Posts Tagged ‘Greenspan’

Options and My Patience Expire Today

Well now we're officially cashed out!

As I always do before options expiration I reviewed our Buy List, which, this quarter, is a list of 37 stocks we've been playing since late December and, sadly, after reviewing 37 of our favorite investments very carefully this week – I could only conclude that cashing them out was the only decision I could be comfortable with this week.  Of 66 trades we had on our 37 stocks, 64 are winners with an average return since 2/8 of 28% – since most of the trades were designed to make 40% for the year – it just seems silly not to take the money and run now, on March 19th.

You are not supposed to have 64 out of 66 winners in 6 weeks, you are not supposed to make 3/4 of what you anticipate for the year in 6 weeks – that is NOT how the markets are supposed to work!  When the markets go against you in some ridiculous "black swan" fashion, it is easy to throw up your hands and walks away but when the markets go in your favor in some ridiculous, "white swan" fashion – maybe it's also a good idea to use those same hands to stuff your pockets with cash and walk away.

There's nothing wrong with cash – the Fed tells us there will be no inflation in the foreseeable future and, in fact, they are fighting deflation so our sideline dollars will gain more and more buying power while we wait.  Actually, despite my best efforts, there are still 15 positions that weren't worth getting rid of (too much reward, not enough risk), even in a worrying market.  Generally they are positions we expect to get at least another 20% from by January – still a pretty good return in this low-VIX market. 

Our plan is to take opportunistic trades between now and April earnings – we're still expecting a pullback and I'd be very motivated to go back into our old friends if they go back on sale but most of those picks were made for a defensive market posture that won't be necessary if we break over our levels from here and they certainly weren't worth riding back down after hitting 75% of our goal in 25% of the year! …
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Boggling

Boggling

Courtesy of TraderMark at Fund My Mutual Fund 

Seriously? Sleepy mega caps that now move like Chinese small caps?  These 2??

 



Truly we are in the Twilight Zone market.  Somewhere Alan Greenspan must be so proud of his disciple.

 


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A BUBBLE IN SEARCH OF A PIN

A BUBBLE IN SEARCH OF A PIN

Businessman with bubble gum bubble about to be popped

A Bubble in Search of a Pin
Unemployment Numbers: A Mixed Bag
A Bubble in Search of a Pin
And Speaking of Bubbles
Help in Europe, California, Tampa, and Becoming our Parents

Should Greenspan and Bernanke have seen the bubble in housing and other assets and acted, or should we accept their defense that you can’t know whether there is a bubble until after the fact? We will look at research that suggests they should have known, and, at the least, policy makers should no longer be allowed to say, “How could I have known?”

Of course, the employment numbers came out this morning, and the results are mixed; but that is better than they have been for the past two years. We dig into the numbers to see what they are really saying. And finally, we examine why the markets are so volatile. Is it just Greece, or is there more? There’s a lot of very interesting, and important, material to cover.

But first, and quickly, as I wrote in Outside the Box a few weeks ago, I am starting to very selectively buy biotech stocks, and mostly, though not exclusively, companies associated with the regenerative genetic revolution that is coming our way. I am convinced that this is going to be a decade of the most amazing medical breakthroughs, which will literally change (and in many cases extend) our lives, as therapies to treat all sorts of diseases become available.

This is the last time I am going to mention it, but here is the link to that OTB, which analyzes why we may see a bubble in biotech stocks before the end of the decade. The OTB was written by my friend Pat Cox, who covers these stocks and other technological marvels in his newsletter, Breakthrough Technology Alert. I have been following Pat for some time now, have talked extensively with him, and think he is one of those guys who have a handle on what by all accounts is going to be an amazing decade of breakthroughs.

I have asked his publisher to offer my readers a very discounted subscription price for one more week. (Ignore the deadline of February…
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Manic Monday – Dubai, CitiGroup and GS Move Markets

What a morning it's been already! 

Last night, at about 11:30 EST, Abu Dhabi gave a $10Bn bailout to Dubai (until the end of April, anyway) with the following statement from Sheik Ahmed bin Saaed Al Maktoum, chairman of the Dubai Supreme Fiscal Committee: "We are here today to reassure investors, financial and trade creditors, employees, and our citizens that our government will act at all times in accordance with market principles and internationally accepted business practices."  That was enough to send the Hang Seng from down 300 points to up 300 points in less than 30 minutes of trading (on both sides of their lunch break) while the Shanghai went from -2.2% to +1.7% and the Nikkei also reversed a 100-point drop, but only managed to get back to even at the close

US futures trading also went wild, up over 100 points at the time but we've given up about half of those gains as of 7:30.  Does it make sense that the Dubai crisis, which dropped us from 10,450 back to 10,250 when it came up, should be the catalyst to get us over 10,500 just because they were bailed out?  Of course it doesn't – that's why we went to cash.  This is one of the most ridiculously irrational markets I've ever seen.  The other "good" news this morning is also the same old songs:  Citigroup will repay their $20Bn TARP loan by diluting their stock by about 20% and GS says oil will go to $85 early next year.   

