Posts Tagged ‘Stephen Roach’

STEPHEN ROACH: QE WON’T WORK

STEPHEN ROACH: QE WON’T WORK

Courtesy of The Pragmatic Capitalist 

At least one analyst out there actually understands how QE works.  Stephen Roach of Morgan Stanley says that QE is one big waste of time.  He understands that global imbalances can’t be resolved with kick the can policies.

Source: CNBC 


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‘Double-Dips Are Not as Infrequent as You Might Think’

‘Double-Dips Are Not as Infrequent as You Might Think’

Courtesy of Michael Panzner at Financial Armageddon 

Morgan Stanley’s Stephen Roach is the featured guest on the Wall Street Journal’s Big Interview, and unlike many of his peers, he relies on facts rather than fantasy in formulating his economic outlook. Given what you and I already know about the reality on the ground, it’s no surprise to find that Mr. Roach is less than sanguine about where things stand:

WSJ: You’ve been warning of a disappointing U.S. recovery, so I’d like to ask you right off the bat: Just how likely do you see the prospects of a double-dip kind of event?

Roach: I give it a higher probability than most — maybe 40% at some point over the next year. We have a weak recovery, weak labor market, weak consumer purchasing power, and a consumer — 70% of the economy — that is still massively overextended in terms of debt; unprepared in terms of savings; and unable to rely to rely on property and credit bubbles to support consumption. So, if you have a disappointing consumer and any kind of an unexpected shock, you can go down again.

Here is the full interview:

 


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Stephen Roach says China’s Housing Boom is Not a Bubble; I say “Nonsense”

Stephen Roach says China’s Housing Boom is Not a Bubble; I say "Nonsense"

Courtesy of Mish 

Stephen Roach does not seem to understand what a bubble is. He makes the same arguments in dismissing China’s property bubble that we heard in the US, regarding "solid demand".

Please consider China’s Housing Market Isn’t Overheating, Roach Says

The property boom in China isn’t a bubble because it’s supported by “solid” demand for residential housing, according to Stephen Roach, chairman of Morgan Stanley Asia Ltd.

While portions of the real-estate market such as high-end apartments are overheating, demand for residential homes will remain robust as rural Chinese migrate to bigger cities, Roach said in a radio interview from Hong Kong with Tom Keene on Bloomberg Surveillance.

“This is just a sliver of the property boom,” Roach said, citing that each year since 2000, between 15 and 20 million people migrate to Beijing, Shanghai, and second- and third-tier cities in mainland China. That’s two and a half New York Cities created annually, he said. “This underpins a huge demand for residential property. This property has not overheated and the demand for this property is very, very solid.”

The nation’s property prices rose 12.4 percent in May from a year earlier, the second-fastest pace on record. China’s banking regulator said today it sees growing credit risks in the nation’s real-estate industry and warned of increasing pressure from non-performing loans.

China’s lawmakers have raised down payment requirements and mortgage rates and restricted loans for multiple-home buyers as they seek to dampen record property price gains. The government’s “decisive” actions in April are working to cool the sections of the housing market that were overheating, according to Roach.

“By all accounts, it looks like the measures are working for now,” he said.

Demand Irrelevant

Flashback 2000: There was enormous demand for internet stocks, pushing up the price and creating a bubble.

Flashback 2005: There was enormous demand for Florida condos. People were camping out overnight and entering lotteries for the right to buy condos.

2010: There is massive demand in Australia and Canada for housing. However that demand is finally showing signs of weakening.

Certainly there is a larger population in China and somehow Roach thinks that proves there is no bubble. It doesn’t.

What Constitutes a Bubble?

In the case of internet stocks, it’s when speculative demand exceeds the fundamentals. The same…
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Stephen Roach on discouraged workers

Stephen Roach on discouraged workers

Courtesy of Tim Iacono at The Mess That Greenspan Made 

After last Friday’s print of 9.7 percent for the unemployment rate, more than a few pundits are calling the 10.1 percent jobless rate seen back in October the high for the cycle. It seems to be way too early to make that call based on the millions of "discouraged" workers who, when they start looking for work again, will suddenly count as "unemployed" again.

