Posts Tagged ‘risk assets’

Blah Blah Blah Quantitative Easing Blah Blah Blah – “I Want a New Drug”

Blah Blah Blah Quantitative Easing Blah Blah Blah – "I Want a New Drug"

Courtesy of KID DYNAMITE’S WORLD

Machine

Let’s step back into our time machine and travel alllllll the way back to the 2000-2009 decade – the one we just finished. We suffered a massive financial crisis because we, as a country and a world really, had borrowed and lent far too much money based on paper asset prices. The assets in question were homes, and the prices were inflated by a massive ignorance of risk on the part of all parties – borrowers, lenders, insurers, modelers, financial wizards, etc. When we borrowed money based on paper asset prices, we were totally hosed when the prices of those assets declined and we then couldn’t afford to pay back our loans.

Now press "live" on your remote, and return your DVR time machine to the present. The solution our fearless leaders at the Federal Reserve have chosen is to run this play again – quantitative easing is designed to inflate asset prices, which in turn will hopefully result in people feeling wealthier, borrowing more, and spending more – it’s a "virtuous cycle!!!"  Bernanke actually told us this, specifically, in an Op-ed today:

Easier financial conditions will promote economic growth. For example, lower mortgage rates will make housing more affordable and allow more homeowners to refinance. Lower corporate bond rates will encourage investment. And higher stock prices will boost consumer wealth and help increase confidence, which can also spur spending. Increased spending will lead to higher incomes and profits that, in a virtuous circle, will further support economic expansion.

Just to recap, the Fed’s basic goal (in my opinion) is to force capital into risk assets. The Fed buys treasuries, driving their yields to unappealing levels, until investors are forced to put their money into other asset classes: stocks, corporate bonds, commodities. As that happens, portfolio valuations increase, everyone is supposed to feel good again, and we go out and spend money, which flows through to the rest of the economy. Now get back in the time machine and crank it back just a handful of years. How did that work out last time? Of course it was great while the bubble was inflating – flat screen TVs and newly landscaped yards for everybody! – but reality is always a bitch, and bubbles…
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MORE BUBBLE TALK

MORE BUBBLE TALK

Courtesy of The Pragmatic Capitalist 

Oil being poured into water, studio shot

It’s becoming increasingly popular to describe the U.S. government bond market as a “bubble.” As I’ve previously explained, this strikes me as totally nonsensical for several reasons – the primary reason being that the term simply is not applicable to an asset in which you receive your entire principle back at maturity. The term “bubble” implies a grossly mispriced asset that is susceptible to substantial losses. If the instrument is used as intended there should be little to no risk of principal loss in a U.S. government bond.  And given the weak economy and constant need for government intervention it is no surprise that investors are seeking a safe haven such as bonds.

Aside from all that, Credit Suisse recently published an interesting piece of research arguing the same point – that the U.S. bond market is not a bubble.  They noted that the price action in government bonds is very different from historical bubbles:

“We note that the price action of bonds it is very different from the bubbles in other asset classes we have seen over the last 30 years. The six-month US bond return is 1.9 standard deviations above norm, compared to an average of 5.9 standard deviations during previous bubbles.”

So you can see the price action is not even remotely similar to the great bubbles in history.  If investors continue to use government bonds as they are intended (for instance, don’t make a 10 year loan with the intention of demanding your money back in 10 minutes), diversify across bond markets and generally allocate bonds as they are intended (as a hedge against other higher risk assets) then there should be very little risk of you ever experiencing a catastrophic loss such as those seen after many of the great bubbles of the last 30 years. 


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TALKING OURSELVES OFF THE EDGE OF THE CLIFF

TALKING OURSELVES OFF THE EDGE OF THE CLIFF

WSOP No-Limit Texas Hold 'em World Championship

Courtesy of The Pragmatic Capitalist 

Yesterday’s WSJ MarketBeat blog took David Einhorn to task for his op-ed in the NY Times titled “Easy Money, Hard Truths“.  They make the argument that Einhorn is simply pushing his massive gold position.  I fear Einhorn is doing something much worse – helping to scare us all into continued recession.

