Posts Tagged ‘sentiment’

Is Consumer Confidence a Contrarian Indicator?

Is Consumer Confidence a Contrarian Indicator?

Courtesy of Mish

Retailers Hope For A Busy Christmas As The UK Stays In Recession

On Tuesday economists were surprised when the Consumer Confidence Index Plunged To 46.

The Conference Board’s confidence index slumped to 46, below the lowest forecast in a Bloomberg News survey of economists, from 56.5 in January, a report from the New York- based private research group showed today.

Economists forecast the confidence index would decrease to 55 from a previously reported 55.9 January reading, according to the median of 68 projections in the Bloomberg survey. Estimates ranged from 50.9 to 59.

The Conference Board’s measure of present conditions decreased to 19.4, the lowest since February 1983, from 25.2.

Across the Atlantic, conditions are deteriorating as well. The New York Times has that story in Europe’s Recovery Shows Signs of Stalling.

“Recovery in our largest export market — the euro area — appears to have stalled,” Mervyn A. King, governor of the Bank of England, told a committee in Parliament.

There were disappointing economic reports from other European countries as well Tuesday. French consumer spending on manufactured goods in January experienced its worst decline in two years in part because of the end of a cash-for-clunkers program, while Italian consumer confidence fell this month to its lowest level since July.

New Zealand National Rowing Championships

Belgium’s business sentiment indicator was flat this month instead of the increase that analysts had expected.

A Contrarian Indicator?

Mark Hulbert at MarketWatch thinks that consumer confidence is a contrarian indicator on the basis It’s darkest before the dawn.

According to the Conference Board’s "Present Situation Index," which measures how consumers are feeling about the economy right now, they are even more pessimistic today than they were at the depths of the 2007-2009 bear market. In fact, as analysts have been quick to point out, you have to go back several decades to find another occasion when consumers were this glum about the economy.

Here’s one thing to remember before we get too dejected by this news, however: The last time that the Present Situation Index was as low as it is now was at the end of 1982 and early 1983. Coming as it did at the beginning of a two-decades-long bull market, that was a great time to get into stocks.

As Nathan Rothschild famously once said, the time to buy is when the blood is running in


continue reading


Tags: , ,




Market Sentiment: Is It Really at Bullish Extremes?

Market Sentiment: Is It Really at Bullish Extremes?

Courtesy of Elliott Wave International

At EWI’s Q&A Message Board, readers ask us dozens of questions daily. Here’s an interesting one that several subscribers have recently asked:

In Bob Prechter’s Elliott Wave Theorist, Short Term Update and elsewhere, you say that market sentiment is very bullish right now, which historically has indicated a market top. Is the sentiment really that bullish? I get a different feeling when I look around."

Elliott wave analysis is very visual; we’re all about charts. And often, a single look at a well-made chart can instantly show you what’s really been going on. Take a look at this chart from the December 2 issue of our Mon.-Wed.-Fri. Short Term Update:

stock market bears in hibernation

In the words of Steve Hochberg, the Update’s editor:

We see the bears’ retreat in the CBOE Volatility Index (VIX), which has dropped sharply the past three days to where it is nearly as low as it’s recent November 25 extreme of 20.05. We see it in the 10-day average of NYSE daily volume, which is at its lowest point since the bear-market rally started in March. And we see it in today’s release of the most recent Investors Intelligence Advisors’ Survey. The above chart shows the percentage of stock market bears, which has contracted to 16.7 percent… There are fewer bears now than at the October 2007 stock market peak and still fewer than at the June-July 2007 top in the NYSE a/d line.

By itself, a sentiment extreme — whether pessimistic or optimistic — is not a guarantee of a market reversal. (Nothing is, really: Financial markets exist in the world of probabilities, not certainties.) But couple sentiment measures with a longer-term Elliott wave pattern, and now you have a leg to stand on. 

*****

Elliott Wave International has extended their "downloading deadline" for their free 42-Page eBook, How You Can Identify Turning Points Using Fibonacci. The eBook, created from the $129 two-volume set of the same name, is now available free until December 7, 2009. Go here to download your free eBook.

