Archive for 2015

China Floats QE Trial Balloon, PBoC May Launch LTROs

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

A little over a month ago we suggested that QE in China may take the form of local government debt purchases by the PBoC. As a reminder, China is allowing local governments to refinance a portion of their ~17 trillion yuan debt pile by swapping it for lower yielding bonds. As a percentage of GDP, local government debt has grown to 35% and because a sizeable amount was accumulated off balance sheet via shadow banking channels, it carries relatively high interest rates.

The pilot program will allow for the refinancing of around 1 trillion of that debt, a move which could save local governments some 50 billion yuan in interest payments. As a reminder, here’s what the local government debt picture looks like in China:

The problem with the scheme however, is that the banks who purchase the newly issued local government bonds will have that much less cash to lend at a time when the central bank is keen to keep liquidity flowing and as we’ve seen over the past several months, several factors are conspiring to undercut or otherwise limit the effectiveness of interest rate and RRR cuts. Essentially, China is caught between a peg to the strong dollar, decelerating economic growth, and capital outflows, meaning that devaluation to bolster flagging exports risks aggravating capital flight while not devaluing gets more costly by the quarter. It’s this currency conundrum that has led us to predict that in the end, China will resort to QE. 

Given the new refinancing progam, it seemed logical to suggest that if China wanted to integrate QE into its current efforts to assist local governments with their debt load, the central bank could simply buy the local government debt. Here’s what we said last month: “It seems as though one way to address the issue would be for the PBoC to simply purchase a portion of the local debt pile and we wonder if indeed this will ultimately be the form that QE will take in China.” As the WSJ reports, China may do just that, although the program, should it become a reality, will still be one step away from outright QE:

China’s central bank is considering taking a page from Europe’s financial-crisis handbook to free up more credit as growth in the world’s second-largest


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Swing trading portfolio – week of April 20th, 2015

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This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

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America’s Pension Problem

Mish special guested on Gordon T. Long's Market Research and Analytics in a recording called "Mish Shedock Talks: America's Pension Problems," presented below, courtesy of Gordon T. Long. 

Mike Shedlock / Mish is a registered investment advisor representative for SitkaPacific Capital Management. Sitka Pacific is an asset management firm whose goal is strong performance and low volatility, regardless of market direction. Read more at http://globaleconomicanalysis.blogspot.com

 

MISH SHEDLOCK TALKS

AMERICA'S PENSION PROBLEM

Published 04-18-15

Mish Shedlock talks about the magnitude of the mounting Pension Problem in America and uses his home state of Illinois as a prime example. According to a State Budget Solutions, last year’s state unfunded pensions reached an all-time high of $4.7 trillion. This funding gap state public pension plans are underfunded by $4.7 trillion, up from $4.1 trillion in 2013. Overall, the combined plans' funded status has dipped three percentage points to 36%. Split among all Americans, the unfunded liability is over $15,000 per person.

ILLINOIS' PENDING PENSION CRISIS

"Illinois Pension's in general are 39% funded! This is after this massive rally we have had since 2009 in financial assets. Some of the worst ones are only about 20% funded. I think the Teacher's Pension Plan is about that and the General Assembly and Judicial Pension Plan are also on the bottom."

"Various cities in Illinois have problems, Chicago being one of them. The City of Chicago has a huge pension crisis right now. We have things in Illinois like "Home Rule Taxes" where cities can levy their own taxes in addition to the state. That is why we have varying sales tax that range anywhere from 6% to 10%, depending on locality."

"I believe Chicago is Bankrupt!"

"I have been working with the Illinois Policy Institute. There are a number of cities in Illinois (I am not going to name them), but…
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This is NOT Fair!

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Capitalist Exploits.

By Chris at www.CapitalistExploits.at

Looking back on my own childhood I reckon raising kids must have been a piece of cake. Parents let their kids wander off to the nearest state school where justice was swift and harsh. Caning was all the rage and I certainly got my fair share. It was all pretty fair. You screw up, you get caned. Easy enough to understand.

