Author Archive for Zero Hedge

Greek Banks Considering 30% Haircut On Deposits Over €8,000: FT

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Last week in “For Greeks, The Nightmare Is Just Beginning: Here Come The Depositor Haircuts,” we warned that a Cyrpus-style bail-in of Greek depositors may be imminent given the acute cash crunch that has brought the Greek banking sector to its knees and forced the Greek government to implement capital controls in a futile attempt to stem the flow.

Unfortunately for Greeks, the ECB has frozen the ELA cap, meaning that as of last Sunday, Greek banks were no longer able to meet deposit outflows by tapping emergency liquidity from the Bank of Greece. 

Now, with ATM liquidity expected to run out by Monday and with the country’s future in the eurozone still undecided, it appears as though Alexis Tsipras’ promise that “deposits are safe” may be proven wrong.

According to FTGreek banks are considering a depositor bail-in that could see deposits above €8,000 haircut by “at least” 30%. 

Via FT: 

Greek banks are preparing contingency plans for a possible “bail-in” of depositors amid fears

The plans, which call for a “haircut” of at least 30 per cent on deposits above €8,000, sketch out an increasingly likely scenario for at least one bank, the sources said.

A Greek bail-in could resemble the rescue plan agreed by Cyprus in 2013, when customers’ funds were seized to shore up the banks, with a haircut imposed on uninsured deposits over €100,000.

It would be implemented as part of a recapitalisation of Greek banks that would be agreed with the country’s creditors — the European Commission, International Monetary Fund and European Central Bank.

“It [the haircut] would take place in the context of an overall restructuring of the bank sector once Greece is back in a bailout programme,” said one person following the issue. “This is not something that is going to happen immediately.”

Greek deposits are guaranteed up to €100,000, in line with EU banking directives, but the country’s deposit insurance fund amounts to only €3bn, which would not be enough to cover demand in case of a bank collapse.

With few deposits over €100,000 left in the banks after six months of capital flight, “it makes sense for the banks to consider imposing a haircut on small depositors as part of a recapitalisation. . . It could even be flagged as a one-off tax,” said one


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Barack Obama Tells Another Whopper – He Did Not Create 12.8 Million Jobs

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by David Stockman via Contra Corner blog,

America is better off when President Obama is out on the stump bloviating and boasting rather than in Washington actively doing harm. But the whoppers he just told the students at the University of Wisconsin are beyond the pale. Said our spinmeister-in-chief:

 And the unemployment rate is now down to 5.3 percent. (Applause.) Keep in mind, when I came into office it was hovering around 10 percent. All told, we’ve now seen 64 straight months of private sector job growth, which is a new record — (applause) — new record — 12.8 million new jobs all told.

That’s a pack of context-free factoids. There is still such a thing as the business cycle, and only economically illiterate hacks—-like those who work on the White House speech writing staff—-would measure anything from the deep V-shaped but momentary bottom that happened to occur during Obama’s second year in office. What counts is not that we’ve had a bounce after a terrible bust, but where we are now on a trend basis.

The answer is absolutely nowhere!

We are now 29 quarters from the pre-crisis peak and total non-farm labor hours utilized by the US economy are no higher than they were in Q4 2007. In other words, if you use a common unit of measure—–labor hours rather than job slots which treat coal-miners and part-time pizza delivery boys alike—–there have been no new units of employment at all. Our teleprompter reading President is actually tooting his own horn about recycled hours and “born again”  jobs and doesn’t even know it.

And, no, he can’t take credit for digging us out of the hole created by the Great Recession, either. The long, slow climb back to square one shown in the chart above was due to the natural resilience of our capitalist economy—notwithstanding the tax, regulatory and massive debt hurdles that Washington policies have thrown at it.

The truth of the matter is that America’s employment machine has been failing for this entire century. As shown below, the number of non-farm labor hours utilized during the most recent quarter was only 1% higher than in the spring of 2000—-way back when Bill Clinton still had his hands on things in the Oval Office.

In short, we have gone through two business cycles and have essentially added zero new employment inputs to the US economy.  And that marks a…
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Fearing Spillover, ECB Moves To Shield Neighboring Banks From Greek Meltdown

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

On Monday, in “Beggar Thy Neighbor? Greece’s Battered Banks Beget Balkan Jitters,” we took an in depth look at the potential for the Greek banking crisis to infect Bulgaria, Romania, and Serbia, where Greek banks control a substantial percentage of total banking assets. 

We noted that yields on the country’s bonds had spiked in the wake of capital controls in Greece and the ensuing ATM run, a reflection of souring investor sentiment despite assurances from local banking officials that there was no risk of similar measures being implemented outside of Greece.  

