Posts Tagged ‘IPO’

Fabulous Friday – Our AliBaba Play Pays off Big!

We're already up over 100% on Alibaba.

How, you may wonder?  Well, two ways:  Back in October of 2007, before Alibaba IPO'd in China, I was touting the company when it had an $8Bn valuation ($1.10 per  share – pre-split).  I was the first and only analyst in the US to point out the benefits of Yahoo's investment back then and our Members who play the Asian markets were able to take advantage of that and today should be the culmination of the white whale of investing – the 20-bagger as Alibaba is expected to IPO in the US at $160Bn just 7 years later

YHOO, on the other hand, took the long and winding road but it should finally be getting to our $50 target and that's another 100% gain on the stock – though a very small consolation to those who didn't pick up AliBaba directly.  Fortunately, at Philstockworld, we know how to BE THE HOUSE – Not the Gambler and, back in June, when the rumors of the AliBaba IPO began we came up with a way for our Members to make 400% playing YHOO into the AliBaba IPO.  

From our Live Member Chat Room:

YHOO/Albo – Why not just buy YHOO?  YHOO is $35Bn and owns 22% of AliB while SFTBY is $91Bn and owns 33% of AliB, so you get a lot more bang for your buck with YHOO, whose forward p/e is only 19, than SFTBY, whose forward p/e is about 17 – so not all that significant.  Of course, more significantly is the potential impact of (guessing) $50Bn worth of AliB on a $35Bn company!  

So we don't even have to go crazy if we want to play the "YHOO is undervalued" game.  The Jan $38/45 bull call spread is $1.60 on the $8 spread with 400% upside if YHOO gains 28%.  I think that's worth $800 for 5 shares in the $25KP


continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,




Even Though GM Lied and Said They Paid Us Back, They Say They’ll Need More Time to Pay Us Back

Even Though GM Lied and Said They Paid Us Back, They Say They’ll Need More Time to Pay Us Back

Courtesy of Jr. Deputy Accountant 

Wait a second… didn’t GM already claim to pay us back in slick commercials earlier this year or am I completely confused? If I’m not, GM said they paid us back but left out that A) they were using government money to do so and B) only paid back the part that was actually "loaned" and didn’t include the full $49.5 billion extended to GM should they need it. They argue that not needing it and instead using that money to pay back the government shows the company is in good shape but I argue that it only shows that our government is the worst loan sharking operation in history. It’s like taking out a payday loan to pay off the interest on the last payday loan except in the case of GM they get a way better interest rate than the 400% Western Union would charge for a few extra bucks til payday. 

USA Today:

General Motors’ new CEO, Dan Akerson, confirmed Thursday that the government — taxpayers, that is — won’t get back all the money put up to save GM from ruin in the car company’s initial public stock offering, expected as soon as mid-November.

[I]t’ll take a couple of years, at least, for the taxpayers to get back the remaining $43 billion in bail-out money the government invested to save GM from going out of business. It won’t all get paid back in the government’s initial sale of its GM shares later this year, he said, but over time investors will be willing to pay more for the shares and the goverment [sic] can get higher prices as it continues selling its 60.8% ownership of GM.

Treasury gets back the remaining $43 billion of bailout money. GM must be consistently profitable for investors to pay such prices, he acknowledged.

Great bargain for the American taxpayer if you ask me. Just let Bernanke and the HFT robots lube up for some $GM and we might actually see a few pennies back on every dollar.

What a joke.


Tags: , , ,




Can GM Really Call That an “Initial” Public Offering?

Can GM Really Call That an "Initial" Public Offering?

Courtesy of Jr. Deputy Accountant 

Initial would imply they didn’t embarrass themselves by getting kicked off the exchange the first time around.

Reuters:

General Motors Co has completed the paperwork for an initial public offering, and timing of its filing with the U.S. securities regulators rests with the board of the top U.S. automaker, sources familiar with the process said on Monday.

The initial prospectus, expected to be for $100 million, is likely to be filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday, two people said, asking not to be named because the preparations for the IPO are private.