I don't know why they even bother to pretend anymore – they should just put 10 market-boosting statements on a chip that randomly plays one of them whenever the MSM needs a quote for the morning.  People don't seem to notice it's the same thing over and over and over again so why even bother with the pretense?  Speaking of pretense – I mentioned in the Weekend Wrap-Up that we expected this nonsense this morning but, had I realized that Greenspan AND Cramer were going to be on Meet the Press yesterday, I would have gone more bullish as those are the two biggest market hypers GE could have used for this week's quotes.

 

Europe seems happy enough with Asia's recovery and all the bull*** commentary (that's bullISH – what were you thinking?)…
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Fed Sponsored Feedback Loops and the Fed Uncertainty Principle Revisited

I have a feeling Mish’s "Outrage List" is going to be getting a lot longer before it gets shorter. – Ilene

Fed Sponsored Feedback Loops and the Fed Uncertainty Principle Revisited

Razor wire

Courtesy of Mish

Caroline Baum has an interesting discussion of feedback loops and Fed policy on October 19 in Bernanke Frets Over Sherlock Holmes’s Next Stop.

Federal Reserve policy makers like to explain the world in terms of feedback loops, except those of their own making.

Last year, a negative feedback loop threatened to deepen the financial crisis as a weak economy and a teetering banking system led to layoffs and production cutbacks, which led to even bigger declines in output and employment.

Last month, officials heralded the onset of a “positive feedback loop,” wherein better financial conditions and stronger growth in employment and output lead to a stronger stock market and improved financial conditions, according to minutes from the Fed’s Sept. 22-23 meeting.

At some point, of course, the loop gets broken. Otherwise, the economy would head in one direction, up or down, forever.

Where is the discussion of the Fed’s inflation expectations feedback loop, which yields no feedback and less information?

Expectations Loop-de-Loop

If I have this right, we’re waiting for the Fed to do or say something to help us decide whether we should hoard cash (because we expect the dollar to buy more tomorrow if prices are falling) or buy and hoard hard goods (if we expect inflation to diminish the dollar’s purchasing power).

The Fed, in turn, is waiting for us to do something so it can decide what to do: either raise the volume on its anti- inflation rhetoric with talk of exit strategies and price stability; or talk softly to allay fears of premature rate increases to keep market rates from rising.

If I read the minutes and other Fed communications correctly, policy makers are relying on us to tell them what to do, we’re relying on them for direction, and we’re locked in this no-way-out feedback loop that provides no useful information for either party.

To say that you and I have the ability to create inflation on our own flies in the face of monetary theory. If we did have a set of keys to the printing press, the Fed would have more


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Ron Paul: Here Comes the BIG ONE

Ron Paul: Here Comes the BIG ONE

Courtesy of John Rubino at Dollar Collapse

end the fedRon Paul has a bestseller. That sounds so nice I’ll say it twice. Ron Paul has a bestseller. His new book, End the Fed, is number 30 on Amazon as this is written — with 167 mostly glowing reviews — and his reception last week on Jon Stewart’s Daily Show was hugely positive. Stewart, more-or-less a left/libertarian, clearly sees Paul as one of the good guys, and his audience seems to agree.

With all these doors suddenly slamming open, it’s easy to forget that just a couple of years ago Ron Paul was an obscure, eccentric Texas congressman whose presidential run was met with a yawn in the mainstream media. But when he stood up in the debates and made the case for limited government, sound money, and adherence to the Constitution, he struck a chord. It was clear (to libertarians at least) that he was telling the truth and that the political hacks who were treating him like a deranged uncle were the ones with the vision/character problem.

Paul didn’t win many votes (though out here in Idaho he did get 24% in the Republican primary) but he made an impression. And when pretty much everything he warned us about came true -- while virtually everything the hacks of both parties said turned out to be disastrously wrong — he even gained a bit of mainstream cred. So when he introduced HR 1207 to audit the Fed, the response was at first respectful, and then enthusiastic. Instead of instantly dismissing him, people began asking their representatives why the Fed isn’t already audited. This law might just pass, with unpredictable but almost certainly amusing results.

But of course auditing the Fed is just the beginning. Paul’s ultimate goal is to eliminate the whole institution, along with other golems like fiat currency and fractional reserve banking, and to reinstitute sound, honest money and limited government.