“Any action by the Greek government and the central bank to impose measures in the Greek financial system have no legal force in Bulgaria and can in no way affect the smooth functioning and stability of the Bulgarian banking system,” Bulgaria’s central bank said, in a statement. 

Still, as Morgan Stanley pointed out nearly two months ago, “the risk is that depositors who have their money in Greek subsidiaries in Bulgaria, Romania and Serbia could suffer a confidence crisis and seek to withdraw their deposits. Although well capitalised and liquid, Greek subsidiaries in the SEE region may see difficulties providing enough cash if withdrawals are intense and become problematic. In case of a liquidity shortage, Greek subsidiaries in Bulgaria, Romania and Serbia would probably create the need for local authorities to step in. Local central banks and governments would most probably provide additional liquidity, but if panic behaviour develops it would mean that certain banks would either have to find a buyer or be nationalised. In this case, the national deposit guarantee schemes will have to repay guaranteed deposits and, in case of insufficient funds, the government will have to provide them.”

Now, with Greece’s future in the EMU hanging in the balance, Bloomberg says the ECB has stepped up its efforts to shield Bulgaria from any fallout. Here’s more:

The European Central Bank is set to extend a backstop facility to Bulgaria and is ready to assist other nations in the region to ward off contagion from Greece, according to people familiar with the situation.

The ECB would provide access to its refinancing operations, offering euros to the banking system against eligible collateral, the people said, asking to remain anonymous because the matter is confidential. The ECB and the Bulgarian


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US Pushed For IMF Greek Haircut Study Release After Euro ‘Allies’ Tried To Block

 

US Pushed For IMF Greek Haircut Study Release After Euro 'Allies' Tried To Block

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

The timing of the release of The IMF's 'Greece needs a debt haircut no matter what' report this week was odd to say the least. Being as it confirmed everything the Greek government has been saying and provided the perfect ammunition for Tsipras to spin Sunday's Greferendum as a Yes/No to debt haircuts – something everyone can understand (and get behind). It is understandable then that, as Reuters reports, Greece's eurozone allies tried to block the release of the damning report this week but the Europeans were heavily outnumbered and the United States, the strongest voice in the IMF, was in favor of publication, sources said. While The IMF concluded, "Facts are stubborn. You can't hide the facts because they may be exploited," one wonders if this move merely reinforces Goldman's concpiracy theory.

Euro zone countries tried in vain to stop the IMF publishing a gloomy analysis of Greece's debt burden which the leftist government says vindicates its call to voters to reject bailout terms, sources familiar with the situation said on Friday. As Reuters reports, publication of the draft Debt Sustainability Analysis laid bare a dispute between Brussels and the Washington-based global lender that has been simmering behind closed doors for months.

At a meeting on the International Monetary Fund's board on Wednesday, European members questioned the timing of the report which IMF management proposed at short notice releasing three days before Sunday's crucial referendum that may determine the country's future in the euro zone, the sources said.

There was no vote but the Europeans were heavily outnumbered and the United States, the strongest voice in the IMF, was in favor of publication, the sources said.

The Europeans were also concerned that the report could distract attention from a view they share with the IMF that the Tsipras government, in the five months since it was elected, has wrecked a fragile economy that was just starting to recover.

"It wasn't an easy decision," an IMF source involved in the debate over publication said. "We are not living in an ivory tower here. But the EU


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Massive “No” Demonstration Floods Athens’ Syntagma Square As Tsipras Speaks – Live Webcast

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Shortly before Greek PM Tsipras spoke at today’s huge “No” rally on Syntagma square, scuffles in the crowds of protesters broke out and police have resorted to stun grenades and tear gas.

As Reuters reported,Greek police threw stun grenades and scuffled with protesters in central Athens on Friday, as a rally got under way in support of a ‘No’ vote in a Sunday referendum on whether to endorse an aid deal with creditors. The scuffles involved a few dozen people, many dressed in black and wearing helmets but quickly appeared to calm.”

Luckily, the violence was scattered and promptly dissipated.

Instead it has been replaced with one of the biggest people gatherings on Syntagma square in history:

Live Feed:





Do Share Buybacks Create Value? (Spoiler Alert: No)

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by Omid Malekan via OmidMalekan.com,

Stock buybacks have been in the news lately, as their growing size has lead to criticism, especially from politicians who believe they contribute to economic inequality. But the simplest critique of the practice of buybacks can be made on economic grounds, in terms of value created or destroyed.

If you ask a seasoned investor to boil success down to one sentence, they’ll probably say “buy low and sell high.” Ask them to simplify even more, and they’ll say “buy value” – which usually correlates with buying something when its cheap. If we flip these maxims around then the worst kind of investing is to buy high. Expensive things do occasionally become more expensive –  but with greater risk.