Stephen Roach seems to agree, figuring that the real jobless rate today is 11.5 percent.
 

The odds of a double-dip recession are now 40 percent? That’s good to know. There’s been a lot of talk about another downturn for the U.S. economy, but it comes as news to me that they’ve already taken the time to poll economists and that they were this pessimistic.


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ROACH’S 4 REASONS WHY THE ECONOMY REMAINS VULNERABLE

ROACH’S 4 REASONS WHY THE ECONOMY REMAINS VULNERABLE

Courtesy of The Pragmatic Capitalist

Stephen Roach, chairman of Morgan Stanley Asia Ltd. says the global economy remains “vulnerable” despite all the “euphoria.” He outlines his four reasons why the recovery remains vulnerable and why he isn’t jumping on the bull bandwagon. Those reasons are:

1) The financial crisis itself is far from over.

2) The breadth of this global recession was staggering.

3) The demand side of the global economy is likely to be restrained by a protracted pullback of the over-extended American consumer.

4) The supply side of the global economy suffers from massive imbalances, especially China-centric developing Asia.

Full interview follows:

 


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Words from the Wise?

Words from the Wise?

Courtesy of Michael Panzner at Financial Armageddon

I just got back from The Economist‘s "Buttonwood Gathering" in New York and thought I’d share a few of the more interesting (and, in some cases, quite enlightening) quotes (in no particular order) from the movers-and-shakers at the (well attended) conference:

Secretary Tim Geithner, United States Department of the Treasury:

"Generally, we did not do enough." (Referring to the failure to address growing concerns over excessive risk-taking in the period leading up to the financial crisis.) [Editor's note: understatement of the year?]

Stephen Roach, Chairman, Morgan Stanley Asia:

Those who are looking for a "V"-shaped recovery are in for "a rude awakening."

"The imbalances going into the crisis were large to begin with. Now, they are bigger than ever."

George Soros, Chairman, Soros Fund Management:

"Bankers have too much power." (Referring to the hold that Wall Street has over Washington.)

The "globalization of financial markets is built on false premises: namely, that markets can be left to their own devices."

Sheila C. Bair, Chairman, Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation:

"Insured deposits are being used in ways that I don’t like to see."

Wilbur L. Ross Jr., Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, WL Ross & Co.:

People were focused on "risk-ignoring rates of return." (Describing one of the things that went helped bring about the financial crisis.)

If regulators had taken the time to visit a Countrywide Lending office, they would have seen something akin to "a Wall Street boiler room," rather than a bank branch. (Referring to regulator’s unwillingness to go out into the field and see what was really going on during the housing boom.)

"Government is its own systemic risk in the mortgage market."

Lawrence H. Summers, Director of the National Economic Council, The White House:

The root of most financial errors is "when you try to do today what you wished you had done yesterday."

"I can assure you that on Main Street, it is a very different conversation." (Referring to the contrast between the optimism on Wall Street and the more pessimistic mood of those struggling to get by in other parts of the country.)

"It is not the administrations’s view to bribe those who have been part of the problems


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Reflections on “The Last Bear Standing”

Reflections on "The Last Bear Standing"

bearCourtesy of Mish

Bill Bonner is one of my favorite columnists. On Friday he was discussing The Last Bear.

As they say on Wall Street, a rally ends when the last bear gives up. An old friend had been a source of inspiration for tech bears for many years. He suddenly saw the light and gave up in 1999. Shares he had formerly scorned – often dotcoms with no revenue and no business plans – were suddenly added to his own portfolio. This also heralded a big change – the end of the tech bubble. Tech stocks collapsed. Most disappeared. Then, Stephen Roach became vaguely bullish in 2007, after a long period of doubt and misgivings.

Now it is Jim Grant who has changed his mind. A generation of investors has gotten used to Grant’s ‘doom is nigh’ warnings. Now, he says, it’s a boom that is nigh.

What is remarkable about the Grant conversion is that his vision gives off so little heat and light. His WSJ article shillyshallies around; rehearses the history of previous recessions and comes to rest in front of a flickering match: “The deeper the slump, the zippier the recovery.”