Parents seeking a “better education” for their spawn looked outside of state schools. In private schools they found this wonderful thing called boarding schools where you don’t even have to raise your own kids. The process was simple. Look around for the boarding school furthest from home, ship Johnny off with some simple advice, “try not to get sodomized too much and see you in the holidays.”

School was for the most part pretty fair, unless you were being sodomized.

The concept of fairness is ingrained in human nature. I still recall my sister lining up glasses on the table with juice in them. Fizzy juice was a luxury in our house growing up, used only on special occasions and meted out with military precision. No way were you going to get less than your sibling. The juice in each cup had to be EXACT!

Juice

One slight inch higher on one cup meant a re-balancing and re-pouring was required. This could easily take 20 minutes! I remember measuring with a ruler.

Ah, fairness…

This doesn’t go away as an adult. In fact, it gets stronger. Now I get mad when I see unfair situations and one example can be found in financing start-ups.

Stacking notes

A purely hypothetical entrepreneur comes to you with a deal. It is a standard convertible note which, for the purposes of this example, is a $500,000 convertible note with a 20% discount and a $5M cap. You sign up for the deal but then the company realises that they have way more interest from investors than they had thought and they further realise that they need more money than originally thought. “No problem,” they say, “we’ll just put more money on this cap and raise it to a $8M cap”. Six months later they raise another tranche of capital on the same note but now at a $10M…
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The Chilling Thing Blackstone Said about the Oil Bust

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by testosteronepit.

Wolf Richter   www.wolfstreet.com   www.amazon.com/author/wolfrichter

Regardless of how troubled oil and gas companies are, “if the assets are good, someone will own them,” explained David Foley, senior managing director of Blackstone Energy Partners.

He expected companies to buckle under the load of junk debt and kick off a long series of bankruptcies and assets sales at rock-bottom prices. The question was when.

That was in February. Private equity firms – the “smart money” – have been out in force for months, raising tens of billions of dollars, with the promise to their investors that they would pick up assets of all kinds on the cheap. They’ve been circling like vultures, waiting to swoop down and pick the best morsels off the carcasses soon to be strewn about the oil patch.

“The timing of having that capital available now really couldn’t be better,” Blackstone CEO Steve Schwarzman said at the time. He expected that it would take one-and-a-half years before oil and gas companies would be completely drained of cash and would get into serious trouble. But some of the service companies could run out of money and topple “very, very quickly,” he said. Over the next couple of years, there would be “all kinds of shakeouts.”

PE firms expected valuations to plunge much further as assets would hit the auction block. And so Blackstone president Tony James said that his people were “scrambling” to invest over $10 billion. They were all singing from the same page.

And PE firms continued raising money for their energy funds. A week ago, EnCap Investments in Houston closed its Energy Capital Fund X after having raised $6.5 billion. It had been “significantly oversubscribed,” the firm said; investors are clamoring for this sort of bottom-picking action by the smart money.

Blackstone, Carlyle Group, Apollo, and KKR together have raised about $30 billion for energy investments, according to Bloomberg. Walburg Pincus, Riverstone, and many others – they all have been raising billions of dollars each. The piles in dry powder grow by the day.

This is the “smart money.” The oil bust had wiped tens of billions of dollars from their energy portfolios, including KKR’s disastrous investment in Samson Resources. Someday, they’re going to get this right. That’s the idea.

Then something unexpected happened. Other investors were despairing with negative…
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American Justice? FBI Lab Overstated 95% Of Forensic Hair Matches (Including 32 Death Sentences)

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by Mike Krieger via Liberty Blitzkrieg blog,

The Justice Department and FBI have formally acknowledged that nearly every examiner in an elite FBI forensic unit gave flawed testimony in almost all trials in which they offered evidence against criminal defendants over more than a two-decade period before 2000.