First off, I have no problem when someone talks their book.  In fact, I almost prefer for people to talk their book.  There’s a certain trust in someone who is willing to “put their money where their mouth is”.  It’s the primary reason why I believe the hedge fund business is such a wonderful advancement beyond traditional mutual funds – the manager’s interests are generally aligned with those of the investor.  If you can find a manager who is not only intelligent, but has a sound moral compass you’ve wandered upon quite a gem.  From all accounts David Einhorn appears to fit the mold.  But I take very serious issue with his recent comments which I believe are filled with half-truths and propaganda that we continually hear from the inflationistas (all of whom have been terribly wrong thus far in terms of their macroeconomic outlook) who are driving the country towards the edge of the cliff.

Einhorn is a great investor and clearly a brilliant man, but for two years I have watched policymakers and fear mongerers misdiagnose the problems that we confront and this is, in my opinion, why we are still wrangling with these issues. In 2008 I wrote a letter to the Federal Reserve saying that this was a classic “balance sheet recession” with problems rooted in the private sector – specifically the consumer.  I told them that saving banks was not the solution and that monetary policy would prove as fruitless in the U.S. as it has in Japan.  I was shocked to receive a friendly response to my letter but not shocked to see Mr. Bernanke implement his Friedman-like monetarist campaign of “saving the world”.  Obviously it hasn’t worked (unless you’re a banker) as we sit here two years later still discussing this wretched credit crisis and the ranks of the unemployed continue to climb.  If we cannot properly diagnose the problems we cannot find a proper cure.  Thus far, we have failed.…
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Zero Hedge

Walmart Transforming 160 Parking Lots Into Drive-In Movie Theaters

Courtesy of ZeroHedge View original post here.

In May, readers may recall we said social distancing would revive drive-in movie theaters in a post-corona world. And boy, were we right.  

A press release via Walmart on Wednesday (July 1) said, "Walmart is transforming 160 of its store parking lots into contact-f...



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ValueWalk

The "Next Netflix" Has Finally Revealed Itself

By Mauldin Economics. Originally published at ValueWalk.

A sleeping giant tech stock has awoken. It’s already handing out monster gains. And as I’ll show you today, it’s just getting warmed up.

Q2 2020 hedge fund letters, conferences and more

In fact, it won’t be long before this stock is mentioned in the same breath as hall-of-famers like Netflix (NFLX), Facebook (FB), and Google (GOOG). That’s right. The next great tech stock is growing up before our eyes.

I don’t say that lightly. Within a few years, this compan...



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Phil's Favorites

Coronavirus deaths and swelling public sector debt share a data-quality problem

 

Coronavirus deaths and swelling public sector debt share a data-quality problem

Different countries report coronavirus data differently. Shutterstock.com

Courtesy of Marion Boisseau-Sierra, Cambridge Judge Business School

Watching scientists, politicians and journalists struggle to compare national death rates from the coronavirus pandemic, I had an acute case of déjà vu. Though the virus may be novel, the confusion generated by inconsistent data standards is anything but. It’s something I&...



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Biotech/COVID-19

Coronavirus deaths and swelling public sector debt share a data-quality problem

 

Coronavirus deaths and swelling public sector debt share a data-quality problem

Different countries report coronavirus data differently. Shutterstock.com

Courtesy of Marion Boisseau-Sierra, Cambridge Judge Business School

Watching scientists, politicians and journalists struggle to compare national death rates from the coronavirus pandemic, I had an acute case of déjà vu. Though the virus may be novel, the confusion generated by inconsistent data standards is anything but. It’s something I&...



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Chart School

Golds quick price move increases the odds of a correction

Courtesy of Read the Ticker

Every market corrects, maybe profit taking, maybe of allowing those who missed out, to get in!