 


Tags: , , , ,




Strenuously Overbought But …?

Mish discusses his thoughts on the market, drawing a few Elliott Wave patterns towards the end. – Ilene

Strenuously Overbought But …?

strenuous climb up, market overboughtCourtesy of Mish

Inquiring minds are once again reading excellent commentary by John Hussman. Please consider Strenuously Overbought.

Last week, we closed out our modest "anti-hedge" in index call options, which we have carried in the Strategic Growth Fund during recent months, and we moved back to a fully hedged investment stance. I should note that we are not “calling” or “predicting” a market decline in this particular instance. Rather, we are tightening of our defenses because the overall conformation of evidence we observe here has generally not been followed by an acceptable return/risk profile, on average.

My discomfort about strenuously overbought and moderately overvalued conditions overlaps with skepticism about the U.S. economic “recovery,” which appears to be nothing but an artifact of government spending, while intrinsic economic activity remains weak. Stimulus induced “strength” is unlikely to propagate because, as I’ve noted before, economic recoveries are invariably led by expansion in debt-financed forms of spending such as gross domestic investment and durable goods. These classes of spending tend to lead other forms of economic activity by nearly a year, and it is difficult to expect this in an environment of heavy continued deleveraging pressure. Rather than abating, foreclosures and mortgage delinquencies are setting further records (pressured even more by continued net job losses), and we have now hit the point where Alt-A and Option-ARM resets are beginning (after a lull in the reset schedule since March). We know that post-crash markets feature partial recoveries followed by a very extended period of sideways movement. To expect an entirely different result in this instance – to assume that this is a typical post-war recovery and that everything is back to normal – seems hopeful to say the least.

The percentage of bullish investment advisors now rivals that seen at the 2007 peak. Stocks are strenuously overbought. The S&P 500 is overvalued to the extent that we now expect just a 6.6% annual total return over the coming decade (a level that except for the period since the mid-1990′s has corresponded more to bull market peaks than bases for sustained advances). Historically, such combinations of overbought, overvalued, overbullish evidence have generally been unrewarding, so we don’t even need to consider special cases.


continue reading


Tags: , , , , , ,




SOME WARNING SIGNS FOR MR. MARKET

SOME WARNING SIGNS FOR MR. MARKET

Mr. MarketCourtesy of The Pragmatic Capitalist

Courtesy of David Rosenberg:

SOME WARNING SIGNS FOR MR. MARKET

•  The market has gone nowhere over the last three trading days despite what was being construed on bubblevision as unrelenting good news (home prices, house sales, consumer confidence, durable goods orders, Bernanke’s reappointment) — any other time in the last five months, these “green shoots’ would have turned the equity screens green. Could be a sign that a lot of good news is already being discounted.

•  While it is often reported that over 70% of S&P 500 companies beat their 2Q earnings estimates, only 46% did so meaningfully. Not only that, but only 23% significantly beat their top-line revenue projections. See page C2 of the WSJ (The Rally Revenue Forgot).

•  Leading stocks have been seeing reduced trading volumes of late.

•  VIX futures and the put/call ratio on the S&P 500 have shot upwards in the past few sessions.

•  The ECRI leading economic indicator fell 0.4% in the latest week, the first decline in six weeks and only the second falloff in the past eighteen.

•  Sentiment is far too bullish — to an extreme level. A sentiment index quoted in today’s NYT business section is now 89% bullish, the same as it was in October 2007; at the March lows, it was sitting at 2%. See Some Once-Bullish Analysts See an End to Market Rally on page B1 of the Monday NYT.

•  Corporate insiders sold nearly 31 times more stock than they bought in August (TrimTabs data) — the long run average is 7x and it was 2x at the lows (apparently a heck of a buying opportunity at that time).

•  Small-cap stocks are down for back-to-back weeks and Chinese equities are on a four-week losing streak. Finally, the market has turned in the precise same 50% advance over the same 117 time period that it enjoyed coming off the 1929 lows — that rally ended despite all the hype at the time and the market lost more than 50% in the ensuing year.