Meanwhile, GM will tell you they have paid back the government in full but that’s not exactly true. They’ve paid back the $6.7 billion they were actually loaned but the total $49.5 billion extended to GM to help it through bankruptcy is still outstanding. A large chunk of that (the part they DON’T mention in the "we paid you back!" commercials) consists of the government’s equity in GM, so GM can turn around and say they paid back the bailout loan and technically be correct. Tricky ain’t it?

It gets worse when you realize they used government money to pay back the government.

Via Reason:

As it turns out, the Obama administration put $13.4 billion of the aid money as "working capital" in an escrow account when the company was in bankruptcy. The company is using this escrow money—government money—to pay back the government loan.

GM claims that the fact that it is even using the escrow money to pay back the loan instead of using it all to shore itself up shows that it is on the road to recovery. That actually would be a positive development—although hardly one worth hyping in ads and columns—if it were not for a further plot twist.

Sean McAlinden, chief economist at the Ann Arbor-based Center for Automotive Research, points out that the company has applied to the Department of Energy for $10 billion in low (5 percent) interest loan to retool its plants to meet the government’s tougher new CAFÉ (Corporate Average Fuel Economy) standards. However, giving GM more taxpayer money on top of the existing bailout would have been a political disaster for the Obama administration and a PR debacle for the company. Paying back the


continue reading


Tags: , , , ,




2010 Tech Debutantes Cool Off – Time For a Look

2010 Tech Debutantes Cool Off – Time For a Look

Courtesy of Joshua M Brown, The Reformed Broker 

A handful of young, vivacious tech stocks made their debuts this year, but I pretty much kept my hands to myself upon their arrival.

You couldn’t buy any of these smoke shows when they IPO’d earlier this year, they were pricing above the range and opening at huge premiums.  Now that the market’s pulled back, I’m doing some homework.

I haven’t yet formed an investment opinion on these names, I’m only now throwing them up on my radar.

Meru Networks ($MERU) - Founded in 2002, Meru is about helping small and midsized businesses with their internet connection needs.  According to 24/7 Wall Street, it "was hot at the IPO (for as much as a 30% gain in the first day and headed south since.  The networking solutions company came public at $15.00 and is now down 7.8% at $13.83."  (source: 24/7 Wall Street)

Calix Networks ($CALX- "Jefferies & Co. analyst George Notter launched with a Buy rating $16 target. ‘Calix is a direct way to play the broadband stimulus plan,’ he writes. ‘We expect Calix to begin recognizing revenues from this spending in late 2010, with the bulk of the benefit hitting the top-line in 2011 and 2012.’" (source: Barron’s)

SS&C Software ($SSNC) - A well-established maker of software for institutional investment managers (funds, trading firms, banks etc).  Ridiculous 49% profit margins, some debt.  Jeffries, Raymond James, JPMorgan and Credit Suisse all initiated it with buys on May 10th, Wells Fargo started it at an Equal Weight. (source: Street Insider)

Alpha & Omega Semiconductors ($AOSL) - Power and battery efficiency is so hot right now as all these mobile computing devices are energy drainers.  This one does power management chips.  "Alpha & Omega Semiconductor, a leading supplier of power management chips for laptops, flat panel displays and a variety of consumer electronic devices."  (source: Seeking Alpha)

There were one or two other tech IPOs that came out this year but these are the ones I’m trying to learn more about.

Here’s a quick look at how they’ve fared since descending the staircase into the ballroom:

 

 


Tags: , , , ,




Vintage Wine Turns Sour for Financiers

Vintage Wine Turns Sour for Financiers

By Alex Daley and Doug Hornig, Casey Research

Shopping basket red wine bottles

When the folks at a private equity firm gather at the holiday party refreshment table to talk about “vintage,” they aren’t commenting on the Château Pétrus.

The world of private equity financing doesn’t have high visibility, but it is big business behind the scenes. Unlike venture capital outfits – which provide startup money to very early-stage companies – those who play this game grab existing private companies, often through leveraged buyouts (LBOs). Each year’s investments are referred to as vintages, with some being more highly drinkable than others.