But facts are survivors. They will tell whatever tale their interrogators want to hear. As for opinions, after six months of a stock market rally, the once half empty glass has become half full. We predicted it ourselves. But we’ll let Robert Prechter say, ‘I told you so.’ Even before the rally began, Prechter foretold its story:

“Regardless of extent, it should generate feelings of optimism. At its peak, the President’s popularity will be higher, the government will be taking credit for successfully bailing out the economy, the fed will appear to have saved the banking system and investors will be convinced that the bear market is behind us.”

As to Mr. Obama’s popularity, Prechter was wrong. But 4 out of 5 ain’t bad.

turning bullishWhat will happen next, we don’t know. But if we turn bullish on this economy and urge you to buy stocks, it will surely be time to sell them.

Enjoy your weekend,

Bill Bonner
The Daily Reckoning

From Deflation to Inflation

With the above in mind I note with interest Martin Weiss, a prominent deflationist has changed his stance. Please consider From Deflation to Inflation.

Step by step,


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Roach: The west went on a “drunken binge of excess consumption”

Roach: The west went on a “drunken binge of excess consumption”

drunken binge, the FedCourtesy of Edward Harrison at Credit Writedowns

Stephen Roach doesn’t mince words.  He calls monetary policy during the bubble years “reckless and irresponsible” and he thinks politics is thwarting any meaningful regulatory reform, a view I also hold. I think the point of Roach’s attack is that a lot of finger-pointing has been directed at Wall Street and even Main Street. But, policy makers share much of the blame.  This is a point I tried to make in a post “Forget about Goldman” from this past summer.

Moreover, as Roach indicates, the concept that a central planner (which a central bank most certainly is) can allow bubbles to form and then clean up after the mess- is on it’s face absurd. But, clearly the Federal Reserve and other central banks are doing their level best to re-create the conditions which led to a near-financial collapse.

The money quote comes just about 4:45 through the eleven minute clip below:

Central bankers say trust us. We know what we’re doing. I don’t trust them one bit. They got us into this mess in the first place.

As for Asia, Roach sees a bright future. However, he warns that it has risen on the back of an unsustainable export-led macro-policy by selling things to people in the West who can’t afford them.  With continued private-sector deleveraging in the west likely, this dynamic has ended.

(video embedded below)

As an aside, Roach also correctly adds that the recent protectionist tariff administered by President Obama was not the result of tire manufacturers’ lobbying. Four of five of the Chinese importers are subsidiaries of U.S. firms. Obama did this to gain credibility and support from unions, a key Democratic constituency in the health care debate and in the run-up to the mid-term elections.

I should also point out that much of the U.S. trade deficit comes from such arrangements, where a U.S. company imports goods from its own foreign subsidiary.

 


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IT IS LIQUIDITY DRIVING THE MARKET

IT IS LIQUIDITY DRIVING THE MARKET

driving the marketCourtesy of The Pragmatic Capitalist

Guest contribution from Pazzo Mundo:

The economist David Rosenberg makes the headline statement in today’s missive that “It’s not liquidity driving the market”.  Rather than guess at his motivations – let’s have a look at how liquidity is driving the market.

First up, define liquidity as referring to the relative ease with which an asset can be sold.  Typically, selling an asset for cash is the most expedient way to realise an asset’s value.  In a sense, cash is the most liquid of assets (as a store of value its pretty darn good most of the time and everyone is happy to use it as a medium of exchange).  For this reason, cash is at the very heart of the liquidity concept.

When there is an abundance of liquidity for a given asset, selling it can be achieved quickly and with minimum price disturbance to that asset.  When there is an abundance of liquidity in an economy as a whole, there is lots of cash available to buy assets – it is relatively easy to sell assets across the risk spectrum.

From this definition, the impact of liquidity on markets seems straightforward.  To get a sense of how it can be measured, a former roomie of Mr Rosenbeg, Stephen Roach, points to a useful indicator:

My favorite gauge of the quantity dimension of liquidity is the so-called “Marshallian K” — the difference between growth in the money supply and nominal GDP.  In essence, this measures the surplus of money that is not absorbed by the real economy.