•  Of course, there are the negative seasonals too — since 1950, the S&P 500 is down 1% in September, on average, and has declined twice as often as it has rallied during the month.

•  The H1N1 flu is a clear obstacle. This


continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , ,




THE 2 BIGGEST RISKS TO THE BULL MARKET

THE 2 BIGGEST RISKS TO THE BULL MARKET

Courtesy of The Pragmatic Capitalist

This is a re-post from an article we wrote for TheStreet.com:

The rally off the March 8th lows has been nothing but spectacular.   In hindsight, it’s clear that investors overreacted to the downside, but as stocks surge more than 50% it’s time to begin pondering whether the current rally is a bit ahead of itself.  Contrary to my bottom call on March 8th when I said it was time to invest in risky assets (a full history of my 2008/9 calls can be found here including our 2008 crash call and March 8 buy call), now is the time to put on your risk management cap on as a number of various threats begin to pop up across the market.    I recently turned near-term bearish on stocks due to 2 primary reasons: sentiment & seasonality.

1)  Sentiment – As I often say, psychology drives markets.  After months of skepticism regarding the rally we are finally beginning to see an overwhelming amount of bullishness.  This is a screaming contrarian indicator.  The latest consumer confidence readings showed a marked jump to 54.1 and bullish sentiment among fund managers has soared to its highest level since 2003:

The latest Merrill Lynch fund managers survey shows an extraordinary jump in optimistic sentiment.   The survey makes up the current psychology of 204 portfolio managers running over $550B in assets.  The report shows a 63% jump in sentiment since July and the highest reading since November of 2003.

After months of short squeezes and failed market declines this optimistic sentiment has begun to eat into one of the fuels of this rally: short sellers.  Recent short sales data shows the lowest readings since the market tanked in early February.  As we lose the short sellers we lose an important driver of higher prices.

BESPOKE THE 2 BIGGEST RISKS TO THE BULL MARKET

Perhaps most important has been the enormous shift in analyst estimates.  After turning bearish in early June, I reversed the position in early July for one reason – earnings.  My analysis led me to believe that estimates were far too low primarily due to the fact that analysts were not accounting for cost cuts.  The estimates have been outrageously low, but now as the consensus begins to believe in a full blown recovery the


continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,




VIX Count

VIX Count

canary in a coal mineCourtesy of Binve at Market Thoughts and Analysis

Continuing along the theme of canaries in the coal mine: I am taking a look at the VIX. Like with my sentiment charts of the CPC, CPCE, and BPSPX, we should see volatility make a low (confidence make a high) around the P2 top.

I had actually not updated my VIX counts for a couple of months and had only been watching it peripherally. Imagine my surprise when I looked at my chart and saw that it broke the long term down trend line, and on top of that, it is now using it as support!

Very ominous for the bulls. My count also already has a bottom in the VIX. And if you think about when that bottom was made, it was in the middle of the strongly trending part of Wave 3 of A. After that, there was been a lot of volatility. The absolute price has stayed in some bands and has been "stair-stepping" up, but there has been a lot of "chatter" in the bands.

I think this is another "X" on the P2 top checklist. So far we have:

- X –    VIX Low
- X –    BPSPX (and other bullish indicators) at higher highs than 2007 peak
- X –    CPC at uber-bullish levels
- X –    Investor Sentiment above 80%
- X –    Economists declaring "end of the recession"
- X –    Analysts upgrading everything
- X –    "Speculative Leader" indices showing weakness / bearish divergence
-    –    Clear end count for P2

…. And almost on that last one. Things are certainly in place.  [Click on charts for larger views] 

*****

Canary in a Coalmine

 


Tags: , ,




Banks, Sentiment and the Long Term Dollar / Equity Correlation

Banks, Sentiment and the Long Term Dollar / Equity Correlation

Courtesy of Binve at Market Thoughts and Analysis 

Interesting Day [Aug. 24], and a potentially important day. Today could be Primary 3 Day!. But instead of me putting up a bunch of charts, counts and indicators of the major indicies (which everybody else is doing and probably better than I would anyways), I wanted to look slightly off the mainstream. Such as last night with A Look At Some of the Asian Markets. I want to look at some more canaries in the coal mine.casino

Financials

And these guys are another canary. Albeit not a very original one. Because everybody watches / trades financials. But most do not do it from a big picture perspective. BAC was a 5-bagger if you picked it off the very bottom in about 5 months. People trade and gamble with financials, people are very emotional and hopeful about them.