For those new to this subject, End the Fed is a clearly written primer on how dangerous delusions like unsound money and expanding government have gradually become the unquestioned conventional wisdom. For more seasoned gold bugs the book provides some interesting history, along with plenty of useful debate ammunition. 

Some of the high points:

• Paul makes it clear that the Fed isn’t the whole problem. It’s just one part of a system that first…
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SPECIAL END OF CIVILIZATION ISSUE

SPECIAL END OF CIVILIZATION ISSUE

civilization

Courtesy of The Mad Hedge Fund Trader

Featured Trades: (OBAMA), (BERNANKE), (TBT), (PCY)

1) Boy, are the Republicans really screwed. I was awed with Obama’s performance on the David Letterman show last night. This guy is relaxed, polished, cool, and a fabulous advocate and salesman of his policies. When asked a question, he is so focused you feel like he is burning holes straight into his interviewer with his laser eyes. Obama has never really stopped campaigning, with five talk show appearances on Sunday, constant reminders about the mess he inherited, and relentless attacks against the right. His online network is still operating with full force. I have noticed that the spending of the government stimulus package is being carefully metered out to create an economic miracle by 2012. What can the Republicans offer? Reigned in government spending? They just doubled that national debt from $5 to $10 trillion. Regulatory reform? The financial system blew itself up on their watch. The environment? Bush came into office arguing that global warming was a myth. A better life? Most Americans have either just lost everything, or saw their net worth drop by half.

The big problem for the GOP is they took their own moderates out and shot them. Moderate ideas and input might get a hearing in this environment. The end result is that the lunatic fringe has taken over the party, like Sarah Palin and Rush Limbaugh. Death panels? No one rational and substantial wants to step up and become the sacrificial lamb, the blame taker. This in fact could be the beginning of a 20 year reign for the Dems, much like Roosevelt brought on from 1932-1952, on the heels of Herbert Hoover’s great stock market crash. The Republicans could be in the wilderness for a really long time. Better structure your portfolio for the one party state before elephants become an endangered species. Think endless trillion dollar budget deficits, a weak dollar, continued massive debt issuance, ultra low interest rates as far as the eye can see, and strong commodity, energy, gold, and silver prices. I’m not trying to be partisan here. I’m just trying to call them as I see them.
 

NationalDebt1.gif picture by madhedge

 

2) I spent the evening with David Wessel, the Wall Street Journal economics editor, who has just published In Fed We Trust:…
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Assessing the Odds of a Double Dip Recession

Assessing the Odds of a Double Dip Recession

recessionCourtesy of Mish

If you have a job and it is not in jeopardy, pull out the party hats and toot your horns. The OECD calls an end to the global recession.

The global downturn was effectively declared over yesterday, with the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) revealing that "clear signs of recovery are now visible" in all seven of the leading Western economies, as well as in each of the key "Bric" nations.

The OECD’s composite leading indicators suggest that activity is now improving in all of the world’s most significant 11 economies – the leading seven, consisting of the US, UK, Germany, Italy, France, Canada and Japan, and the Bric nations of Brazil, Russia, India and China – and in almost every case at a faster pace than previously.

Each of the 11 economies saw an improvement in July, the OECD said, with only France improving at a slower rate than in June. The July figures are the most encouraging since the indices began ticking downwards during the first quarter of last year.

The OECD’s leading indicators are considered a key economic yardstick because they measure the sectors of countries’ economies that tend to react first to upswings and downturns. As such they provide early evidence of the way in which the overall economy is progressing.

Unemployment Likely To Rise For A Year

If you don’t have a job or your job is in jeopardy you may not feel like partying much. Unemployment is likely to rise for another year.

Moreover, there are strong reasons to expect Structurally High Unemployment For A Decade.

In the Incredible Shrinking Boomer Economy I noted a harsh reality quote of Bernanke:

"It takes GDP growth of about 2.5 percent to keep the jobless rate constant. But the Fed expects growth of only about 1 percent in the last six months of the year. So that’s not enough to bring down the unemployment rate."

Pray tell what happens if GDP can’t exceed 2.5% for a couple of years? What about a decade (or on and off for a decade)?

If you have come to the conclusion that we are going to have structurally high unemployment for a decade, you have come to the right conclusion. Ask yourself: Is that what the stock


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Tim on Economists

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By Tim Naegele, in response to Ryan Grim’s Priceless: How The Federal Reserve Bought The Economics Profession.financial bubble

My sense — having gotten my undergraduate degree in the field from UCLA — is that most economists are incompetent "whores."  There is a herd instinct that governs them, and they do not dare to get out of step with their brethren; and they tow the "company line" religiously.  Hence, at best some of them are moderately competent in deciphering the past, but utterly incompetent in predicting the future.  Rather than be perceived as "wrong," they are like lemmings marching to the sea, in lock step.

