Posts Tagged ‘Vitaliy Katsenelson’

QE2 is not only a mistake “it’s criminal” says Vitaliy Katsenelson: Tech Ticker

The Treasury market is rebounding Thursday. Yields have fallen from a six-month high, reached Wednesday, but are still up from where they were earlier in the week. Yields on the 10-year are trading at 3.23% today.

This is not what the Federal Reserve had in mind when the central bank announced the plan to purchase $600 billion in Treasury bonds — a move that was hoped would lower rates and stimulate the U.S. economy.

Of course, there are many critics of the Fed who say the second round of quantitative easing is wrong and even harmful. "The failure of QE2 doesn’t worry me, it’s the success that worries me," says Vitaliy Katsenelson of Investment Management Associates.

"I think it’s criminal," he tells Aaron in the accompanying clip. "They’re forcing people that should not be taking risk to take risk."  The fear is the Fed is repeating its past mistakes — helping to build an asset bubble that will eventually burst with grave consequences.

More here: qe2 is not only a mistake "it’s criminal" says vitaliy katsenelson: Tech Ticker, Yahoo! Finance.


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The case for Pfizer

The case for Pfizer

Courtesy of  Vitaliy Katsenelson, at Contrarian Edge

Pfizer Profits Drop After Pharmacia Charges

I understand why investors don’t want to own Pfizer (PFE); there is little excitement in the stock:

  •  It is down significantly from the Viagra-high it reached in 1998.  Yes, Pfizer is the maker of Viagra, the drug that spawned a slew of commercials that made TV unwatchable (especially if you have little kids who ask you if they or you need this medicine that makes people on TV hug each other, or ask you “What is reptile dysfunction?”).
  • Pfizer’s earnings have not gone anywhere for years.
  • As with almost anything medical-related, Pfizer is exposed to the political risks of Washington DC.
  • Finally, it is facing patent expirations of its major blockbuster drugs like Lipitor ($12 billion of sales) and a few others that will hinder PFE’s future growth for years. 
Viagra pills

There is not much one can do about TV commercials except cancel cable or watch less TV (I did both).  Nor there is not much one can do about the stock-price decline over the last ten years – maybe the only thing to do is learn not to buy hype; after all, Pfizer was trading at over 50 times earnings in the late ’90s. 

I don’t want to dismiss the political risk, but it seems that due to extensive lobbying efforts by pharmaceutical companies, political risk has turned into only a slight inconvenience.  Pharma companies have agreed to $80 billion of price concessions over the next ten years, but at the same time they’ll benefit from a larger customer base, as more people will have access to health insurance.

Instead of being mesmerized by huge drug expirations, we can do the value-investor kind of thing – estimate the impact of drug expirations on PFE’s cash flows and value the stock using discounted cash-flow analysis based on these assumptions. 

So let’s value Pfizer:

No New Drugs Scenario:  At the end of 2009 Pfizer acquired Wyeth (WYE), a large pharmaceutical company.  I’ll address this very important acquisition in a bit, but first, let’s look at Pfizer on a pre-Wyeth basis.  The fewer optimistic assumptions we use, the less likely the future will disappoint us.  Applying this logic, let’s assume that soon after a drug-patent expiration, as the generic version hits the market, revenue…
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Books that will help gain sanity in insane market – Part 2

Courtesy of Vitaliy Katsenelson

I originally wrote this list of recommended books last year; recently I updated and added a few more.  I hope to keep adding to it every year.  It contains six sections: Selling, Think Like an Investor, Behavioral Investing, Economics, Stock Market History, and Books for the Soul.  Due to its length, I divided it into two parts.  You can read part 1 by clicking here

Behavioral Investing

The right temperament is crucial in investing. Being a critical thinker and knowing how to value stocks is important, but it is all a waste if your emotions get the better of you. The following books will help you to recognize the shortcomings of your hard-wiring and help you to devise strategies to deal with it.

Psychology of Investing, by John R. Nofsinger, is short and to the point. You’ll become an expert on behavioral investing in about an hour. Well, not quite, but close.

Why Smart People Make Big Money Mistakes And How To Correct Them, by Gary Belsky and Thomas Gilovich.  This is a fun and easy read. It also addresses how shortcomings in our wiring impact money decisions, like buying cars and stereos.