Of 28 examiners with the FBI Laboratory’s microscopic hair comparison unit, 26 overstated forensic matches in ways that favored prosecutors in more than 95 percent of the 268 trials reviewed so far, according to the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers (NACDL) and the Innocence Project, which are assisting the government with the country’s largest post-conviction review of questioned forensic evidence.

The cases include those of 32 defendants sentenced to death. Of those, 14 have been executed or died in prison.

“These findings are appalling and chilling in their indictment of our criminal justice system, not only for potentially innocent defendants who have been wrongly imprisoned and even executed, but for prosecutors who have relied on fabricated and false evidence despite their intentions to faithfully enforce the law,” Blumenthal said.

– From the Washington Post article: FBI Overstated Forensic Hair Matches in Nearly All Trials efore 2000

The American justice system is broken. Completely and totally broken. This has been one of the key themes here at Liberty Blitzkrieg since inception, and I’ve come to realize that the death of the rule of law is the single most important issue facing our society at this time.

This site has focused on the increased use of selective prosecution in these United States. If you are poor, disenfranchised, or a dissident, the full force of the law will rain down on your skull like a thousand tons of bricks. We have seen this repeatedly in cases such as the South Carolina man who was fined $525 and fired from his job when he failed to pay for a $0.89 soda refill. We saw it in the case of Aaron Swartz, the child prodigy was driven to suicide by overly aggressive and ambitious feds. Finally, we saw it in the case of Barrett Brown, who was threatened with over a century in jail for essentially exposing the criminality of certain very rich and/or powerful individuals.

On the other side of the fence, we see that anyone associated with the power structure can do whatever they…
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Chinese Stocks Pump’n'Dump After RRR Cut, Retrace Friday’s Crash

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

After crashing 6-7% on Friday (depending on which Chinese stock index you prefer) – all after the cash markets closed in China – thanks to today’s major RRR cut, China stock futures are up 7% from Friday’s US session close. However, while futures have recovered all those losses, the Shanghai Composite cash index is trading modestly lower from its Friday cash close levels (we suspect a little disappointingly to some) after recovering the entire loss from post-China-close Friday.

Futures ripped back…

Just looking at the cash Shanghai Composite index – you’d never know it crashed… but it’s fading back lower again now…

We suspect this is not the exuberance many had expected…

Charts: Bloomberg





Vapor Capital Asset Mismanagement LP: Jon Corzine Planning Hedge Fund Launch

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Shortly after Jon Corzine not only destroyed MF Global but “vaporized” $1.6 billion in supposedly segregated client funds which were illegally commingled with operating cash, Jon Corzine had a brief encounter with the legal system including several kangaroo court sessions in Congress, which ultimately led to absolutely nothing for two simple reasons.

Reason #1:

And Reason #2:

In fact, Jon Corzine’s quiet disappearance into the shadows was apparently only punctuated by one new notable entry in the Urban Dictionary for the term “Corzined

… but not before rumors emerged that Corzine, whose dream has always been to run his own capital, would start a hedge fund. In August 2012 we wrote that “after 10 months of stitching together evidence on the firm’s demise, criminal investigators are concluding that chaos and porous risk controls at the firm, rather than fraud, allowed the money to disappear, according to people involved in the case.” And algos… And glitches… And faulty software installs… And some junior person who has long since left the company…  and, and, and, lots and lots of passive voice… Because in the Banana republic of the crave, no bundles can ever go to jail, no matter how heinous the crime, which is not to say other places are better: in Thailand you shoot your secretary in the stomach during dinner with an Uzi and you don’t even pay a $600 fine. But at least it puts things in perspective. So what is next in store for this former man of power? “Mr. Corzine, in a bid to rebuild his image and engage his passion for trading, is weighing whether to start a hedge fund, according to people with knowledge of his plans. He is currently trading with his family’s wealth. If he is successful as a hedge fund manager, it would be the latest career comeback for a man who was ousted from both the top seat at Goldman Sachs and the New Jersey governor’s mansion.” So will Jon will be buying Italian bonds? We don’t know. Ask him yourself.”

