Guest View
User: Pass: | become a member
Author Archive for Zero Hedge

Overview Of Our Energy Modeling Problem

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by Gail Tverberg via Our Finite World blog,

We live in a world with limits, yet our economy needs growth. How can we expect this scenario to play out? My view is that this problem will play out as a fairly near-term financial problem, with low oil prices leading to a fall in oil production. But not everyone comes to this conclusion. What were the views of early researchers? How do my views differ?

In my post today, I plan to discuss the first lecture I gave to a group of college students in Beijing.

A PDF of it can be found here: 1. Overview of Energy Modeling Problem. A MP4 video is available as well on my Presentations/Podcasts Page.

Many Limits in a Finite World

We live in a world with limits. These limits are not just energy limits; they come in many different forms:

2 We are reaching limits in many ways

All these limits work together. We can work around these limits, but the workarounds are higher cost–for example, substituting less polluting energy resources for more polluting energy resources, or extracting lower grade ores instead of high-grade ores. When lower grade ores are used, we need to process more waste material, raising costs because of greater energy use. When population rises, we must change our agricultural approaches to increase food production per acre cultivated.

The problem we reach with any of these workarounds is diminishing returns. We can keep increasing output, but doing so requires disproportionately more inputs of many kinds (including human labor, mineral resources, fresh water, and energy products) to produce the same quantity of output. This creates higher costs, and can lead to financial problems. This phenomenon is one of the major things that a model of a finite world should reflect.

Economists Views

Economists developed their views of the economy long ago, when limits seemed to be far in the distance. Thus, the models they built do not reflect the expected impact of limits. They are missing variables that would be needed to adjust for changes in the economy’s behavior as limits are reached.

3 Economists put together models

4 Economy will adapt

The story in Slides 3 and 4 tends to be true if we are far from limits, but is it really true when we are close to limits? Perhaps diminishing returns as we approach limits changes the results.

5 What is the real story
continue reading





Overseas Investors Have “Little Appetite” For Chasing Chinese Mania: JPM

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

To be sure, we’ve had our share of laughs at the expense of China’s margin-fueled equity mania. First there was the realization that more than 4 million new stock trading accounts were created in China last month alone — the country is now adding nearly that many each week. Then we discovered that if statistics are to be trusted, around one in three of those millions of new accounts likely belongs to someone with an elementary school education or less. Finally, we learned that the rally has minted an army of day trading housewives, security guards, and most recently, banana salesmen who last Monday traded so much that they literally overwhelmed the Shanghai Exchange’s volume-tracking software.

But not everyone thinks it’s a veritable tulip mania, just ask HSBC’s head of China equity strategy Steven Sun who “wouldn’t say it’s a bubble,” or Citi who figures turnover in Hong Kong could double from here boosting exchange operator HKEx’s bottom line by 40% in the process. So against this backdrop we wondered: are foreign investors as enthusiastic about the prospects for a continuation of the rally in Asia? 

The answer, it turns out, is no. Here’s JPM:

How are investors positioned in China? Chinese equities continued to rally this week driven by Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect program flows. The Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect program, which allows investors in each market to trade shares on the other market, was launched on Nov 17th 2014, triggering a wave of inflows and speculation into the Chinese equity market initially and the Hong Kong equity market more recently. Figure 7 shows the cumulative Southbound and Northbound flow since Nov 17th. Both flows accelerated over the past week boosting the Chinese and the Hong Kong equity market. Another evidence of domestic support to Chinese equities comes from the continued opening of new trading accounts by mainland traders. The Chinese Securities Depository and Clearing Corporation reports the opening of new accounts in the stock market every week. Weekly account openings reached a new historical high with 3.3 million account openings last week alone. A record 14 million accounts opened so far this year. These account openings suggest that the speculative wave that the Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect program triggered within China is currently accelerating.  

What about overseas investors? The


continue reading





The Fed Lives In The Past

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by Dominique Dassault via GlobalSlant.com,

No Contemporary Thinking At The Fed

The picture of this very old telephone reminds of our “esteemed” Federal Reserve. They really seem incapable of any modern thought. Their parallels to, and fears of, the Great Depression [Former Chair Bernanke], seem to drive 2009-2015 monetary policy. It reminds me of incredibly stale thinking… sort of like their incredibly stale personalities. I suppose it’s a good match for them but not for the citizens of the world subjected to their currently ineffective and intellectually lazy policies… rooted in very ancient [just like most of them] history. Currency debasement goes back thousands of years i.e. the Romans debased their currency by lowering the content of silver in their coins.