This alone should tell you that financials are just another casino play right now. Just like the SSEC (108% off the bottom). Most financials are multi-baggers and the XLF and BKX are up over 100%. And you can sit there and tell me it is because they are healthier or that the strongest have survived …. BS. I still maintain that finanicals are volatile garbage and are the cancer of the economy. And these moves do nothing to dissuade my opinion that this is just speculative casino gambling in these stocks.

And much like the SSEC (a huge casino index), which peaked earlier this month, the casino nature of financials should show weakness ahead of the rest of the markets also. BKX and XLF still made higher highs with the rest of the markets, but good old Goldman Sachs has not been. Did the Goldman Sachs "reign of terror" end on Aug 6th? Stay tuned to find out.

[click on charts for larger images]


Sentiment

Just another look at charts I have shared a few months back. BPSPX notched over the long term resistance line, which is exactly what we expected it to do at the end of P2. So that is another "X" on the checklist for evidence of a P2 top.

Next is a look at the CPC. Option investors were already in uber-bullish territory. And then…
continue reading


Tags: , , , , ,




 
 
 

Kimble Charting Solutions

DAX Index Hits Two 18-Year Support Lines, Creates Large Bullish Reversal

Courtesy of Chris Kimble

Has the DAX index from Germany experience a large decline of late? Yes, it has!

Has the decline broken long-term rising support lines? Not so far!

This chart looks at the DAX index on a monthly basis over the past 25-years. Over the past 6-years, it has traded sideways inside of the blue rectangle at (1).

The decline this year saw the DAX hit two 18-year rising support lines at (2) last month, where a large bullish reversal took place.

Until broken, important support remains in play at (2), which is bullish for this key index....



more from Kimble C.S.

Zero Hedge

Aaand Its Gone... The Biggest Support For Asset Prices

Courtesy of ZeroHedge View original post here.

Authored by Lance Roberts via RealInvestmentAdvice.com,

Since the passage of “tax cuts,” in late 2017, the surge in corporate share buybacks has become a point of much debate. I previously wrote that stock buybacks were setting records over the past couple of years. Jeffery Marc...



more from Tyler

Phil's Favorites

Here's how scientists are tracking the genetic evolution of COVID-19

 

Here's how scientists are tracking the genetic evolution of COVID-19

Why do scientists care about mutations on the coronavirus? Alexandr Gnezdilov Light Painting

Niema Moshiri, University of California San Diego

When you hear the term “evolutionary tree,” you may think of Charles Darwin and the study of the relationships between different species over the span of millions of years.

While the concept of an “evolutionary tree” originated in Darwin’s “...



more from Ilene

Biotech/COVID-19

Here's how scientists are tracking the genetic evolution of COVID-19

 

Here's how scientists are tracking the genetic evolution of COVID-19

Why do scientists care about mutations on the coronavirus? Alexandr Gnezdilov Light Painting

Niema Moshiri, University of California San Diego

When you hear the term “evolutionary tree,” you may think of Charles Darwin and the study of the relationships between different species over the span of millions of years.

While the concept of an “evolutionary tree” originated in Darwin’s “...



more from Biotech/COVID-19

ValueWalk

Activists demand revamp of anti-redlining law

By Anna Peel. Originally published at ValueWalk.