The current open interest on the gold contract looks to high after a very fast price move, it looks like 2008 may be repeating. A quick flushing out of the weak hands open interest may take place before a real advance in price takes place. The correction may be on the back of a wider sell off of risk assets (either before of after US elections) as all assets suffer contagion selling (just like 2008).

This blog view is a gold price correction of 10% to 20% range is a buying opportunity. Of course we may see  a very minor price correction but a long time correction, a price or time is correction is expected, we shall watch and...

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The Technical Traders

Wild Volatility Continues As US Markets Attempt To Establish New Trend

Courtesy of Technical Traders

We’ve continued to attempt to warn investors of the risks ahead for the US and global markets by generating these research posts and by providing very clear data supporting our conclusions.  Throughout the entire months of May and June, we’ve seen various economic data points report very mixed results – and in some cases, surprise numbers as a result of the deep economic collapse related to the COVID-19 virus event.  This research post should help to clear things up going forward for most traders/investors.

As technical traders, we attempt to digest these economic data factors into technical and price analysis while determining where and what ...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

Nasdaq 100 Relative Strength Testing 2000 Highs

Courtesy of Chris Kimble

The tech bubble didn’t end well. BUT it did tell us that the world was shifting into the technology age…

Since the Nasdaq 100 bottomed in 2002, the broader markets have turned over leadership to the technology sector.

This can be seen in today’s chart, highlighting the ratio of Nasdaq 100 to S&P 500 performance (on a “monthly” basis).

As you can see, the bars are in a rising bullish channel and have turned sharply higher since the 2018 stock market lows. This highlights the strength of the Nasdaq 100 and large-cap tech stocks.

...

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Lee's Free Thinking

These Charts Show COVID 19 Is Spreading in the US and Will Kill the Economy

 

These Charts Show COVID 19 Is Spreading in the US and Will Kill the Economy

Courtesy of  

The COVID 19 pandemic is, predictably, worsening again in much of the US. Only the Northeast, and to a lesser extent some Midwestern states, have been consistently improving. And that trend could also reverse as those states fully reopen.

The problem in the US seems to be widespread public resistance to recommended practices of social distancing and mask wearing. In countries where these practices have been practi...



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Digital Currencies

Blockchains can trace foods from farm to plate, but the industry is still behind the curve

 

Blockchains can trace foods from farm to plate, but the industry is still behind the curve

App-etising? LDprod

Courtesy of Michael Rogerson, University of Bath and Glenn Parry, University of Surrey

Food supply chains were vulnerable long before the coronavirus pandemic. Recent scandals have ranged from modern slavery ...



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Members' Corner

Coronavirus, 'Plandemic' and the seven traits of conspiratorial thinking

 

Coronavirus, 'Plandemic' and the seven traits of conspiratorial thinking

No matter the details of the plot, conspiracy theories follow common patterns of thought. Ranta Images/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Courtesy of John Cook, George Mason University; Sander van der Linden, University of Cambridge; Stephan Lewandowsky...



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Insider Scoop

Economic Data Scheduled For Friday

Courtesy of Benzinga

  • Data on nonfarm payrolls and unemployment rate for March will be released at 8:30 a.m. ET.
  • US Services Purchasing Managers' Index for March is scheduled for release at 9:45 a.m. ET.
  • The ISM's non-manufacturing index for March will be released at 10:00 a.m. ET.
  • The Baker Hughes North American rig count report for the latest week is scheduled for release at 1:00 p.m. ET.
...

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Promotions

Free, Live Webinar on Stocks, Options and Trading Strategies

TODAY's LIVE webinar on stocks, options and trading strategy is open to all!

Feb. 26, 1pm EST

Click HERE to join the PSW weekly webinar at 1 pm EST.

Phil will discuss positions, COVID-19, market volatility -- the selloff -- and more! 

This week, we also have a special presentation from Mike Anton of TradeExchange.com. It's a new service that we're excited to be a part of! 

Mike will show off the TradeExchange's new platform which you can try for free.  

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Mapping The Market

How IPOs Are Priced

Via Jean Luc 

Funny but probably true:

...

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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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