Of course plenty can be learned from history. Frankly, I love history. But, remember, things do change…like the economy. Every cycle is akin to a fingerprint…completely unique…and requires unique solutions along with some “tried and true” ideas. Yet the policies of Bernanke and his mini-me [Yellen] seem almost entirely based on Bernanke’s obsession [and PhD thesis] with the “Depression”.

Now I am not going to list all of the differences in the economies of the 1930’s with the early 21st century. But just look at that picture up above and now think about the iPhone 6. Obviously…much different along with so many other things. And the changes are obviously MASSIVE.

Unfortunately, the members of The Fed just cannot determine why the current economy [the present dilemma is low wages and low inflation] is not accelerating like the old textbooks and intellectual “papers”, they frequently reference, say they should… given their unwavering commitment to both currency debasement and financial asset purchases. Frequently they point to the “tight” monetary policies of the mid to late 1930’s as an inhibitor to that period’s economic growth and, therefore, the exact opposite ought to be today’s remedy. That may be true…or not…but should that really be the driving force behind their easy money policies of 2009-2014…as it seems to be? They have to rationalize it somehow and this “dated” policy point seems to be the convenient “ration”.

My response to them is…Really….That’s All You Have. The 1930’s as a model for today’s economy along with Roman-esque currency dilution. All of your Ivy League educations and these are…
continue reading





Germany Prepares For “Plan B”, Says Greece Would “Need Not Only A Third Bailout, But Fourth, Fifth Or Even More”

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

It has been a very disturbing 24 hours for Greece.

It all started during yesterday’s surprisingly short, just one hour long Eurozone finmin meeting in Riga, where Yanis Varoufakis not only got the most “hostile” reception yet being called “a time-waster, gambler, and amateur“, but for the first time one minister openly said that maybe it was time governments prepared for the plan B of a Greek default. This happened after Jeroen Dijsselbloem slammed the door on Varoufakis’ proposal for early cash after partial reforms.

“A comprehensive and detailed list of reforms is needed,” Dijsselbloem told a news conference following a meeting in Riga. “A comprehensive deal is necessary before any disbursement can take place … We are all aware that time is running out.”

And so, what was once anathema, namely the official hints that a Grexit is being contemplated at the highest ranks, has now become almost commonplace, courtesy of the backstop provided by the ECB’s QE, which has lulled everyone into a sense of calm because somehow the hope has been kindled that the ECB (which is rapidly running out of government bonds to buy) can offset the realization that what was once an “unbreakable union” is suddenly not only breakable, but no longer a union. As such the trillions in deposit outflows that will sweep the periphery are somehow to be ignored because, well, “Draghi.”

This continued earlier today, when none other than German Finance Minister Schaeuble hinted that Berlin was preparing for a possible Greek default, drawing a parallel with the secrecy of German reunification plans in 1989.

As Reuters reports, at a briefing with reporters after a tense meeting of euro zone finance ministers on Greece on Friday, Schaeuble was asked if euro zone finance ministers were working on a “Plan B” in case negotiations on funding with cash-strapped Athens fail.

“You shouldn’t ask responsible politicians about alternatives,” Schaeuble answered, adding one only need to use one’s imagination to envisage what could happen.

He indicated that if he were to answer in the affirmative that ministers were working on a Plan B — what to do when Greece runs out of money and cannot pay back its debt — he could trigger panic.

To explain his position, he drew a parallel with the secrecy that


continue reading





Gold, The SDR, & BRICS

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by Alasdair Macleod via GoldMoney.com,

Last Monday there was a meeting in Washington hosted by the Official Monetary and Financial Institutions Forum (OMFIF) to discuss the future relationship, if any, of gold with the Special Drawing Rights (SDR).

Also on the agenda was the inclusion of the Chinese renminbi, which seems certain to be included in the SDR basket in this year’s revision, assuming that the United States doesn’t try to block it.