When the money supply is growing faster than nominal GDP, then excess liquidity tends to flow to financial assets.  On the flip side, if money supply is growing more slowly than nominal GDP, then the real economy absorbs more available liquidity.

Under this model, asset price inflation will be the result of excess liquidity.  For example have a look at some research from BCA on the correlation of the US$ gold price with the Marshallian K and then as compared to CPI:

pazzo1 IT IS LIQUIDITY DRIVING THE MARKET

Now while David makes the point that the Fed’s most recent pumping of the monetary base has had little impact on broader money aggregates (as bank lending continues to contract at record rates), by taking a step back from the four…
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Stephen Roach: 1-In-3 Chance We’re Screwed

Stephen Roach: 1-In-3 Chance We’re Screwed

Courtesy of Vincent Fernando at Clusterstock

 

 


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Zero Hedge

JPMorgan Makes $1 Billion From Gold Trading After Paying $1 Billion Fine For Manipulating Gold Trading

Courtesy of ZeroHedge View original post here.

This, in a nutshell, is how Wall Street works: just two months after JPMorgan was fined a record $1 billion criminal monetary penalty (to make sure not a single banker would end up going to prison) for rigging the gold and silver markets, Reuters reported that JPM - having clearly "learned" the tools of the gold rigging trade, has earned a record $1 billion in revenue so far in 2020 from trading, storing and financing precious metals, vastly outperforming rival banks.

The math simplified: JPM has spent $1 billion over the l...



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ValueWalk

Surprise in Short Interest - New Research Paper

By Jacob Wolinsky. Originally published at ValueWalk.

We extract the news component of short-selling activity by accounting for important cross-sectional, distributional differences in short interest. The resulting measure of surprise in short interest negatively predicts the cross section of both U.S. and international equity returns. Our results also indicate that this predictability originates from short sellers’ informed trading on mispricing and the market’s underreaction to the news component of short-sale reports. Consistent with the notion of costly arbitrage, the return predictability is stronger among illiquid, volatile stocks and stocks with high information uncertainty, but importantly, unrelated short-selling frictions.

...

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Phil's Favorites

Coronavirus Could Cause Shipping Costs To Rise By Up 15% In 2020

By Jacob Wolinsky. Originally published at ValueWalk.

Managing Shipping Budgets in 2021: The Old Normal, the New Normal, or the Unknown?

As they plan their shipping budgets for the coming year, distributors and retailers are struggling to assess the pandemic-driven changes of 2020. SkyPostal’s A.J. Hernandez suggests a two-sided approach: be as careful as you can, while also being prepared for anything.

Building A Shipping Budget

(Miami, FL) November 23, 2020—While shipping managers would like to see some relief from the shocks and surprises of 2020, there are, says A.J. Hernandez, President and CEO of SkyPostal, Inc., a lot of reasons they’re probably not going to get it. According to a recent survey of industry exp...



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Politics

TRUMP CONCEDES (SORT OF)

 

TRUMP CONCEDES (SORT OF)

Courtesy of Teri Kanefield

The Trump Legal team filed more documents today in the appellate court. I tweeted a bit about how silly they were (let me know if you all want me to march through them). Then this happened:

Trump giving the go-ahead for the transition to get underway was (I believe) the closest he will get to conceding the election. Two amusing things happened. First, Trump tweeted this about 10 minutes after Emily Murphy submitted a letter saying she would move forward, and that she has made her decisions solely on her own and not at anyone’s direction. Looks like Trump wanted people to think that she was, in fact, acting at his direction.

The other amusing part was that Tr...



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Chart School

RTT browsing latest..

Courtesy of Read the Ticker

Please review a collection of WWW browsing results. The information here is delayed by a few months, members get the most recent content.



Date Found: Friday, 12 June 2020, 08:06:43 PM

Click for popup. Clear your browser cache if image is not showing.


Comment: Interesting (2)



Date Found: Saturday, 13 June 2020, 12:27:02 AM

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Comment: Recession Forecasts Time Frame



Date Found: Monday, 15 June 2020, 11:07:52 PM

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Biotech/COVID-19

Why the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine is now a global game changer

 

Why the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine is now a global game changer

Courtesy of Michael Head, University of Southampton

In the long dark tunnel that has been 2020, November stands out as the month that light appeared. Some might see it as a bright light, others as a faint light – but it is unmistakably a light.