Now, some of the recent vintages look like they’ll turn out to be little more than vinegar.

Private equity investing has never been for the faint of heart. But investors continue to engage in it, because the payoff can be substantial. And for the first few years of the new millennium, it was a go-go place to be. With so much easy money sloshing around, the number of PE deals exploded, totaling over half a trillion dollars at the manic peak in ’07.

Then came the crash:

                                                                                                

It’s important to remember that credit was not a single bubble. It was a bubble machine. It created the housing bubble, which fueled the personal debt bubble (which in turn popped the housing bubble, but that’s another story). The mortgage market gave birth to a whole new range of derivatives, things like collateralized debt obligations (CDOs), mortgage-backed securities (MBSs), and the rest of the acronyms we’ve all become familiar with, even if we don’t quite understand what they do. (Don’t be embarrassed, neither did the financial geniuses who swapped them like baseball cards.)

Frantic trading in these newly printed scraps of paper created its own bubble, manufacturing an incredible amount of seeming liquidity in a very compressed time frame. We know the ultimate consequences to the balance sheets of our banks, and our government, by now. But there was more to it than that. The capital these transactions threw off had to go somewhere, and suddenly well-capitalized investors were pouring their
continue reading


Tags: , , ,




 
 
 

Zero Hedge

Rabobank: "So, It Was Right Not To 'Buy The Dip'?"

Courtesy of ZeroHedge View original post here.

Authored by Michael Every via Rabobank,

So it was right not to “buy the dip”. 

Virus cases continue to escalate almost everywhere that already had them, despite government lockdowns, and nobody and nowhere is proving immune. Iran’s Vice-President is infected and their ambassador to the Vatican has just died from it; now the Pope is feeling ill, if not necessarily with COVID-19.

Nigeria has its first case,...



more from Tyler

Phil's Favorites

Disney teams up with Secret Cinema - watching movies will never be the same again

 

Disney teams up with Secret Cinema – watching movies will never be the same again

Secret Cinema’s production of Moulin Rouge. Secret Cinema

Courtesy of Sarah Atkinson, King's College London and Helen W. Kennedy, University of Nottingham

Disney’s recent deal with the immersive experience company Secret Cinema signals a new era for the cinema industry. New film titles from the Disne...



more from Ilene

Kimble Charting Solutions

Financial Crisis Deja Vu: Home Construction Index Double Top?

Courtesy of Chris Kimble

Most of us remember the 2007-2009 financial crisis because of the collapse in home prices and its effect on the economy.

One key sector that tipped off that crisis was the home builders.

The home builders are an integral piece to our economy and often signal “all clears” or “short-term warnings” to investors based on their economic health and how the index trades.

In today’s chart, we highlight the Dow Jones Home Construction Index. It has climbed all the way back to its pre-crisis highs… BUT it immediately reversed lower from there.

This raises concerns about a double top.

This pr...



more from Kimble C.S.

Insider Scoop

A Peek Into The Markets: US Stock Futures Plunge Amid Coronavirus Fears

Courtesy of Benzinga

Pre-open movers

U.S. stock futures traded lower in early pre-market trade. South Korea confirmed 256 new coronavirus cases on Thursday, while China reported an additional 327 new cases. Data on U.S. international trade in goods for January, wholesale inventories for January and consumer spending for January will be released at 8:30 a.m. ET. The Chicago PMI for February is scheduled for release at 9:45 a.m. ET, while the University of Michigan's consumer sentime...



http://www.insidercow.com/ more from Insider

Biotech & Health

Could coronavirus really trigger a recession?

 

Could coronavirus really trigger a recession?

Coronavirus seems to be on a collision course with the US economy and its 12-year bull market. AP Photo/Ng Han Guan

Courtesy of Michael Walden, North Carolina State University

Fears are growing that the new coronavirus will infect the U.S. economy.