This is not the first time the subject has come up. OMFIF’s chairman, Lord Desai wrote a paper about it after the last Washington meeting on gold and the SDR exactly four years ago. The inclusion of the renminbi in the SDR was rejected in 2010 because of inadequate liquidity and is due to be reconsidered this year.

Desai pointed out in his paper that there are difficulties when it comes to including gold, because (and I think this is what he was trying to say) none of the SDR’s paper constituents are convertible into gold, but gold’s inclusion in the SDR would make them convertible through the back door. However, Desai seemed keen to re-examine the case for gold.

It should be pointed out that if gold is included in SDRs the arrangement cannot be long-lasting so long as the major central banks insist on printing money as an economic cure-all. However, China’s position with respect to gold and her own currency could be a different matter.

The Chinese government has almost certainly accumulated large amounts of gold yet to be included in her reserves, and she has also encouraged her own citizens to own gold as well. We can therefore be certain that China sees a monetary role for gold while at the same time she is pushing for the renminbi to be included in the SDR basket. There is no doubt, if you read the IMF papers from the last SDR review in 2010 that the renminbi does now fulfil the criteria for inclusion today. So the question then is will the advanced nations, which dominate the IMF’s membership, permit the renminbi’s inclusion, and will the US, which has dragged its heels on giving China and the other BRICS nations a greater shareholding in the IMF, relent and permit these reforms, which were accepted by the other…
continue reading





Number Of Companies Beating Revenue Estimates Hits Lowest Level In Two Years

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Last Wednesday, some ostensibly serious people talked with some openly unserious people about “obsessive” corporate buybacks when Moody’s head of leveraged finance Christina Padgett, told CNBC that her “concern would be—if you think about how a company should position itself for further growth, you want to think of them as taking the cash they do have and using it to invest in something that generates growth.” 

By “growth,” Padgett was of course not talking about artificially growing EPS or growing executives’ stock price-linked compensation, but rather about growing productive capacity via capex (a term which is now a four letter word in more ways than one). Why would you not want to spend on productive capacity if you’re a company? Well it’s pretty simple: in the short-term, buybacks are a great way of driving up stock prices and making the bottom line look better than it otherwise would (and EPS beats are a great way of securing further stock price gains).

If you don’t believe us, just ask Barclays who, in a hilarious note from last month, spent 12 pages explaining that after extensive research, analysts had discovered that buying back shares is more effective at boosting stock prices in the short-run than is capex spending. Here’s more:

We find that the stocks of companies that invest in capital expenditures perform worse than the stocks of companies that repurchase their shares. In summary, capex is higher than ever, but it is not rewarding shareholders…

We created factors that rank companies based on their relative spending on capex, dividends, and share repurchases. Overall, these factors show us that the stocks of companies that invested a large portion of cash flow in capital expenditures performed significantly worse than companies that instead returned capital to shareholders through buybacks.

So what you’re saying is that buying billions of dollars worth of shares is better for stock prices in the short-run than investing in future productivity? You don’t say. Of course the contention that “capex is higher than ever” is slightly misleading because while it may be at its highest level on record in absolute terms, a look at the following charts pretty clearly indicates that buybacks have the momentum. 

In any event, buybacks may be very effective at propping up stock prices and
continue reading





Hundreds Dead After Devastating Nepal Earthquake Topples Structures, Starts Avalanches

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

A little over four years after the devastating Japanese earthquake led to a tsunami that triggered the biggest nuclear disaster since Chernobyl, overnight Asia was once again the epicenter of a massive, 7.9 magnitude earthquake, this time not on the Pacific Rim but deep in the Himalayan mountain range, striking the small country of Nepal and sending tremors deep in Northern India, resulting in at least 449 deaths, countless injured, toppling a 19th-century tower in the capital Kathmandu and triggering avalanches on Mount Everest.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake, initially measured at 7.7 but upgraded to 7.9 magnitude, struck 80 km (50 miles) east of Pokhara. It was only 2 km deep. 

According to Reuters, this was the worst quake to hit the impoverished Himalayan nation in 81 years. The tremor was so strong it caused damage in neighboring Indian states and Bangladesh. The quake was shallow, intensifying the amount of energy released over a relatively small area.

