Posts Tagged ‘National Debt’

Friday Follies – Will Today be the 13th Day Below S&P 2,000?

SPY 5 MINUTE12 failures so far.

12 trading days since the S&P first hit 2,000 (Aug 25th) in which we have failed to hold 2,000 for a full day.  Not one and, unless the Futures pop 10 points before we open, not today either.  On 10 of those days, we've had a late-day run-up on low volume that popped us over 2,000 and on 7 of those days, 2,000 held at the close but EVERY SINGLE DAY – it also failed to hold.  

Let's not forget that, during this time, we've had TRILLIONS of Dollars of additional stimulus pledged by Carney, Draghi, Kuroda and other minor Central Banksters and Yellen has certainly been as doveish as she could by (while still tapering our existing Trillion Dollar stimulus).  This is how our market behaves WITH Trillions of Dollars of cash being pumped into the Global economy – I wonder what will happen when it stops?  

Of course, maybe it won't stop but, if it doesn't, this chart will look even uglier.  This is a chart of our projected net annual interest payments on our debt in 10 years.  That's $880 BILLION Dollars each year, just in interest payments, up $650Bn from the $233Bn we are spending now.  

That's WITHOUT additional stimulus so I guess we can go for a bit more and make it an even Trillion, right?  These are what we used to call CONSEQENCES – back when we used to care about such things.  The US is not the leader in debt issuance, not by a long shot.  Japan is 150% more in debt than we are and China has now doubled our debt to GDP ratio, after having been a creditor back in 2007 but now the undisputed king of stimulus spending.    

EWG WEEKLYEurope is also a mess.  As I said to our Members in an early-morning Alert:  Another thing the US Media is purposely ignoring is the 12.5% correction in Europe (example on Germany chart) since July that, so far, has bounced weakly (4-point drop on EWG has weak bounce at 28.8 and strong at 29.6) – failing exactly
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The Show Must Go On

Courtesy of Jim Quinn, The Burning Platform

The Debt Ceiling Reality Show is winding down to its dramatic conclusion on August 2. I think Fox should capitalize on the drama by gathering the American Idol judges to vote on the best performance by a political hack. We can have Ryan Seacrest announce on August 1 at 11:55 pm that the winner is – THE WALL STREET MONIED INTERESTS.

  

The latest round of kabuki theatre performed by the corrupt lying thieves in Washington DC is being played out every night on the MSM. The volume of misinformation, lies, exaggerations, posturing, and propaganda is staggering. These vile excuses for leaders know that 80% of the American population wouldn’t know the difference between a debt ceiling and a drop ceiling. They use this ignorance to their advantage, as Obama warns that old people won’t get their social security checks and government drones won’t be paid. 

According to Gallup, Republicans and Independents don’t want the debt ceiling raised. The poll also indicates that at least one third of Americans don’t care. They are too outraged by the Casey Anthony verdict to focus on the economic future of our country.

Debt Ceiling Poll

I’ll let you in on a secret. The debt ceiling will be raised. Sorry to ruin the surprise, but this entire sordid episode has nothing to do with our dire economic situation. It is solely about the 2012 elections. Both parties are conducting overnight polling on which talking points are working best in convincing the sheeple that their party is less likely to be blamed. Posturing and polling are what passes for leadership in America. It is a disgusting display and will contribute to the ultimate collapse that is headed our way like a Japanese Bullet Train.

Here is a summary of where we stand according to the MSM and the political class in Washington DC:

  • The supposedly grand compromise that would have “cut” $4 trillion from future deficits fell apart last week. The Democarats wouldn’t “cut” entitlements and the Republicans wouldn’t “raise” taxes.
  • The latest proposal was down to $2 trillion of future “cuts”, but neither side would agree to what and when.
  • Now in the ultimate Washington kick the can move, Mitch “Turtle Face” McConnell has proposed that Obama increase the debt limit in three stages, while requiring him to propose offsetting spending cuts, offering a potential path out of the


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Kyle Bass With David Faber: Bernanke’s ZIRP Is An ‘Inescapable Trap;’ Muni Bond Bloodbath Beckons But “States Will NOT Default”

Courtesy of The Daily Bail  

CNBC Video – Kyle Bass with David Faber – Feb. 16, 2011 

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Video – Part 2

Source – CNBC

Municipal bond defaults on the local level are likely and investors would be better off avoiding them, according to Kyle Bass, managing director of Hayman Capital.