Your Money and Your Brain, by Jason Zweig, is another selection. I have to admit that the two books above cover many topics in this book (though this one offers new angles and insights) and are likely to be more exciting reads, but Chapter 10 is what makes this book a must-read: it addresses happiness – yes, happiness. Although, as most of us know, money doesn’t buy happiness (unless you are starving or living on the street), money spent on acquisitions – things – brings a burst of happiness that quickly fades away. Think of your level of happiness when you bought the car of your dreams. Money spent on experiences – being – brings a higher utility of happiness. Recollecting experience brings happiness. I plan to reread this chapter at least a couple of times a year. Zweig also provides a list of things you can do that will make you happy, and none of them require you to spend a penny, which is a big positive in today’s economy.

Reminiscences of a Stock Operator, written in 1923 by Edwin Lefevre, tells from a first-person perspective the fictionalized tale of the early years of the great trader…
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The Conclusion: Beating a Dead Horse (to Death)

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Follow-up to Beating a Dead Horse by Vitaliy Katsenelson of Contrarian Edge and Active Value Investing 

The Conclusion: Beating a Dead Horse (to Death)

My “Beating the Dead Horse” article ended with a very insightful conclusion “Need I say more?”  I received a dozen emails that said – you DO need to say more.  So here I am saying more:

What do we take out of this?  The Chinese ascent over last decade has lowered the degree of separation between China and the global economy.  What happens in China doesn’t stay in China (not anymore); it spills over to the rest of the world. 

Today, Chinese economic growth is the force pushing the global economy. The quality of this growth, however, is low as it is predicated on massive (forced) lending and thus unsustainable.  As Chinese growth slows, China will turn from a wind into sails of global economy to its anchor.  The impact will be felt in many, often unsuspected places. 

It will tank the commodity markets, commodity producers and commodity exporting nations.  Let’s take oil, for instance.  As incremental demand from China collapses, oil prices will follow, taking the Russian economy with it, as Russia is for the most part a one-trick-petrochemical-pony.  According to GavKal Research China accounts for 15% of Brazil’s exports (up from 1.5% a decade ago), significantly impacting the economy of that South American nation.

Demand for industrial goods will fall off the cliff.  China consumed a lot of those goods – $550 billion worth annually (also according to GaveKal Research).  So if Caterpillar expects to sell more of its yellow earthmovers to China, it will have put that thought on hold for awhile.  (Side note: CAT’s CEO expects CAT’s earnings “$8 to $10 per share within five years if the world economy recovers”.  Let me put it into a proper context: in 2007-2008 circa when its margins and sales were at all time high, double their historical average, CAT earned about $5.50 a share.  Good luck!)

Finally, Chinese appetite for our fine currency will diminish, driving the dollar lower against the renminbi and boosting our interest rates higher. No more 5% mortgages and 6% car loans.

Identifying bubbles is a lot easier than timing them. …
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Beating a Dead Horse

Beating a Dead Horse

Courtesy of Vitaliy Katsenelson’s ContrarianEdge and Active Value Investing 

“'Beauty Samba' is by my father Naum Katsenelson" - VitaliyI know, I may sound like I’m beating a dead horse – how much printer cartridge can one spill over China?  – but I have a very high burden of proof to overcome.  Let me demonstrate it by this analogy:  Let’s rewind 20 years.  It is 1989 and I am writing that the Japanese economy is on the verge of severe decline.  I’m facing a lot of skepticism.  Most people are calling me crazy and throwing heavy objects at me.  After all, the Japanese are on top of the world.  Their economy has been a consistent grower for decades, with a rate of growth that trumps that of the US and Europe.  Japan has the manufacturing thing nailed – they are simply better and more efficient at it than us. 

Magazines and newspapers swarm with stories about Japan, how hard working they are, how unique their culture is (we of course, feel inferior, as lazy Americans).  Japanese exports significantly exceed their imports, generating huge capital-account surpluses – they are swimming in dollars and buying up America. Every other restaurant in Hawaii serves sushi and menus are in English and Japanese (not Spanish).  I may be exaggerating with the last part, a little, but not much.
 
So, in 1989, who am I to poke holes in Japanese grandness and predict their malaise.  Japan could do no wrong.  Of course, we know how that story played out: a bust of a major banking/real estate bubble, a contracting economy for almost two decades, accompanied by deflation, ballooning debt, etc. 
 