That is among the reasons why when one economist with credentials breaks from the pack — as Roubini did before the so-called "recession" was upon us, and says that the emperor has no clothes — he (or she) has such an impact, because the other members of his profession are essentially saying nothing.  In a real sense, the profession’s "poster boy" is Alan Greenspan who has admitted that he never saw the housing crisis coming.  What planet was he living on? 

Ordinary Americans saw the bubble — and all bubbles burst at some point in time, and the bigger the bubble, the deeper the fall — but Greenspan and his brethren missed it.  That speaks volumes.

 


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Greenspan “Market Crisis Will Happen Again”

Greenspan "Market Crisis Will Happen Again"

Courtesy of Mish

Former Fed Chairman Alan Greenspan says Market crisis ‘will happen again’

"The crisis will happen again but it will be different," he told BBC Two’s The Love of Money series. He added that he had predicted the crash would come as a reaction to a long period of prosperity.

"They [financial crises] are all different, but they have one fundamental source," he said. "That is the unquenchable capability of human beings when confronted with long periods of prosperity to presume that it will continue."

While I agree that the next crisis will be different, the rest of what Greenspan said is nonsense. Crashes do not happen because of prosperity. Crashes happen because the Fed and people like Greenspan do not understand the difference between prosperity and a crack-up boom.

It’s easy to see that Greenspan is attempting to absolve himself of blame for the crisis. That ploy does not work.

The reason the next crisis will be different is everyone from the Fed, to Congress, Obama, the Treasury, and central bankers in general are all acting to prevent the last crisis. It’s too late for that.

Mr Greenspan, who when he ran the US central bank was hailed as a man who could move markets, also warned that the world’s financial institutions should have seen the looming crisis.

"The bankers knew that they were involved in an under-pricing of risk and that at some point a correction would be made," he said.

What a hoot. Greenspan said it was impossible to see a bubble until after it burst, did not see the housing bubble coming at all, and indeed purposely held interest rates too low too long in response to the last recession, now says the financial institutions should have seen this coming.

This is hypocrisy at its finest.

He also warned that Britain, with its globally-focused economy, would be harder hit than the US by the current recession and collapse in world trade.

"Obviously we’ve both suffered very considerably but … Britain is more globally oriented as an economy and the dramatic decline in exports globally and trade generally following the collapse of Lehman Brothers had dramatic effects in the financial system of Britain," Mr Greenspan said.

"It’s going to take a long while for you [Britain] to work your


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Phil's Favorites

How Does the Stock Market Bottom?

 

How Does the Stock Market Bottom?

Courtesy of 

Despite the recent selloff, things are still relatively fine. I know nobody wants to hear this right now, but the S&P 500 is still up double digits over the last year and 36% over the last three years. What has people shook, understandably, is the speed of this decline.

Depending on where stocks close today, we could be looking at a 10% haircut in just five sessions. Over the last 20 years, this only happened during the Yuan devaluation in 2015, the Eurozone crisis in 2011, the GFC (global financial crisis) in ’08 and ’09, and the dotcom bubble in ’00, &rsqu...



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Zero Hedge

NYSE Announces Disaster-Recovery Test Due To Virus Fears

Courtesy of ZeroHedge View original post here.

In a somewhat shocking sounding move, given administration officials' ongoing effort to calm the public fears over the spread of Covid-19, The New York Stock Exchange has announced it will commence disaster-recovery testing in its Cermak Data Center on March 7 amid coronavirus concern, Fox Business reports in a tweet, citing the exchange.

During this test, NYSE will facilitate electronic Core Open and Closing Auctions as if the 11 Wall Stree...



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ValueWalk

Cities With The Most 'New' And Tenured Homeowners

By Jacob Wolinsky. Originally published at ValueWalk.

Homeownership is a major investment. Not just financially, but when a person or family purchases a home, they’re investing years – if not decades – in that particular community. 55places wanted to find out which real estate markets are luring in new homebuyers, and which ones are dominated by owners that haven’t moved in decades. The study analyzed residency data in more than 300 US cities and revealed the top 10 cities with the most tenured homeowners – residents who’ve lived in and owned their home for more than 30 years – are sprinkled across ...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

Financial Crisis Deja Vu: Home Construction Index Double Top?

Courtesy of Chris Kimble

Most of us remember the 2007-2009 financial crisis because of the collapse in home prices and its effect on the economy.