Bass said he generally agrees with the call by famed banking analyst Meredith Whitney, who said as many as 100 defaults are likely that will cost more than $100 billion in damage.

Though Whitney’s call has prompted substantial backlash from her colleagues in the industry, Bass said the question is more a matter of degree.

"There are going to be a number of muni defaults, but it’s where you draw the line.  Will states be allowed to default?  Will legislation be introduced to allow states to restructure?  I don’t believe that’s the case.  I believe states will not default." 


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The Road to World War III – The Global Banking Cartel Has One Card Left to Play

The Road to World War III – The Global Banking Cartel Has One Card Left to Play

By David DeGraw (h/t ZH)

The following is Part I to David DeGraw’s new book, “The Road Through 2012: Revolution or World War III.” This is the second installment to a new seven-part series that we will be posting throughout the next few weeks. You can read the introduction to the book here. To be notified via email of new postings from this series, subscribe here.

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Editor’s Note: The following is Part I to David DeGraw’s new book, “The Road Through 2012: Revolution or World War III.” This is the second installment to a new seven-part series that we will be posting throughout the next few weeks. You can read the introduction to the book here. To be notified via email of new postings from this series, subscribe here.

I: Economic Imperial Operations

The Road to World War III - The Global Banking Cartel Has One Card Left to PlayWhen we analyze our current crisis, focusing on the past few years of economic activity blinds us to the history and context that are vital to understanding the root cause. What we have been experiencing is not the result of an unforeseen economic crash that appeared out of the blue with the collapse of the housing market. It was certainly not brought on by people who bought homes they couldn’t afford. To frame this crisis around a debate on economic theory misses the point entirely. To even blame it on greedy bankers,…
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Michael Pento Asks If The Fed Ultimately Controls Interest Rates

Michael Pento Asks If The Fed Ultimately Controls Interest Rates

Courtesy of Tyler Durden

NEW YORK - APRIL 28: A trader on the New York Stock Exchange walks by a monitor displaying the federal funds rate made at an afternoon announcement by the Federal Reserve on April 28, 2010 in New York, New York. Following a two day meeting, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke held the fed funds rate at historic lows near zero in order to keep the economy growing. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)

By Michael Pento of Euro Pacific Capital

Does the Fed Ultimately Control Interest Rates?

In forecasting the consequences of current economic policy, many pundits are downplaying the risks associated with the surging national debt and the rapid expansion of marketable Treasury securities. Their comfort stems from the belief that a staggering debt burden will be manageable as long as interest rates remain extremely low; and, as they believe the Fed is in complete control of setting rates across the yield curve, they see no danger of rates ever rising past the point of comfort. Those who subscribe to this fairy tale forget that, in real life, there are many more hands on the interest rate steering wheel.

The Congressional Budget Office estimates that the 2010 deficit will exceed $1.3 trillion and total US debt now stands at $13.4 trillion (92% of GDP). That’s a lot of debt that needs floating. Yet, the 10-year note is yielding 2.8%-- which is 4.5 points below its 40-year average of 7.3%! Experience teaches that even moderately long-term investors should be expecting rising rates. Regardless of the extreme and obvious misalignment of fundamentals and bond prices, the mantra from the dollar shills remains firm: “The US dollar will always be the world’s reserve currency, and the US bond market will always be regarded as the safe-haven depository for global savings.”

With interest rates having been so low for so long, it’s understandable that many people have forgotten that central banks are not ultimately in control of interest rates. It is true that the Fed can be highly influential across the yield curve and can be especially effective in controlling the short end. But, in the end, the free market has the last word on the cost of money.

Although the Fed has certainly created enough new dollars to send prices higher, recessionary forces are, for now, disguising the evidence of runaway inflation. But when inflation finally erupts into the daylight, it will be impossible for borrowing costs to stay low. No one can realistically be expected to loan money below the rate of inflation. To attract buyers, the Treasury will have to offer a real rate of return.