Fast-forward, and China today is where Japan was in the late ’80s, except with the greater political instability that comes with a semi-controlled economy and the lack of a social safety net (read: jobless, hungry people don’t write angry letters, they riot). 
 
china olympics opening ceremonySince China can do nothing wrong, everything I write about it is met with skepticism.  Today China projects to the world a similar image as Japan did in the 1980s.  My personal favorite is the incredible spectacle of the Chinese Summer Olympics opening ceremony: the elegant, wonderfully choreographed performance by fifteen thousand people, the marvels of modern technology (the 500-foot LCD screen comes to mind here), the…
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Are We There Yet? Is the Range-Bound Market Over?

Are We There Yet? Is the Range-Bound Market Over?

Courtesy of Vitaliy Katsenelson at The Contrarian Edge & Active Value Investing

For the next dozen years or so, the U.S. stock market will be a wild roller-coaster ride—setting all-time highs and multi-year lows in the process. While the twists and turns of this ride are still to be written by history, the long-term, sideways “range-bound” trajectory has already been set by the eighteen-year bull market that ended in 2000.

When the dust settles, only those who adapted their investment strategies to this range-bound market will have captured any meaningful profits. This is how I started my book Active Value Investing: Making Money in Range-Bound Markets (Wiley, 2007). The following presentation/speech answers the question: Are we there yet? Is the Range-Bound Market Over? (okay, two questions)

Here is a link to the presentation/speech of my book. This presentation/speech almost qualifies as a second (free) edition of the first part of my book – the part that explains why we are likely suffering through a range-bound market.  I updated the data; found a better way to explain old and new topics; changed my mind on some things; and answered questions that have been raised by readers.   I have to warn you this PDF is 20 pages long.  However, a lot of space is consumed by charts and tables thus don’t let the size scare you.  Kill some trees, don’t kill your eyes – print it. 

I hope you enjoy this and more importantly find it beneficial.  You are welcome to share it with your friends (and enemies). 

 

Vitaliy N. Katsenelson, CFA, is a portfolio manager/director of research at Investment Management Associates in Denver, Colo., and he teaches a graduate investment class at the University of Colorado at Denver. He is the author of "Active Value Investing: Making Money in Range-Bound Markets" (Wiley 2007).  To receive Vitaliy’s future articles my email, click here.

 


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Zero Hedge

"I Was Wrong. And I Am Sorry": Bloomberg Apologizes To Black Megachurch For 'Stop And Frisk'

Courtesy of ZeroHedge View original post here.

As Michael Bloomberg weighs a bid for the White House next year, the former New York mayor told the congregation at a 'black megachurch' on Sunday that he's sorry for his support of the city's controversial "stop-and-frisk" program which targeted a disproportionate number of blacks and Latinos.

"I was wrong. And I am sorry," Bloomberg said at the Christian Cultural Center in Brooklyn, pandering to the black vote.

In 2013, a federal judge who ...



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Phil's Favorites

Tesla's business strategy is not chaotic - it's brilliant

 

Tesla's business strategy is not chaotic – it's brilliant

Courtesy of Nathan Furr, INSEAD

Few companies have attracted as much praise, derision, scepticism and enthusiasm as Telsa Motors and its founder Elon Musk. Having interviewed Elon Musk and the Tesla leadership as part of my research, one of the questions I’m asked most frequently is: how can you make sense of Tesla’s wild strategies? The latest example is the move to create a “Gigafactory” for car batteries just outside Berlin.

Part of the challenge in understanding Tesla&...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

New York Stock Exchange Double Topping or Sending A Strong Bullish Message?

Courtesy of Chris Kimble

A very broad index is testing last year’s highs, as monthly momentum is creating lower highs? Which indicator is more important, price or momentum?

This chart looks at the New York Stock Exchange Index (NYSE) on a monthly basis over the past 15-years.

The index peaked in January of 2018, as momentum was the highest since the peak in 2007.

The rally off the lows around Christmas last year, has the index testing the highs of January 2018. While the rally has taken place over the past 12-months, lofty momentum has created a series of lower highs.

Can you believe th...



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Insider Scoop

10 Biggest Price Target Changes For Tuesday

Courtesy of Benzinga

  • UBS raised AbbVie Inc (NYSE: ABBV) price target from $79 to $96. AbbVie shares closed at $88.73 on Monday.
  • JP Morgan lowered the price target for Intelsat SA (NYSE: I) from $22 to $9. Intelsat shares closed at $8.03 on Monday.
  • DA Davidson boosted the price target on Okta Inc (NASDAQ: OKTA) from $131 to $135. Okta closed at $121.15 on Monday.
  • Stifel lifted the price target for Leggett & Platt, Inc. (NYSE: ...


