode.

Peak growth may have already come and gone, a worry of the global markets and indicated by the ISM’s June report on non-manufacturing.

The acceleration in manufacturing cooled but only slightly in June, according to the Institute for Supply Management’s composite index which slowed to 56.2 from May’s


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US Economy: That’s How I Roll…Over

US Economy: That’s How I Roll…Over

Courtesy of Joshua M Brown, The Reformed Broker 

Although the data doesn’t necessarily indicate that a double dip is here (just a slowing of the expansion so far), there is no doubt that mentally, we’re collectively urging it on.

Stocks suck, commodities have all been schmeissed (even gold last week), housing is going through another leg down (yanking the $8,000 tax credit sure didn’t help), the bond market is screaming (under 3% yield on the ten year!) and everyone is getting themselves liquid again.

While I understand that it’s only natural, at least historically, for the expansion to cool off from the initial rip-roaring pace, it is impossible to ignore how pathetically quickly we’ve lost what little momentum our trillions of dollars have gotten us.

Zero percent interest rates forever, tax credits for cars and homes, infrastructure spending, stimulus after stimulus – and it’s starting to feel like we fired a cap gun at a charging elephant.

Here’s some reading on the latest in Double Dip-ology.  Hopefully they’re wrong, but the stock market doesn’t seem to think they are…

Barton Biggs Cuts Stock Portfolio in Half  (BusinessWeek)

Double Dip Search Trends (Calculated Risk)

Karl Denninger’s Half-Year Checkup (Market-Ticker)

The ECRI Points to a Real Slowdown (The Pragmatic Capitalist


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Meredith Whitney Sees Bleak Second Half in Stock Market, Small Business Credit Crunch, Double Dip in Housing

Meredith Whitney Sees Bleak Second Half in Stock Market, Small Business Credit Crunch, Double Dip in Housing, Says European Banks in Worse Shape

meredith whitneyCourtesy of Mish

Meredith Whitney is concerned about financial reform that will punish banks just for the sake of doing something. This she says, will hamper small business lending right at a time state and local cutbacks will cost 1-2 million jobs.

The Wall Street Journal covers this in The Small Business Credit Crunch

Over the next 12 months, disappearing state and local government jobs will prove to be a meaningful headwind to an already fragile economic recovery. This is simply how the math shakes out. Collectively, over 40 states face hundreds of billions of dollars in budget gaps over the next two years, and 49 states are constitutionally required to balance their accounts annually. States will raise taxes, but higher taxes alone will not be enough to make up for the vast shortfall in state budgets. Accordingly, 42 states and the District of Columbia have already articulated plans to cut government jobs.

So the burden on the private sector to create jobs becomes that much more crucial. Just to maintain a steady level of unemployment, the private sector will have to create one million to two million jobs to offset government job losses.

Herein lies the challenge: Small businesses continue to struggle to gain access to credit and cannot hire in this environment.

Unless real focus is afforded to re-engaging small businesses in this country, we will have a tragic and dangerous unemployment level for an extended period of time. Small businesses fund themselves exactly the way consumers do, with credit cards and home equity lines. Over the past two years, more than $1.5 trillion in credit-card lines have been cut, and those cuts are increasing by the day. Due to dramatic declines in home values, home-equity lines as a funding option are effectively off the table. Proposed regulatory reform—specifically interest-rate caps and interchange fees—will merely exacerbate the cycle of credit contraction plaguing small businesses.

If banks are not allowed to effectively price for risk, they will not take the risk. Right now we need banks, and particularly community banks, more than ever to step in and provide liquidity to small businesses. Interest-rate caps and interchange fees will more likely drive consumer credit out of the market and many community banks out


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Housing Headed For Another Leg Down; Stabilization Misunderstood

Housing Headed For Another Leg Down; Stabilization Misunderstood

Courtesy of Mish

New house with for sale sign

With pent-up housing demand headed for exhaustion, if not well past exhaustion already thanks to $10,000 tax credits for new buyers, the housing recovery is about to reverse.

Please consider Reversal of Fortune.

One in five housing markets entered a second leg of home price declines in late 2009, after showing price increases for nearly half of last year, according to a report released Wednesday by Zillow.com, a real-estate Web site.

In 29 of the 143 markets tracked by the site — including Boston, Atlanta and San Diego — prices flattened or began to decrease again in the second part of last year, after five or more months of consecutive monthly increases, according to the site’s fourth quarter real-estate market report.

Home prices in another 29 markets, including Los Angeles and New York, increased each month throughout the fourth quarter. But the rate of increase slowed from November to December in 21 markets, according to the data.