I have always been weary of buybacks, going all the way back to the last buyback boom before the financial crisis. My concern then was that by purchasing shares management was making a declaration, that this is a good time to buy our stock, as opposed to the past or the future. But if management knows that then it knows how to time the market, and if management knows how to time the market, then it’s better off running a hedge fund. Since management is instead running a company, it should focus on what it was hired to do and leave the stock market alone.

Taking the practice to a more extreme measure, many large companies today are tapping the debt markets, borrowing money at record low rates and using the proceeds for buybacks. The practice is popular among blue chip companies like Apple and Microsoft, who despite their cash heavy balance sheets prefer the tax efficiency of financing buybacks with debt. The old me would find such a practice even more unwise, as it entails timing two markets at once, a feat even a seasoned hedge fund manager would have trouble pulling off. But the old me didn’t understand how buybacks really work.

To call an action market timing is to imply participants care about price. They are buying today because today offers a good price whereas tomorrow might not. But executives doing buybacks don’t care about price. We know this because new buybacks are not announced with any limitations on share price. We are going to buy back $2
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Greeks Split On Greferendum As Credit Suisse Says “No” Vote Defies “Rationality”

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

With just two days to go until Greeks decide their fate in the eurozone, the country is split down the middle, a new poll shows. The survey, commissioned by Bloomberg and conducted by the University of Macedonia Research Institute of Applied Social and Economic Studies, shows that “43 percent intend to vote ‘no’ to reject the austerity demanded by creditors in exchange for financial aid, while 42.5 percent back a ‘yes’ to accept the conditions.” 

Bloomberg goes on to say that support for a ‘no’ vote has dwindled since Tsipras first announced the plebiscite last week, which seems to suggest that the bite of capital controls has quickly forced many Greeks to reconsider whether the benefits of standing firm in the face of overbearing creditors truly outweigh the economic costs of an EMU exit. 

The narrowing lead for the “no” side comes as IMF research appears to support Tsipras and Varoufakis’ contention that any feasible Greek deal should include debt relief.

As we said on Thursday, the report (which was prepared prior to capital controls and the banking sector meltdown) shows that any deal which includes creditor concessions on fiscal reforms would mean Greece’s debt load would have to be written down, as the country would need at least €60 billion in new financing. Subsequently, the media and sell side chimed in. Here’s Barclays for instance: 

The IMF released yesterday a document with a revised debt sustainability analysis for Greece. The document basically argues that OSI is a necessary condition in order to secure sovereign solvency with a high probability. This means that before the IMF re-engages in any lending activities with Greece, OSI will be required in the form of NPV debt relief.

The timing of the publication of this report it is very important. Debt relief is something that the Greek authorities have repeatedly demanded; therefore, in a way this report can be interpreted as the IMF backing the Greek government’s demands. By extension, it could also be interpreted as supportive of a ‘No’ vote, which is what the Greek government is campaigning for.

We’ll see over the weekend, if the “no” vote is bolstered by the IMF’s findings. 

Meanwhile, Wall Street continues to speculate on what happens in the event of a “no” or worse, a…
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What Choice Do We Have?

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submittted by Charles Hugh-Smith of OfTwoMinds blog,

As systemic solutions fall short, we must grasp the nettle of making our own arrangements in a time characterized by burgeoning demands and diminishing resources, capital and security.

The idea that our large-scale problems could be fixed with systemic reforms is enticing: replace the thousands of pages of tax code with a simple flat tax without deductions, for example, or the replacement of too big to jail/fail banks with community-owned banks that served the public, not shareholders.

But the attraction of reforms is a siren song, because our system is run by vested interests for vested interests, period. Any real reform is Dead On Arrival (DOA) because any real reform threatens the swag and security of vested interests.

One person's livelihood is another person's vested interest.

Toss in The Enchanting Charms of Cheap, Easy Credit and Our Spoiled-Brat Economy and we have a toxic resistance to systemic reforms that require any degrowth, direct democracy, writedowns of debt, devolution of centalized power, i.e. any real reforms of the unsustainable status quo.

So where does that leave us? With no choice but to submit? No, it leaves us with private solutions, by which I mean arrangements made on the individual and household level that do not assume the unsustainable status quo will magically continue to issue us our "we wuz promised" share of the swag.

Private solutions subdivide into practicalities (securing multiple income streams, choosing where to live, arranging access to healthcare, food and energy, proximity to friends and family, like-minded colleagues, etc.) and what we might term self-fulfillment: aligning our internal goals, priorities, personality traits, values and skills with the practical externalities of daily life.