Since our publicly traded debt level is increasing while our personal saving rate is not, we must inevitably…
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‘Call It $130 Trillion or So’

‘Call It $130 Trillion or So’

Americans All! Victory Loan. Ca. 1919. Color poster by Howard Chandler Christy. (Bureau of Public Debt) Exact Date Shot Unknown NARA FILE #: 053-WP-4C WAR & CONFLICT BOOK #: 526

Courtesy of Michael Panzner of Financial Armageddon

If you’ve ever had to deal with teenagers or IT workers, you know the drill: whatever they tell you something will cost usually turns out to be less — often much less — than you end up paying. Politicians, too, are especially good at this game, which is not surprising given that most don’t expect to be around when the final bill comes in. So, in theory at least, no one should be unsettled by the fact, as the following National Review commentary, "The Other National Debt," by deputy managing editor Kevin D. Williamson, reveals, that the amount of money we (and our ancestors) are currently on the hook for is around ten times what our leaders say it is — right?

About that $14 trillion national debt: Get ready to tack some zeroes onto it. Taken alone, the amount of debt issued by the federal government — that $14 trillion figure that shows up on the national ledger — is a terrifying, awesome, hellacious number: Fourteen trillion seconds ago, Greenland was covered by lush and verdant forests, and the Neanderthals had not yet been outwitted and driven into extinction by Homo sapiens sapiens, because we did not yet exist. Big number, 14 trillion, and yet it doesn’t even begin to cover the real indebtedness of American governments at the federal, state, and local levels, because governments don’t count up their liabilities the same way businesses do.

Accountants get a bad rap — boring, green-eyeshades-wearing, nebbishy little men chained to their desks down in the fluorescent-lit basements of Corporate America — but, in truth, accountants wield an awesome power. In the case of the federal  government, they wield the power to make vast amounts of debt disappear — from the public discourse, at least. A couple of months ago, you may recall, Rep. Henry Waxman (D., State of Bankruptcy) got his Fruit of the Looms in a full-on buntline hitch when AT&T, Caterpillar, Verizon, and a host of other blue-chip behemoths started taking plus-size writedowns in response to some of the more punitive provisions of the health-care legislation Mr. Waxman had helped to pass. His little mustache no doubt bristling in indignation, Representative Waxman sent dunning letters to the CEOs of these companies and demanded that they come before Congress to explain


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Tsunami of Red Ink – Global Look at National Debt and Who Owns US Debt

Tsunami of Red Ink – Global Look at National Debt and Who Owns US Debt

Courtesy of Mish 

The Chicago Tribune had an excellent set of charts this weekend in A Tsunami of Red Ink regarding US government debt and who owns it, and also a comparison of US debt to the national debt of other countries.

Debt as a Percentage of GDP

Comparison of US Debt to Other Countries

Click on the link at the top to see foreign holders of US debt country by country. The top three US debt holders are China, Japan, and Canada.

Some will not believe those figures on debt to GDP comparisons. I don’t either. For starters the numbers are from 2009.

The footnote also says, if intragovernmental debt is included the figure is 83%. That number is approximately correct in my opinion (as of 2009).

Some will want to count unfunded Social Security and Medicare liabilities out to 2050 or whatever. This is simply wrong. That would be like counting a car you intend to buy 3 years from now as part of your debt now.

Many things can happen between now and then.

  • You may buy a smaller car.
  • You may not buy the car at all, opting for public transportation.
  • When the time arrives, you may postpone buying a car for a couple more years.
  • You may save enough to pay for the car in cash so that you incur no debt.

Likewise, the plans for Social Security and Medicare might change. Costs may go up, or down. The plans may be scaled back by the next generation of US citizens who think our generation was the most greedy in history.

Things We Know

  • The current path and current plans are not sustainable.
  • The money has not been spent, yet.
  • Costs may go up or down.
  • Political promises can easily change.
  • Taxes may go up dramatically, to pay for the costs.