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Lee's Free Thinking

NY Department of Welfare Announces Increased Subsidies for Primary Dealers, Thank God!

 

NY Department of Welfare Announces Increased Subsidies for Primary Dealers, Thank God!

Courtesy of , Wall Street Examiner

Here’s today’s press release (11/14/19) from the NY Fed verbatim. They’ve announced that they will be making special holiday welfare payments to the Primary Dealers this Christmas season. I have highlighted the relevant text.

The Open Market Trading Desk (the Desk) at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York has released the schedule of repurchase agreement (repo)...



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The Technical Traders

VIX Warns Of Imminent Market Correction

Courtesy of Technical Traders

The VIX is warning that a market peak may be setting up in the global markets and that investors should be cautious of the extremely low price in the VIX. These extremely low prices in the VIX are typically followed by some type of increased volatility in the markets.

The US Federal Reserve continues to push an easy money policy and has recently begun acquiring more dept allowing a deeper move towards a Quantitative Easing stance. This move, along with investor confidence in the US markets, has prompted early warning signs that the market has reached near extreme levels/peaks. 

Vix Value Drops Before Monthly Expiration

When the VIX falls to levels below 12~13, this typically v...



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Biotech

Why telling people with diabetes to use Walmart insulin can be dangerous advice

Reminder: We are available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

Why telling people with diabetes to use Walmart insulin can be dangerous advice

A vial of insulin. Prices for the drug, crucial for those with diabetes, have soared in recent years. Oleksandr Nagaiets/Shutterstock.com

Courtesy of Jeffrey Bennett, Vanderbilt University

About 7.4 million people ...



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Chart School

Dow Jones cycle update and are we there yet?

Courtesy of Read the Ticker

Today the Dow and the SP500 are making new all time highs. However all long and strong bull markets end on a new all time high. Today no one knows how many new all time highs are to go, maybe 1 or 100+ more to go, who knows! So are we there yet?

readtheticker.com combine market tools from Richard Wyckoff, Jim Hurst and William Gann to understand and forecast price action. In concept terms (in order), demand and supply, market cycles, and time to price analysis. 

Cycle are excellent to understand the wider picture, after all markets do not move in a straight line and bear markets do follow bull markets. 



CHART 1: The Dow Jones Industrial average with the 900 period cycle.

A) Red Cycle:...

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Digital Currencies

Is Bitcoin a Macro Asset?

 

Is Bitcoin a Macro Asset?

Courtesy of 

As part of Coindesk’s popup podcast series centered around today’s Invest conference, I answered a few questions for Nolan Bauerly about Bitcoin from a wealth management perspective. I decided in December of 2017 that investing directly into crypto currencies was unnecessary and not a good use of a portfolio’s allocation slots. I remain in this posture today but I am openminded about how this may change in the future.

You can listen to this short exchange below:

...



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Mapping The Market

How IPOs Are Priced

Via Jean Luc 

Funny but probably true:

...

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Members' Corner

Despacito - How to Make Money the Old-Fashioned Way - SLOWLY!

Are you ready to retire?  

For most people, the purpose of investing is to build up enough wealth to allow you to retire.  In general, that's usually enough money to reliably generate a year's worth of your average income, each year into your retirement so that that, plus you Social Security, should be enough to pay your bills without having to draw down on your principle.

Unfortunately, as the last decade has shown us, we can't count on bonds to pay us more than 3% and the average return from the stock market over the past 20 years has been erratic - to say the least - with 4 negative years (2000, 2001, 2002 and 2008) and 14 positives, though mostly in the 10% range on the positives.  A string of losses like we had from 2000-02 could easily wipe out a decades worth of gains.

Still, the stock market has been better over the last 10 (7%) an...



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Promotions

Free eBook - "My Top Strategies for 2017"

 

 

Here's a free ebook for you to check out! 

Phil has a chapter in a newly-released eBook that we think you’ll enjoy.

In My Top Strategies for 2017, Phil's chapter is Secret Santa’s Inflation Hedges for 2017.

This chapter isn’t about risk or leverage. Phil present a few smart, practical ideas you can use as a hedge against inflation as well as hedging strategies designed to assist you in staying ahead of the markets.

Some other great content in this free eBook includes:

 

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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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