Over 100 California Community Organizations and Leaders Call for Banking Regulators to Stop Planned Revamp of Anti-Redlining Law during COVID19 Crisis

Q1 2020 hedge fund letters, conferences and more

Worker, Housing, and Small Business advocates call on all resources to be dedicated to saving lives and responding to Coronavirus

San Francisco--Amongst an unprecedented public health crisis that threatens hundreds of thousands of lives, as small businesses are shuttered across California and the nation, and as millions file for...



more from ValueWalk

Chart School

The Big Short movie guides us to what is next for the stock market

Courtesy of Read the Ticker

There is nothing new in WallStreet, it is only the players that change. Sometimes a market player or an event gets ahead of the crowd and WallStreet has to play catch up.

Previous Post Dow 2020 Crash Watch Dow, Three strikes and your out!

It is important to understand major WallStreet players do not want to miss out on a money making moves.  







...

more from Chart School

Insider Scoop

Economic Data Scheduled For Friday

Courtesy of Benzinga

  • Data on nonfarm payrolls and unemployment rate for March will be released at 8:30 a.m. ET.
  • US Services Purchasing Managers' Index for March is scheduled for release at 9:45 a.m. ET.
  • The ISM's non-manufacturing index for March will be released at 10:00 a.m. ET.
  • The Baker Hughes North American rig count report for the latest week is scheduled for release at 1:00 p.m. ET.
...

http://www.insidercow.com/ more from Insider

The Technical Traders

Founder of TradersWorld Magazine Issued Special Report for Free

Courtesy of Technical Traders

Larry Jacobs owner and editor of TradersWorld magazine published a free special report with his top article and market forecast to his readers yesterday.

What is really exciting is that this forecast for all assets has played out exactly as expected from the stock market crash within his time window to the gold rally, and sharp sell-off. These forecasts have just gotten started the recent moves were only the first part of his price forecasts.

There is only one article in this special supplement, click on the image or link below to download and read it today!

...

more from Tech. Traders

Members' Corner

10 ways to spot online misinformation

 

10 ways to spot online misinformation

When you share information online, do it responsibly. Sitthiphong/Getty Images

Courtesy of H. Colleen Sinclair, Mississippi State University

Propagandists are already working to sow disinformation and social discord in the run-up to the November elections.

Many of their efforts have focused on social media, where people’s limited attention spans push them to ...



more from Our Members

Digital Currencies

While coronavirus rages, bitcoin has made a leap towards the mainstream

 

While coronavirus rages, bitcoin has made a leap towards the mainstream

Get used to it. Anastasiia Bakai

Courtesy of Iwa Salami, University of East London

Anyone holding bitcoin would have watched the market with alarm in recent weeks. The virtual currency, whose price other cryptocurrencies like ethereum and litecoin largely follow, plummeted from more than US$10,000 (£8,206) in mid-February to briefly below US$4,000 on March 13. Despite recovering to the mid-US$6,000s at the time of writin...



more from Bitcoin

Promotions

Free, Live Webinar on Stocks, Options and Trading Strategies

TODAY's LIVE webinar on stocks, options and trading strategy is open to all!

Feb. 26, 1pm EST

Click HERE to join the PSW weekly webinar at 1 pm EST.

Phil will discuss positions, COVID-19, market volatility -- the selloff -- and more! 

This week, we also have a special presentation from Mike Anton of TradeExchange.com. It's a new service that we're excited to be a part of! 

Mike will show off the TradeExchange's new platform which you can try for free.  

...

more from Promotions

Lee's Free Thinking

Why Blaming the Repo Market is Like Blaming the Australian Bush Fires

 

Why Blaming the Repo Market is Like Blaming the Australian Bush Fires

Courtesy of  

The repo market problem isn’t the problem. It’s a sideshow, a diversion, and a joke. It’s a symptom of the problem.

Today, I got a note from Liquidity Trader subscriber David, a professional investor, and it got me to thinking. Here’s what David wrote:

Lee,

The ‘experts’ I hear from keep saying that once 300B more in reserves have ...



more from Lee

Mapping The Market

How IPOs Are Priced

Via Jean Luc 

Funny but probably true:

...

more from M.T.M.





About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

Learn more About Phil >>


As Seen On:




About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.