Mike "Mish" Shedlock

 


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Wall Street Deficit Hawks Have No Shame

Wall Street Deficit Hawks Have No Shame

alan greenspanCourtesy of Dean Baker of Center for Economic and Policy Research

Almost 25 million people are unemployed or underemployed right now. This was a completely preventable disaster. This is worth repeating a few hundred billion times so that even the geniuses in Washington can understand it.

The disaster was completely preventable. The reason we had the disaster was that the people controlling economic policy, that would be people like Alan Greenspan and Robert Rubin, either had no clue about the housing bubble or deliberately decided to ignore it.

Nothing about this story is complicated – let’s write this so that even a Wall Street billionaire can understand it. We had an $8 trillion housing bubble. It was inevitable that it would collapse. Bubbles do that. When we get an over-priced housing market then builders build more homes. That’s because it becomes very profitable to build homes when prices are high. If builders keep building lots of homes, then eventually there will not be enough people to buy them at bubble–inflated prices, even with the loony mortgages being pushed at the time by the Wall Street banks.

When people can no longer buy homes, their prices drop. When their prices drop people will default on their mortgages and banks lose lots of money.

man read a newspaper in bath

More importantly, when prices drop, builders stop building homes. People also stop spending money based on their housing bubble wealth. The falloff in construction and consumption implies more than $1 trillion in lost demand in the economy. This lost demand throws the economy into a serious recession, with tens of millions of people losing their jobs. It’s all very very simple. You probably don’t even need an intro economics course to understand it.

But, the deficit hawks, led by Wall Street investment banker Peter Peterson either did not see the bubble or chose to ignore it. They ran around the country in the peak years of the housing bubble yelling about “fiscal irresponsibility” even as the housing bubble was growing to ever more dangerous levels. They used their money and their political standing to dominate public debate and crowd out those of us who were trying to warn about the bubble. There were numerous television shows, radio shows and news stories devoted to their dire warnings about the deficit. They even persuaded a major documentary maker to put out…
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Speculative Premium – And Why The Markets Will CRASH

Karl argues that the "animal idiocy" we’ve seen over the last year is proof that we’ve learned absolutely nothing. Hard to take the other side of that one. – Ilene 

Speculative Premium – And Why The Markets Will CRASH

Courtesy of Karl Denninger at The Market Ticker 

Housing Crisis Hits Rockaways In New York

Yes, I said CRASH, and I meant it.

Why?

"Events" like this:

SINGAPORE/CAIRO, March 1 (Reuters) – Copper is likely to
climb when trading starts on Monday, lifted by uncertainty over
supply after the world’s top copper producer Chile was pounded
by a massive earthquake, analysts said over the weekend.

The front-month contract opened up more than 8%.

This, despite the fact that the earthquake was hundreds of miles away from the mines in Chile and there was zero damage to them.  Some were offline for a few hours due to power failures, but none suffered any physical or structural damage, nor did their export points and the transportation network between the two.

So why did price spike more than 8% even though all this was known by the market before it re-opened for trading?

No part of the markets are trading on fundamental values, nor on forward business expectations.  They are instead trading as "hot money" repositories where speculators rotate in and out of various instruments literally on a minute-by-minute basis.

This is how crashes happen.

When there is no fundamental value underlying a market there is no floor on price.  Price then becomes one thing and one thing only – the number at which you can find another sucker to take your position from you.

This is how tulip bulbs went nuts in Holland, it is how houses went nuts in California in 2005, it is how tech stocks went nuts in 1999 and it is how oil went nuts in 2008.

But now literally everything has gone this way.

Take European national debt.  We now know that Italy, for example, was cooking their books as early as 1995.  This means that bond buyers overpaid for their bonds and took less coupon than they should have.  This should have resulted in an immediate destruction in the value of those bonds when discovered, but it did not. 

Why? 

Portrait of a man standing dressed as a school boy holding a school bag

Because there was still a bigger fool.

Tech stocks were the same thing in 1999.  These "companies" claimed the…
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AMERICAN PIE

Jim Quinn presents a most dire prediction of our national journey into a hellish nightmare, the worst yet to come. 