Nationwide, home values fell 5% in the fourth quarter compared with the fourth quarter a year earlier. Values fell 0.5% from the third quarter of 2009.

"While we have seen strong stabilization in home values during 2009, there are clear signs that they will turn more negative in the near-term," said Stan Humphries, Zillow’s chief economist, in a news release.

"What we saw in mid-2009 was a brief respite from a larger market correction that has not yet run its course," he said.

Still, Humphries said markets that see a "double dip" in values before reaching a bottom won’t see a return "to the magnitude of depreciation seen earlier." Instead, the drop will look like a "modest aftershock" of the initial drop in prices. In this scenario, a "double dip" is defined as two periods of sustained declines separated by a brief stabilization or recovery, according to the release.

Stabilization Misunderstood

It’s important not to make too much of stabilization. If you throw enough money at something, prices are bound to stabilize, at least for a while. However, eventually the pool of pent-up demand is exhausted, much like the pool of original fools was exhausted.

Christ raising the


The shadow supply of homes is through the roof, rental prices are dropping, and there is no


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The Double Dippers Are Out In Force This Weekend

The Double Dippers Are Out In Force This Weekend

Posted by Joshua M Brown, The Reformed Broker

Three syringes, close-up

The Double Dippers got a shot of B12 last week right into the puffed out vein in their foreheads.

Even the bulls gotta admit, their case has begun to look better based on this week’s nasty surprise on consumer delinquencies from Capital One ($COF) as well as the continuing jobless claims number.

Charts and Coffee is reminding us that:

  • The IBD 100 has fallen about 3.5% since the beginning of the year and is trading below its 50-day moving average.
  • Half the 100 stocks in the IBD 100 Index are under their 50-day moving averages (as of Friday).

Elsewhere, Morgan Stanley’s Stephen Roach was talking double dip with Marc Faber on CNBC, The Pragmatic Capitalist has the video here.

The most comprehensive summation of the bearish economic case can be found on the Dow Jones Market Talk blog via Paul Vigna‘s discussion about how in the early 30′s, they thought the worst was over too.  Vigna quotes a recent McKinsey piece on deleveraging:

“Deleveraging episodes are painful, lasting six to seven years on average and reducing the ratio of debt to GDP by 25 percent.  GDP typically contracts during the first several years and then recovers. If history is a guide, many years of debt reduction are expected in specific sectors of some of the world’s largest economies, and this process will exert a significant drag on GDP growth.”

We’ll see if tomorrow is another Merger/ Mutual Fund Monday or if there will be a continuation of last week’s 400 point Dow sell-off.

Oh yeah, I should mention that the Bank of China just got clearance for a 20% secondary sale of common stock, equating to roughly $30 billion worth at today’s valuations. CORRECTED: 40 Billion Yuan worth (roughly $6 billion USD) – thx to Patty Edwards.  Yuck.

 


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Phil's Favorites

What scientists are doing to develop a vaccine for the new coronavirus

 

What scientists are doing to develop a vaccine for the new coronavirus

It is critical to learn more about SARS-CoV-2, including its source and why transmission appears to be more efficient than with previous coronaviruses. (Shutterstock)

Courtesy of Marc-Antoine De La Vega, Université Laval

With an increasing number of confirmed cases in China and 24 other countries, the COVID-19 epidemic caused by the novel coronavirus (now known as SARS-CoV-2) looks concerning to many. As of Feb. 19, the latest numbers listed 74,280 confirmed cases including 2,006 deaths. Four of these de...



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Biotech & Health

What scientists are doing to develop a vaccine for the new coronavirus

 

What scientists are doing to develop a vaccine for the new coronavirus

It is critical to learn more about SARS-CoV-2, including its source and why transmission appears to be more efficient than with previous coronaviruses. (Shutterstock)

Courtesy of Marc-Antoine De La Vega, Université Laval

With an increasing number of confirmed cases in China and 24 other countries, the COVID-19 epidemic caused by the novel coronavirus (now known as SARS-CoV-2) looks concerning to many. As of Feb. 19, the latest numbers listed 74,280 confirmed cases including 2,006 deaths. Four of these de...



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Members' Corner

Why do people believe con artists?

 

Why do people believe con artists?

Would you buy medicine from this man? Carol M. Highsmith/Wikimedia Commons

Courtesy of Barry M. Mitnick, University of Pittsburgh

What is real can seem pretty arbitrary. It’s easy to be fooled by misinformation disguised as news and deepfake videos showing people doing things they never did or said. Inaccurate information – even deliberately wrong informatio...



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Zero Hedge

Easily Overlooked Issues Regarding COVID-19

Courtesy of ZeroHedge View original post here.