Reuters further reports that the death toll had reached 449 in Nepal according to an initial police estimate, most from the Kathmandu Valley. There was little information coming from the outlying areas of the mountainous country and helicopters were circling overheard to get a better sense of the damage.

“Hundreds of people are feared dead and there are reports of widespread damage to property. The devastation is not confined to some areas of Nepal. Almost the entire country has been hit,” said Krishna Prasad Dhakal, deputy chief of mission at Nepal’s Embassy in New Delhi.

The following photos from the scene of the incident confirm the extent of the devastation.


continue reading





One Last Look At The Real Economy Before It Implodes – Part 6: Solutions

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by Brandon Smith via Alt-Market.com, (click here for Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, and Part 5)

All problems, all crises, have at least one solution, if not many solutions. There is no such thing as an unwinnable scenario. Some may not be smart enough or courageous enough to see it, but the solution is always there, waiting to be discovered. The only fight that cannot be won is the fight in which the enemy makes all the rules and we foolishly abide by those rules. Life is not a game of chess, and a man can choose to be more than a pawn anytime he has the guts to do so.

In the past, I have likened the liberty movement to a rebellion against not just tyrants but the game itself – a group of people willing to walk away from the chess board and make their own rules. I stand by that assertion. However, simply walking away is not enough; we must also be willing to take actions that will destroy the game entirely.

In order to accomplish this task, any rebellion against corruption of power must be self-critical – more self-critical of its own weaknesses than opposing propagandists could ever be. Most of our problems as a society are being caused by a relatively small number of elitists, but we will never be able to undo these problems without understanding our weaknesses as much as the enemy’s weaknesses. In this final installment of my six-part series, I will talk about REAL solutions to the inevitable economic implosion in front of us, but I will also discuss the shortcomings of the liberty movement as an obstacle to the success of those solutions.

Perhaps the most detrimental of weaknesses within the Liberty Movement is a propensity of some to demand action by others before they take action themselves.  Not all solutions require a synchronized mass movement led by top-down leadership.  Often the best solutions are implemented by individuals and small groups within the local sphere.  One man alone may not be able to change the entire world, but each individual can change the immediate world around him in smaller ways each day.  Activists need to stop concerning themselves with what everyone else is doing and worry…
continue reading





China Could Face “Sharp” Rise In Capital Outflows If Stocks, Economy Lose Momentum

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

We’ve written quite a bit over the past two months about capital outflows from China. Last week for instance, we documented how the country saw its fourth consecutive quarter of outflows in Q1, bringing the 12 month running total to some $300 billion. Why, beyond the obvious, is this a problem for China? Because pressure is mounting to devalue the yuan as the currency’s peg to the recently strong dollar is becoming costly for the country’s export-driven economy. 

Here’s Soc Gen’s Albert Edwards on the subject:

In the current deflationary environment the Chinese authorities simply can no longer tolerate the continued appreciation of their real exchange rate caused by the dollar link.

And from Barclays:

Amid slowing inflation and rising outflows, the costs of limiting CNY weakness are growing – including the unintended effect of placing more stress on CNY market liquidity and interest rates, rendering liquidity easing efforts less effective.

And here is how we summed up the situation last month:

China is suddenly finding itself in an unprecedented position: it is losing the global currency war, and in a “zero-sum trade” world, in which global commerce and trade is slowly (at first) declining, and in which everyone is desperate to preserve or grow their piece of the pie through currency devaluation, China has almost no options.

At issue is the fact that expectations about the direction of the yuan may be contributing to capital outflows and any indication on the part of Beijing that devaluation is in the cards could exacerbate the problem. Now, data from SAFE suggests nearly $24 billion left China in March alone. Here’s more, via Bloomberg:

Here’s another Chinese puzzle. Economic growth, while slowing, is still 7 percent and the stock market is on a tear. Yet money is leaving the country.

That’s a turnaround for an economy that’s been a magnet for foreign capital during the boom years of the past decade. Why the outflow? A property bust, squeezed corporate profits and the end of a multi-year currency upswing are giving investors fewer reasons to pile in. At the same time, President Xi Jinping’s crackdown on corruption gives more reasons for the nation’s rich to squirrel some of their wealth abroad.