Was it all foretold in this incredible song? – Ilene

Don McLean – American Pie – Live On Imus In The Morning

AMERICAN PIE

Courtesy of Jim Quinn at The Burning Platform  

“The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts.”
                                                                                                Bertrand Russell
 
http://stash.norml.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/don-mclean-american-pie.jpg 
http://jaksview3.files.wordpress.com/2009/02/musicdied.jpg
 
Don McLean was born in 1945 and grew up in New Rochelle, New York. He was one of the earliest Baby Boomers. He was born at the beginning of America’s last High, as described by Strauss & Howe in their book The Fourth Turning. America’s victory in World War II began a new 80 to 100 year cycle consisting of four turnings of 20 to 25 years. The four cycles are a High, an Awakening, an Unraveling and a Crisis. These cycles have been recurring throughout history due to the generational mood changes as people age. Don McLean grew up during a High. This was an episode of safety and security. He basked in “Dr. Spock permissiveness, suburban conformism, Sputnik-era schooling, Beaver Cleaver friendliness, and Father Knows Best family order.” His idyllic life changed on the morning of February 3, 1959 when he read the headline in the newspaper he was about to deliver.
 
http://30daysout.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/m590203k.jpg http://musicmaven.files.wordpress.com/2009/01/winter_dance_party.jpg
 
A long long time ago
I can still remember
How that music used to make me smile
And I knew if I had my chance
That I could make those people dance
And maybe they’d be happy for a while
But February made me shiver
With every paper I’d deliver
Bad news on the doorstep
I couldn’t take one more step
I can’t remember if I cried
When I read about his widowed bride
But something touched me deep inside
The day the music died
So bye, bye Miss American Pie
Drove my Chevy to the levee but the levee was dry
And them good old boys were drinking whiskey and rye
Singing this’ll be the day that I die


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Kimble Charting Solutions

Financial Crisis Deja Vu: Home Construction Index Double Top?

Courtesy of Chris Kimble

Most of us remember the 2007-2009 financial crisis because of the collapse in home prices and its effect on the economy.

One key sector that tipped off that crisis was the home builders.

The home builders are an integral piece to our economy and often signal “all clears” or “short-term warnings” to investors based on their economic health and how the index trades.

In today’s chart, we highlight the Dow Jones Home Construction Index. It has climbed all the way back to its pre-crisis highs… BUT it immediately reversed lower from there.

This raises concerns about a double top.

This pr...



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Insider Scoop

A Peek Into The Markets: US Stock Futures Plunge Amid Coronavirus Fears

Courtesy of Benzinga

Pre-open movers

U.S. stock futures traded lower in early pre-market trade. South Korea confirmed 256 new coronavirus cases on Thursday, while China reported an additional 327 new cases. Data on U.S. international trade in goods for January, wholesale inventories for January and consumer spending for January will be released at 8:30 a.m. ET. The Chicago PMI for February is scheduled for release at 9:45 a.m. ET, while the University of Michigan's consumer sentime...



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Zero Hedge

Coronavirus Paralyzes Global Credit Market As New Issuance Crashes To Zero

Courtesy of ZeroHedge View original post here.

In the early days, when virtually nobody paid attention to the coronavirus pandemic which China was doing everything in its power to cover up, markets were not only predictably ignoring the potential global plague - after all central banks can always print more money, or is that antibodies - but until last week, were hitting all time highs. All that changed when it became apparent that for all its data manipulation, China was simply unable to reboot its economy as hundreds of millions of workers refused to believe the government had the viral plague under control, starting...



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Phil's Favorites

The PhilStockWorld.com Weekly Webinar - 02-26-2020

 

For LIVE access on Wednesday afternoons, join us at Phil's Stock World – click here.

Major Topics:

00:02:13 - Indices | S&P 500
00:10:09 - COVID-19 & The Market
00:12:30 - John Hopkins Virus Chart
00:17:00 - DJIA
00:18:22 - INQ | Futures
00:19:23 - STP
00:20:06 - LTP
00:24:46 - GOLD
00:25:45 - Money Talk Portfolio | Butterfly Portfolio
00:27:20 - IMAX
00:30:01 - Checking on the Markets
00:30:54 - Money Talk Portfolio
00:31:00 - Butterfly Portfolio
00:31:08 - Future is Now Portfolio
00:31:12 - Dividend Portfolio...