Authored by Gail Tverberg via Our Finite World,

We read a lot in the news about the new Wuhan coronavirus and the illness it causes (COVID-19), but some important points often get left out.

[1] COVID-19 is incredibly contagious.

COVID-19 transmits extremely easily from person to person. Interpersonal contact doesn’t need to be...



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The Technical Traders

Gold Rallies As Fear Take Center Stage

Courtesy of Technical Traders

Gold has rallied extensively from the lows near $1560 over the past 2 weeks.  At first, this rally didn’t catch too much attention with traders, but now the rally has reached new highs above $1613 and may attempt a move above $1750 as metals continue to reflect the fear in the global markets.

We’ve been warning our friends and followers of the real potential in precious metals for many months – actually since early 2018.  Our predictive modeling system suggests Gold will rally above $1650 very quickly, then possibly stall a bit before continuing higher to target the $1750 range.

The one thing all skilled traders must consider is the longer-term fear that is build...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

Precious Metals Eyeing Breakout Despite US Dollar Strength

Courtesy of Chris Kimble

Gold and silver prices have been on the rise in early 2020 as investors turn to precious metals as geopolitical concerns and news of coronavirus hit the airwaves.

The rally in gold has been impressive, with prices surging past $1600 this week (note silver is nearing $18.50).

What’s been particularly impressive about the Gold rally is that it has unfolded despite strength in the US Dollar.

In today’s chart, we look at the ratio of Gold to the US Dollar Index. As you can see, this ratio has traded in a rising channel over the past 4 years.

The Gold/US Dollar ratio is currently attempting a breakout of this rising channel at (1).

This would come on further ...



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Insider Scoop

68 Stocks Moving In Friday's Mid-Day Session

Courtesy of Benzinga

Gainers
  • Trans World Entertainment Corporation (NASDAQ: TWMC) shares climbed 120.5% to $7.72 after the company disclosed that its subsidiary etailz entered into a deal with Encina for $25 million 3-year secured revolving credit facility.
  • Celldex Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ: CLDX) fell 39.8% to $3.1744. Cantor Fitzgerald initiated coverage on Celldex Therapeutics with an Overweight rating and a $8 price target.
  • TSR, Inc. (NASDAQ: TSRI) gained 36.2% to $8.17.
  • ...


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Digital Currencies

Altcoin season 2.0: why bitcoin has been outgunned by crypto rivals since new year

 

Altcoin season 2.0: why bitcoin has been outgunned by crypto rivals since new year

‘We have you surrounded!’ Wit Olszewski

Courtesy of Gavin Brown, Manchester Metropolitan University and Richard Whittle, Manchester Metropolitan University

When bitcoin was trading at the dizzying heights of almost US$2...



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ValueWalk

What US companies are saying about coronavirus impact

By Aman Jain. Originally published at ValueWalk.

With the coronavirus outbreak coinciding with the U.S. earnings seasons, it is only normal to expect companies to talk about this deadly virus in their earnings conference calls. In fact, many major U.S. companies not only talked about coronavirus, but also warned about its potential impact on their financial numbers.

Q4 2019 hedge fund letters, conferences and more

Coronavirus impact: many US companies unclear

According to ...



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Chart School

RTT browsing latest..

Courtesy of Read the Ticker

Please review a collection of WWW browsing results. The information here is delayed by a few months, members get the most recent content.



Date Found: Tuesday, 01 October 2019, 02:18:22 AM

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Comment: Wall of worry, or cliff of despair!



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Comment: Interesting.. Hitler good for the German DAX when he was winning! They believed .. until th...



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Lee's Free Thinking

Why Blaming the Repo Market is Like Blaming the Australian Bush Fires

 

Why Blaming the Repo Market is Like Blaming the Australian Bush Fires

Courtesy of  

The repo market problem isn’t the problem. It’s a sideshow, a diversion, and a joke. It’s a symptom of the problem.

Today, I got a note from Liquidity Trader subscriber David, a professional investor, and it got me to thinking. Here’s what David wrote:

Lee,

The ‘experts’ I hear from keep saying that once 300B more in reserves have ...



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Mapping The Market

How IPOs Are Priced

Via Jean Luc 

Funny but probably true:

...

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Free eBook - "My Top Strategies for 2017"

 

 

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Phil has a chapter in a newly-released eBook that we think you’ll enjoy.

In My Top Strategies for 2017, Phil's chapter is Secret Santa’s Inflation Hedges for 2017.

This chapter isn’t about risk or leverage. Phil present a few smart, practical ideas you can use as a hedge against inflation as well as hedging strategies designed to assist you in staying ahead of the markets.

Some other great content in this free eBook includes:

 

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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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