A major U.S. stock market index posted its biggest two-day drop on record, erasing all the gains from the previous two months; ...



more from Biotech

The Technical Traders

SPY Breaks Below Fibonacci Bearish Trigger Level

Courtesy of Technical Traders

Our research team wanted to share this chart with our friends and followers.  This dramatic breakdown in price over the past 4+ days has resulted in a very clear bearish trigger which was confirmed by our Adaptive Fibonacci Price Modeling system.  We believe this downside move will target the $251 level on the SPY over the next few weeks and months.

Some recent headline articles worth reading:

On January 23, 2020, we ...



more from Tech. Traders

Promotions

Free, Live Webinar on Stocks, Options and Trading Strategies

TODAY's LIVE webinar on stocks, options and trading strategy is open to all!

Feb. 26, 1pm EST

Click HERE to join the PSW weekly webinar at 1 pm EST.

Phil will discuss positions, COVID-19, market volatility -- the selloff -- and more! 

This week, we also have a special presentation from Mike Anton of TradeExchange.com. It's a new service that we're excited to be a part of! 

Mike will show off the TradeExchange's new platform which you can try for free.  

...

more from Promotions

Chart School

Oil cycle leads the stock cycle

Courtesy of Read the Ticker

Sure correlation is not causation, but this chart should be known by you.

We all know the world economy was waiting for a pin to prick the 'everything bubble', but no one had any idea of what the pin would look like.

Hence this is why the story of the black swan is so relevant.






There is massive debt behind the record high stock markets, there so much debt the political will required to allow central banks to print trillions to cover losses will likely effect elections. The point is printing money to cover billions is unlikely to upset anyone, however printing trillions will. In 2007 it was billions, in 202X it ...

more from Chart School

Members' Corner

Threats to democracy: oligarchy, feudalism, dictatorship

 

Threats to democracy: oligarchy, feudalism, dictatorship

Courtesy of David Brin, Contrary Brin Blog 

Fascinating and important to consider, since it is probably one of the reasons why the world aristocracy is pulling its all-out putsch right now… “Trillions will be inherited over the coming decades, further widening the wealth gap,” reports the Los Angeles Times. The beneficiaries aren’t all that young themselves. From 1989 to 2016, U.S. households inherited more than $8.5 trillion. Over that time, the average age of recipients rose by a decade to 51. More ...



more from Our Members

Digital Currencies

Altcoin season 2.0: why bitcoin has been outgunned by crypto rivals since new year

 

Altcoin season 2.0: why bitcoin has been outgunned by crypto rivals since new year

‘We have you surrounded!’ Wit Olszewski

Courtesy of Gavin Brown, Manchester Metropolitan University and Richard Whittle, Manchester Metropolitan University

When bitcoin was trading at the dizzying heights of almost US$2...



more from Bitcoin

ValueWalk

What US companies are saying about coronavirus impact

By Aman Jain. Originally published at ValueWalk.

With the coronavirus outbreak coinciding with the U.S. earnings seasons, it is only normal to expect companies to talk about this deadly virus in their earnings conference calls. In fact, many major U.S. companies not only talked about coronavirus, but also warned about its potential impact on their financial numbers.

Q4 2019 hedge fund letters, conferences and more

Coronavirus impact: many US companies unclear

According to ...



more from ValueWalk

Lee's Free Thinking

Why Blaming the Repo Market is Like Blaming the Australian Bush Fires

 

Why Blaming the Repo Market is Like Blaming the Australian Bush Fires

Courtesy of  

The repo market problem isn’t the problem. It’s a sideshow, a diversion, and a joke. It’s a symptom of the problem.

Today, I got a note from Liquidity Trader subscriber David, a professional investor, and it got me to thinking. Here’s what David wrote:

Lee,

The ‘experts’ I hear from keep saying that once 300B more in reserves have ...



more from Lee

Mapping The Market

How IPOs Are Priced

Via Jean Luc 

Funny but probably true:

...

more from M.T.M.





About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

Learn more About Phil >>


As Seen On:




About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.