Longtime correspondent Bart D. recently responded to an email in which I expressed the all-too common sense of being overwhelmed--by work, duties, responsibilities. His response gives us a starting place for choosing our priorities and goals:

"At the suggestion of a 93-year old relative, I spent a bit of time thinking of myself as being on my death-bed and considering what I’d wished I’d spent more time doing in my life. Then I went out and did it (and still am). That way, hopefully, when I eventually get there, I won’t have any need to ask myself that
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US Equity Futures Give Up Early Gains, Nasdaq Biggest Loser

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

On what is obviously a quiet day, with US cash markets closed, US equity futures drifted quite notably weaker from overnight highs. Aside from total chaos in the last second of trading today, Nasdaq futures were down 0.3% (having been up over 0.2% at Europe opened) and The Dow dropped 80 from the highs. It appears the machines forgot it was a holiday as the standard US open to EU close trend reversal occuurred before dropping after Europe closed.

Notice the chaotic meltup into the close…

It all went a bit “Simple Jack” in the last few seconds…

Charts: Bloomberg





FDIC Sounds Alarm On Insolvent, “Zero Hedged” Oil & Gas Producers

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

On Thursday, we outlined how America’s heavily indebted E&P companies are about to be “zero hedged” when the downside protection that accounted for some 15% of Q1 revenue for nearly half of North American O&G operations rolls off. 

In short, the hedges that had, until now anyway, helped to forestall a terminal cash crunch are set to expire, which will have the knock-on effect of making it more difficult for the companies to maintain crucial credit lines with banks.

As discussed yesterday, the payments from the hedges were the last line of defense for a sector that has been kept afloat in part by artificially suppressed borrowing costs and investors’ hunt for yield. These otherwise insolvent companies have tapped wide open equity and credit markets allowing them to keep producing, which in turn has contributed to the very same depressed prices and global deflationary supply glut that bankrupted the sector in the first place. 

Now, even the regulators (who are, as a rule, always behind the curve when it comes to assessing risk) are “sounding the alarm bells”. WSJ has the story:

U.S. regulators are sounding the alarm about banks’ exposure to oil-and-gas producers, a move that could limit their ability to lend to companies battered by a yearlong slump in prices.

The Federal Reserve, Office of the Comptroller of the Currency and Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. are telling banks that a large number of loans they have issued to these companies are substandard, said people familiar with the matter, as they issue preliminary results of a joint national examination of major loan portfolios.

The substandard designation indicates regulators doubt a borrower’s ability to repay or question the value of the assets that back a loan. The designation typically limits banks’ ability to extend additional credit to the borrowers.

The move could add an extra obstacle to companies struggling with high debt loads amid lower prices for the oil and natural gas they produce. Banks have been flexible with troubled energy companies to avoid triggering a flood of defaults and bankruptcy filings, but regulatory pressure could force them to tighten the purse strings.

This year’s Shared National Credit review process contrasts with those in prior years, when regulators didn’t broadly disagree with the banks’ own ratings of credit facilities


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Zero Hedge

Greek Banks Considering 30% Haircut On Deposits Over €8,000: FT

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Last week in "For Greeks, The Nightmare Is Just Beginning: Here Come The Depositor Haircuts," we warned that a Cyrpus-style bail-in of Greek depositors may be imminent given the acute cash crunch that has brought the Greek banking sector to its knees and forced the Greek government to implement capital controls in a futile attempt to stem the flow.

Unfortunately for Greeks, the ECB has frozen the ELA cap, meaning that as of last Sunday, Greek banks were no longer able to meet deposit outflows by tapping emergency liquidity from the Bank of Greece. 

No...



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Phil's Favorites

June Mehployment Report

Courtesy of Joshua Brown, The Reformed Broker

Much ado about not much. Labor Force Participation Rate falls again, 400,000 people basically dropped out, maybe forever, but the unemployment rate hits a low not seen since the spring of 2008.

Average hourly earnings were subdued, possibly putting the FOMC on pause. Or not. I’m increasingly convinced they plan to flip a coin in September. The new FOMC dot plot below:

Labor force participation is now at its lowest level since I was born in 1977. This is because – I don’t know if you know this – there are a lot of boomers in America that have been...



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Market News

News You Can Use From Phil's Stock World

 

Financial Markets and Economy

Did the IMF Just Open Pandora's Box? (Zero Hedge)

By now it should be clear to all that the only reason why Germany has been so steadfast in its negotiating stance with Greece is because it knows very well that if it concedes to a public debt reduction (as opposed to haircut on debt held mostly by private entities such as hedge funds which already happened in 2012), then the rest of the PIIGS will come pouring in: first Italy, then Spain, then Portugal, then Ireland.