On November 9, Pfizer announced the interim results of its candidate vaccine, showing it to be “more than 90% effective” in preventing symptomatic COVID-19 in late-stage human trials. The news was greeted with joy.

A ...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

Transports Sending Strong Bullish Message To Other Dow Indices?

Courtesy of Chris Kimble

Are Transportation stocks about to send a quality bullish message to other Dow indices this month? Sure could be!

This 3-pack looks at the Dow Jones Industrials, Transports, and Utilities indices on a monthly basis.

One week from the end of a month, the DJ Transports are attempting an important bullish breakout at (1). Unless a sharp reversal takes place in the next week, Transports could close out the month at new monthly closing highs!

The Dow is attempting to close at all-time highs this month, while the Dow Utilities Index remains a few percent below 2020 highs....



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Digital Currencies

Dalio Admits "I Might Be Missing Something" As Bitcoin Surges Above $18,000

Courtesy of ZeroHedge

Since the US election, Bitcoin prices (in USD) have surged a stunning 40%, also lurching higher after each vaccine headline hit.

Source: Bloomberg

Getting ever closer to its all-time record high...

Source: Bloomberg

As crypto prices soared overnight, Bridgewater Associates founder Ray Dalio stepped back into the fray, saying in a Twitter thread that “I might be missing something about Bitco...



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Mapping The Market

COVID-19 Forces More Than Half of Asset Management Firms to Accelerate Adoption of Digital Marketing Technology

By Jacob Wolinsky. Originally published at ValueWalk.

There is no doubt that the use of technology to support client engagement initiatives brings both opportunities and threats but this has been brought into sharp focus this year with the COVID-19 pandemic.

The crisis has brought to the fore the need for firms to enable flexibility in client engagement – the expectation that providers will communicate to clients on their terms, at their speed and frequency and on their preferred channels, is now a given. This is even more critical when clients are experiencing unparalleled anxiety from both market conditions and their own personal circumstances.

...

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The Technical Traders

Adaptive Fibonacci Price Modeling System Suggests Market Peak May Be Near

Courtesy of Technical Traders

Our Adaptive Fibonacci Price Modeling system is suggesting a moderate price peak may be already setting up in the NASDAQ while the Dow Jones, S&P500, and Transportation Index continue to rally beyond the projected Fibonacci Price Expansion Levels.  This indicates that capital may be shifting away from the already lofty Technology sector and into Basic Materials, Financials, Energy, Consumer Staples, Utilities, as well as other sectors.

This type of a structural market shift indicates a move away from speculation and towards Blue Chip returns. It suggests traders and investors are expecting the US consumer to come back strong (or at least hold up the market at...



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Lee's Free Thinking

Texas, Florida, Arizona, Georgia - The Branch COVIDIANS Are Still Burning Down the House

 

Texas, Florida, Arizona, Georgia – The Branch COVIDIANS Are Still Burning Down the House

Courtesy of Lee Adler, WallStreetExaminer 

The numbers of new cases in some of the hardest hit COVID19 states have started to plateau, or even decline, over the past few days. A few pundits have noted it and concluded that it was a hopeful sign. 

Is it real or is something else going on? Like a restriction in the numbers of tests, or simply the inability to test enough, or are some people simply giving up on getting tested? Because as we all know from our dear leader, the less testing, the less...



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Insider Scoop

Economic Data Scheduled For Friday

Courtesy of Benzinga

  • Data on nonfarm payrolls and unemployment rate for March will be released at 8:30 a.m. ET.
  • US Services Purchasing Managers' Index for March is scheduled for release at 9:45 a.m. ET.
  • The ISM's non-manufacturing index for March will be released at 10:00 a.m. ET.
  • The Baker Hughes North American rig count report for the latest week is scheduled for release at 1:00 p.m. ET.
...

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Promotions

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Phil will discuss positions, COVID-19, market volatility -- the selloff -- and more! 

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About Phil:

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