All of this is happening as China moves ahead with


continue reading





11 Signs That We Are Entering The Next Phase Of The Global Economic Crisis

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by Michael Snyder via The Economic Collapse blog,

Well, the Nasdaq finally did it.  It has climbed all the way back to where it was at the peak of the dotcom bubble.  Back in March 2000, the Nasdaq set an all-time record high of 5,048.62.  On Thursday, after all these years, that all-time record was finally eclipsed.  The Nasdaq closed at 5056.06, and Wall Street greatly rejoiced.  So if you invested in the Nasdaq at the peak of the dotcom bubble, you are just finally breaking even 15 years later.  Unfortunately, the truth is that stocks have not been soaring because the U.S. economy is fundamentally strong.  Just like the last two times, what we are witnessing is an irrational financial bubble.  Sometimes these irrational bubbles can last for a surprisingly long time, but in the end they always burst.  And even now there are signs of economic trouble bubbling to the surface all around us. 

The following are 11 signs that we are entering the next phase of the global economic crisis…

#1 It is being projected that half of all fracking companies in the United States will be “dead or sold” by the end of this year.

#2 The rig count just continues to fall as the U.S. oil industry implodes.  Incredibly, the number of rigs in operation in the United States has fallen for 19 weeks in a row.

#3 McDonald’s has announced that it will be closing 700 “poor performing” restaurants in 2015.  Why would McDonald’s be doing this if the economy was actually getting better?

#4 As I wrote about the other day, we could be right on the verge of a Greek debt default.  In fact, we learned on Thursday that the Greek government has been “running on empty” for months…

Greece warned it will go bankrupt next week after failing to stump up enough cash to pay millions of public sector workers and its international debts.

Deputy finance minister Dimitras Mardas set alarm bells ringing yesterday when he declared the country had been ‘running on empty’ since February.

With a debt repayment deadline looming on


continue reading





 
 
 

Zero Hedge

Overview Of Our Energy Modeling Problem

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by Gail Tverberg via Our Finite World blog,

We live in a world with limits, yet our economy needs growth. How can we expect this scenario to play out? My view is that this problem will play out as a fairly near-term financial problem, with low oil prices leading to a fall in oil production. But not everyone comes to this conclusion. What were the views of early researchers? How do my views differ?

In my post today, I plan to discuss the first lecture I gave to a group of college students in Beijing.

A PDF of it can be found here: ...



more from Tyler

Chart School

Price waves that signal market direction

Courtesy of Read the Ticker.

Question: Do price waves answer the Continuation or Reversal question?More from RTT TvAnswer: Yes when you understand Wyckoff logic, more so if you understand Richard Wyckoff law off 'Effort vs Results' and how it supports the Richard Wyckoff law of 'Supply and Demand'.

AMZN price chart with waves colored (the daily price waves are the same formula as PnF wave/bar calculation below, allows sync of price action).

Click for popup. Clear your browser cache if image is not showing.

Auto PnF chart from our Swing Pop out charts.

Click for popup. Clear your browser cache if image is not showing.

NOTE: readtheticker.com does allow users to load ...

more from Chart School

Phil's Favorites

News You Can Use, 4-24-15 P.M.

At $50, This Fake Apple Watch Offers Features the Real One Lacks (Bloomberg)

In Shenzhen's famous Huaqiangbei electronics shopping district, you won't need to stand in any lines or make an appointment for these smartwatches.

At 299 yuan—that's less than $50—you can pick up a smartwatch that looks quite similar to Apple's own creation, complete with replica Digital Crown and touch screen. Like the Cupertino original that went on sale today for seven times the price, the generic offering spotted in this bustling Chinese city features an activity tracker, chat apps, Web browser, and Bluetooth connectivity. A brief demo unveiled shortcomings in the browser with only the text loading on screen.

...



more from Ilene

All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: David is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

more from David

Kimble Charting Solutions

King Dollar slipping below support, say Joe Friday

Courtesy of Chris Kimble.

CLICK ON CHART TO ENLARGE

King Dollar has been on a role since last summer, up over 20% in less than a year. When looking back on the US$, the rally has been rare and nearly historic. Majority of the rally took place inside the steep rising channel above. Over the past month the US$ might have put in a double top. Over the past few days, the US$ has slipped a little below rising support at red arrow above.