Baker Hughes rig count rises for the first time in 29 weeks (Business Insider)

The number of US oil rigs in use just rose for the first...



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Chart School

Neutral Day

Courtesy of Declan.

After yesterday's gains there was no more gas in the tank to squeeze any more out of the market. Worryingly, the Russell 2000 finished near Monday's lows in a relative loss to S&P and Nasdaq, suggesting bearish leadership will come from speculative Small Caps, and that further losses are likely. The S&P recovered afternoon losses, but the Spinning Top candlestick of today suggests the advance is slowing, and what may be emerging is a 'bear flag'. In the meantime, the index is caught in a no-mans land between resistance and support. ...

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All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: David is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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Kimble Charting Solutions

Shanghai index creates historic reversal pattern like 2007

Courtesy of Chris Kimble.

CLICK ON CHART TO ENLARGE

Much of the attention around the world seems to be revolving around a small country called Greece. What about the most populated country in the world (China), any key messages coming from there of late?

Well another Month, Quarter and Half a year are in the books. With this in mind I wanted to look at Monthly action of the hottest stock market in the world, the Shanghai Index. Above looks at the Shanghai index over the past 25-years. The 100%+ rally over the past year has pushed the Shanghai index up to its 23% Fibonacci ratio and a long-term resistance line, that has been in play for 25-years at (1) above.

As the Shanghai index was hitting this...



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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of June 29th., 2015

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Digital Currencies

BitGold Now Available in US! Why BitGold?

Courtesy of Mish.

BitGold USA

Effective today, BitGold Announces Platform Launch in the United States.

BitGold, a platform for savings and payments in gold, is pleased to announce the launch of the BitGold platform for residents of the US and US territories. As of today, US residents can sign up on the BitGold platform and buy, sell, or redeem gold using BitGold’s Aurum payment and settlement technology. US residents will also have access to the BitGold mobile app and a prepaid card when these features launch over the coming weeks. Send and receive gold payment features are not initially available in the US.

About BitGold

...



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Sabrient

Sector Detector: Bulls under the gun to muster troops, while bears lie in wait

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Two weeks ago, bulls seemed ready to push stocks higher as long-standing support reliably kicked in. But with just one full week to go before the Independence Day holiday week arrives, we will see if bulls can muster some reinforcements and make another run at the May highs. Small caps and NASDAQ are already there, but it is questionable whether those segments can drag along the broader market. To be sure, there is plenty of potential fuel floating around in the form of a friendly Fed and abundant global liquidity seeking the safety and strength of US stocks and bonds. While the technical picture has glimmers of strength, summer bears lie in wait.

In this weekly ...



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Pharmboy

Baxter's Spinoff

Reminder: Pharmboy and Ilene are available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Baxter Int. (BAX) is splitting off its BioSciences division into a new company called Baxalta. Shares of Baxalta will be given as a tax-free dividend, in the ratio of one to one, to BAX holders on record on June 17, 2015. That means, if you want to receive the Baxalta dividend, you need to buy the stock this week (on or before June 12).

The Baxalta Spinoff

By Ilene with Trevor of Lowenthal Capital Partners and Paul Price

In its recent filing with the SEC, Baxter provides:

“This information statement is being ...



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Mapping The Market

An update on oil proxies

Courtesy of Jean-Luc Saillard

Back in December, I wrote a post on my blog where I compared the performances of various ETFs related to the oil industry. I was looking for the best possible proxy to match the moves of oil prices if you didn't want to play with futures. At the time, I concluded that for medium term trades, USO and the leveraged ETFs UCO and SCO were the most promising. Longer term, broader ETFs like OIH and XLE might make better investment if oil prices do recover to more profitable prices since ETF linked to futures like USO, UCO and SCO do suffer from decay. It also seemed that DIG and DUG could be promising if OIH could recover as it should with the price of oil, but that they don't make a good proxy for the price of oil itself. 

Since...



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Promotions

Watch the Phil Davis Special on Money Talk on BNN TV!

Kim Parlee interviews Phil on Money Talk. Be sure to watch the replays if you missed the show live on Wednesday night (it was recorded on Monday). As usual, Phil provides an excellent program packed with macro analysis, important lessons and trading ideas. ~ Ilene

 

The replay is now available on BNN's website. For the three part series, click on the links below. 

Part 1 is here (discussing the macro outlook for the markets) Part 2 is here. (discussing our main trading strategies) Part 3 is here. (reviewing our pick of th...

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Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

"Hello PSW Members –

This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743

Thank you for you time!




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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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