One key sector that tipped off that crisis was the home builders.

The home builders are an integral piece to our economy and often signal “all clears” or “short-term warnings” to investors based on their economic health and how the index trades.

In today’s chart, we highlight the Dow Jones Home Construction Index. It has climbed all the way back to its pre-crisis highs… BUT it immediately reversed lower from there.

This raises concerns about a double top.

This pr...



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Insider Scoop

A Peek Into The Markets: US Stock Futures Plunge Amid Coronavirus Fears

Courtesy of Benzinga

Pre-open movers

U.S. stock futures traded lower in early pre-market trade. South Korea confirmed 256 new coronavirus cases on Thursday, while China reported an additional 327 new cases. Data on U.S. international trade in goods for January, wholesale inventories for January and consumer spending for January will be released at 8:30 a.m. ET. The Chicago PMI for February is scheduled for release at 9:45 a.m. ET, while the University of Michigan's consumer sentime...



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Biotech & Health

Could coronavirus really trigger a recession?

 

Could coronavirus really trigger a recession?

Coronavirus seems to be on a collision course with the US economy and its 12-year bull market. AP Photo/Ng Han Guan

Courtesy of Michael Walden, North Carolina State University

Fears are growing that the new coronavirus will infect the U.S. economy.

A major U.S. stock market index posted its biggest two-day drop on record, erasing all the gains from the previous two months; ...



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The Technical Traders

SPY Breaks Below Fibonacci Bearish Trigger Level

Courtesy of Technical Traders

Our research team wanted to share this chart with our friends and followers.  This dramatic breakdown in price over the past 4+ days has resulted in a very clear bearish trigger which was confirmed by our Adaptive Fibonacci Price Modeling system.  We believe this downside move will target the $251 level on the SPY over the next few weeks and months.

Some recent headline articles worth reading:

On January 23, 2020, we ...



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Promotions

Free, Live Webinar on Stocks, Options and Trading Strategies

TODAY's LIVE webinar on stocks, options and trading strategy is open to all!

Feb. 26, 1pm EST

Click HERE to join the PSW weekly webinar at 1 pm EST.

Phil will discuss positions, COVID-19, market volatility -- the selloff -- and more! 

This week, we also have a special presentation from Mike Anton of TradeExchange.com. It's a new service that we're excited to be a part of! 

Mike will show off the TradeExchange's new platform which you can try for free.  

...

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Chart School

Oil cycle leads the stock cycle

Courtesy of Read the Ticker

Sure correlation is not causation, but this chart should be known by you.

We all know the world economy was waiting for a pin to prick the 'everything bubble', but no one had any idea of what the pin would look like.

Hence this is why the story of the black swan is so relevant.






There is massive debt behind the record high stock markets, there so much debt the political will required to allow central banks to print trillions to cover losses will likely effect elections. The point is printing money to cover billions is unlikely to upset anyone, however printing trillions will. In 2007 it was billions, in 202X it ...

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Members' Corner

Threats to democracy: oligarchy, feudalism, dictatorship

 

Threats to democracy: oligarchy, feudalism, dictatorship

Courtesy of David Brin, Contrary Brin Blog 

Fascinating and important to consider, since it is probably one of the reasons why the world aristocracy is pulling its all-out putsch right now… “Trillions will be inherited over the coming decades, further widening the wealth gap,” reports the Los Angeles Times. The beneficiaries aren’t all that young themselves. From 1989 to 2016, U.S. households inherited more than $8.5 trillion. Over that time, the average age of recipients rose by a decade to 51. More ...



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Digital Currencies

Altcoin season 2.0: why bitcoin has been outgunned by crypto rivals since new year

 

Altcoin season 2.0: why bitcoin has been outgunned by crypto rivals since new year

‘We have you surrounded!’ Wit Olszewski

Courtesy of Gavin Brown, Manchester Metropolitan University and Richard Whittle, Manchester Metropolitan University

When bitcoin was trading at the dizzying heights of almost US$2...



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Lee's Free Thinking

Why Blaming the Repo Market is Like Blaming the Australian Bush Fires

 

Why Blaming the Repo Market is Like Blaming the Australian Bush Fires

Courtesy of  

The repo market problem isn’t the problem. It’s a sideshow, a diversion, and a joke. It’s a symptom of the problem.

Today, I got a note from Liquidity Trader subscriber David, a professional investor, and it got me to thinking. Here’s what David wrote:

Lee,

The ‘experts’ I hear from keep saying that once 300B more in reserves have ...



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Mapping The Market

How IPOs Are Priced

Via Jean Luc 

Funny but probably true:

...

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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.