CLICK ON CHART TO ENLARGE

As you can see from the table abo...



more from Kimble C.S.

Digital Currencies

Why Bitcoin's male domination will be its downfall

Here's an interesting argument by Felix Salmon, although I think he is taking two correct observations and mistakenly attributing a cause-and-effect relationship to them: Bitcoin is going nowhere because women are not involved.

More likely, in my opinion, women are not involved in bitcoin because bitcoin is going nowhere (and they know it). Or maybe, simply, bitcoin is going nowhere and women are not involved. 

Why Bitcoin's male domination will be its downfall 

By Felix Salmon

Nathaniel Popper’s new book, Digital Gold, is as close as you can get to being the definitive account of the history of Bitcoin. As its subtitle proclaims, the book tells the story of the “misfits” (the first generation of hacker-l...



more from Bitcoin

OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of April 20th, 2015

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



more from OpTrader

Sabrient

Sector Detector: Earnings and GDP temporarily take investor spotlight off the Fed

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

As we get into the heart of earnings season and anticipate the GDP report for Q1, the investor spotlight has been taken off the Federal Reserve and timing of its first interest rate hike, at least temporarily. Even though Q1 economic growth will undoubtedly look weak, the future remains bright for the U.S economy – even though many multinationals will struggle with top-line growth due to the strong dollar – and any near-term selloff resulting from weak economic or earnings news should be bought yet again in expectation of better results for the balance of the year. High sector correlations remain a concern, reflectin...



more from Sabrient

Promotions

Watch the Phil Davis Special on Money Talk on BNN TV!

Kim Parlee interviews Phil on Money Talk. Be sure to watch the replays if you missed the show live on Wednesday night (it was recorded on Monday). As usual, Phil provides an excellent program packed with macro analysis, important lessons and trading ideas. ~ Ilene

 

The replay is now available on BNN's website. For the three part series, click on the links below. 

Part 1 is here (discussing the macro outlook for the markets) Part 2 is here. (discussing our main trading strategies) Part 3 is here. (reviewing our pick of th...

more from Promotions

Market Shadows

Kimble Charts: South Korea's EWY

Kimble Charts: South Korea's EWY

By Ilene 

Chris Kimble likes the iShares MSCI South Korea Capped (EWY), but only if it breaks out of a pennant pattern. This South Korean equities ETF has underperformed the S&P 500 by 60% since 2011.

You're probably familiar with its largest holding, Samsung Electronics Co Ltd, and at least several other represented companies such as Hyundai Motor Co and Kia Motors Corp.

...



more from Paul

Mapping The Market

S&P 500 Leverage and Hedges Options - Part 2

Courtesy of Jean-Luc Saillard.

In my last post (Part 1 of this article), I looked at alternative ETFs that could be used as hedges against the corrections that we have seen during that long 2 year bull run. Looking at the results, it seems that for short (less than a month) corrections, a VIX ETF like VXX could actually be a viable candidate to hedge or speculate on the way down. Another alternative ETF was TMF, a long Treasuries ETF which banks on the fact that when markets go down, money tends to pack into treasuries viewed as safe instruments. In some cases, TMF even outperformed the usual hedging instruments like leveraged ETFs. There could of course be other factors at play since some of 2014 corrections were related to geopolitical events which are certain...

more from M.T.M.

Pharmboy

2015 - Biotech Fever

Reminder: Pharmboy is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

PSW Members - well, what a year for biotechs!   The Biotech Index (IBB) is up a whopping 40%, beating the S&P hands down!  The healthcare sector has had a number of high flying IPOs, and beat the Tech Sector in total nubmer of IPOs in the past 12 months.  What could go wrong?

Phil has given his Secret Santa Inflation Hedges for 2015, and since I have been trying to keep my head above water between work, PSW, and baseball with my boys...it is time that something is put together for PSW on biotechs in 2015.

Cancer and fibrosis remain two of the hottest areas for VC backed biotechs to invest their monies.  A number of companies have gone IPO which have drugs/technologies that fight cancer, includin...



more from Pharmboy

Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

"Hello PSW Members –

This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743

Thank you for you time!




FeedTheBull - Top Stock market and Finance Sites



About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

Learn more About Phil >>


As Seen On:




About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

Market Shadows >>