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Biotech & Health

Could coronavirus really trigger a recession?

 

Could coronavirus really trigger a recession?

Coronavirus seems to be on a collision course with the US economy and its 12-year bull market. AP Photo/Ng Han Guan

Courtesy of Michael Walden, North Carolina State University

Fears are growing that the new coronavirus will infect the U.S. economy.

A major U.S. stock market index posted its biggest two-day drop on record, erasing all the gains from the previous two months; ...



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The Technical Traders

SPY Breaks Below Fibonacci Bearish Trigger Level

Courtesy of Technical Traders

Our research team wanted to share this chart with our friends and followers.  This dramatic breakdown in price over the past 4+ days has resulted in a very clear bearish trigger which was confirmed by our Adaptive Fibonacci Price Modeling system.  We believe this downside move will target the $251 level on the SPY over the next few weeks and months.

Some recent headline articles worth reading:

On January 23, 2020, we ...



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Promotions

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Phil will discuss positions, COVID-19, market volatility -- the selloff -- and more! 

This week, we also have a special presentation from Mike Anton of TradeExchange.com. It's a new service that we're excited to be a part of! 

Mike will show off the TradeExchange's new platform which you can try for free.  

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Chart School

Oil cycle leads the stock cycle

Courtesy of Read the Ticker

Sure correlation is not causation, but this chart should be known by you.

We all know the world economy was waiting for a pin to prick the 'everything bubble', but no one had any idea of what the pin would look like.

Hence this is why the story of the black swan is so relevant.






There is massive debt behind the record high stock markets, there so much debt the political will required to allow central banks to print trillions to cover losses will likely effect elections. The point is printing money to cover billions is unlikely to upset anyone, however printing trillions will. In 2007 it was billions, in 202X it ...

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Members' Corner

Threats to democracy: oligarchy, feudalism, dictatorship

 

Threats to democracy: oligarchy, feudalism, dictatorship

Courtesy of David Brin, Contrary Brin Blog 

Fascinating and important to consider, since it is probably one of the reasons why the world aristocracy is pulling its all-out putsch right now… “Trillions will be inherited over the coming decades, further widening the wealth gap,” reports the Los Angeles Times. The beneficiaries aren’t all that young themselves. From 1989 to 2016, U.S. households inherited more than $8.5 trillion. Over that time, the average age of recipients rose by a decade to 51. More ...



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Digital Currencies

Altcoin season 2.0: why bitcoin has been outgunned by crypto rivals since new year

 

Altcoin season 2.0: why bitcoin has been outgunned by crypto rivals since new year

‘We have you surrounded!’ Wit Olszewski

Courtesy of Gavin Brown, Manchester Metropolitan University and Richard Whittle, Manchester Metropolitan University

When bitcoin was trading at the dizzying heights of almost US$2...



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ValueWalk

What US companies are saying about coronavirus impact

By Aman Jain. Originally published at ValueWalk.

With the coronavirus outbreak coinciding with the U.S. earnings seasons, it is only normal to expect companies to talk about this deadly virus in their earnings conference calls. In fact, many major U.S. companies not only talked about coronavirus, but also warned about its potential impact on their financial numbers.

Q4 2019 hedge fund letters, conferences and more

Coronavirus impact: many US companies unclear

According to ...



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Lee's Free Thinking

Why Blaming the Repo Market is Like Blaming the Australian Bush Fires

 

Why Blaming the Repo Market is Like Blaming the Australian Bush Fires

Courtesy of  

The repo market problem isn’t the problem. It’s a sideshow, a diversion, and a joke. It’s a symptom of the problem.

Today, I got a note from Liquidity Trader subscriber David, a professional investor, and it got me to thinking. Here’s what David wrote:

Lee,

The ‘experts’ I hear from keep saying that once 300B more in reserves have ...



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Mapping The Market

How IPOs Are Priced

Via Jean Luc 

Funny but probably true:

...

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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.