However, this led absolutely nowhere, leading many to speculate that Corzine was just waiting for a correction before reentering the asset mismanagement business.

Well, nearly three years later of manipulated, artificially propped up markets floating on $22…
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Bond/Utility Divergence Flashes Warning Sign For S&P 500

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by Dana Lyons,

Given their relatively high yields, utility stocks have long been thought of as proxies, or at least competition, for bonds. And while that relationship is often overplayed (utility stocks are first and foremost, stocks), there is some credence to the notion. Since 1970, there is a 26% positive correlation in 2-month returns between 10-Year Treasuries and the Dow Jones Utility Average (DJUA). Although that’s not a hugely positive correlation, contrasted against the 10-Year vs. S&P 500 correlation which is slightly negative over that time, you can see there appears to be some influence from bonds on the behavior of utilities.

For that reason, while the two markets can go in opposite directions at times, it is fairly rare to see them diverge to the extent that they have recently. While bonds are at 2-month highs, utility stocks have actually lost ground over the past 2 months. As of a few days ago, the DJUA was actually down more than 5% over the previous 2 months. That wide of a divergence has only been triggered on roughly 5% of all rolling 2-month periods since 1970. Adding the qualifier that the S&P 500 is also trading within 5% of its 52-week high, the scenario is even more rare, having occurred on just 87 days (or 0.7% of the time) since 1970. (More on the S&P 500 below.)

image

What hath this divergence wrought in the past. Well, as far as the forward returns in both the 10-Year Treasuries and utilities are concerned…not much. Consider the change in 10-Year Yields following such divergences (i.e., Treasuries up over past 2 months, utilities down over 5% and the S&P 500 within 5% of its 52-week high).

image

It was common to see some reversion over the subsequent months as bonds gave up some of their gains and yields crept a bit higher. However, after 3 months, the performance of bonds was not too different than normal. And with utilities, we see the same thing.

image

Utility stocks did not persist in their negative divergence, instead scoring slightly above-average gains across all time frames. However, again the returns were not too different than normal.

Now for the S&P 500. We introduced the…
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Rise In Traveling Hookers, Depressed Gambling, Booze Sales Bode Poorly For US Economy

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Retail sales rounded out their worst 3-month run since Lehman last month and even as April’s print showed the biggest sequential rise in nearly a year, sales still missed expectations affording us the opportunity to point out yet another “since Lehman” moment as retail sales haven’t missed for four consecutive months since the end of 2008. This really shouldn’t come as a surprise to those who are paying attention because as we’re fond of pointing out, America’s “non-supervisory” employees (who make up more than three quarters of the workforce) are suffering from declining wage growth and with wage growth now an almost perfect predictor of consumer spending, one would expect retail sales to take a hit. 

Of course this trend doesn’t just affect the Best Buys and Gaps of the world, it also takes its toll on hookers, liquor stores, drug dealers, and casinos and when sex, drugs, and gambling aren’t selling you can go ahead and kiss your “recovery” hopes goodbye. 

With that in mind we present the following chart which shows that Andrew Zatlin’s Vice Index nearly printed in contraction territory in March and at 100, the index is dangerously close to indicating that America’s spending on “the fun stuff” (to quote Zatlin) looks set to fall. 

Here’s some color from Zatlin:

Vice spending leads the way, both in terms of inclination and ability to spend. If luxury good spending is sensitive to shifts in the economic winds, vice is even more so. One thing that sets it apart from other types of consumer spending (besides being frequently illegal) is that it’s typically a cash-based transaction. You can’t buy pot with a credit card (not yet anyhow). Another distinguishing factor is that vices are not cheap. A prostitute costs almost two days of after-tax wages. Gambling in Vegas is potentially more. The consumer’s stack of money has to be a certain height before they can get on that ride. The vice economy lives and dies according to cash flow; by how much money is burning a hole in the consumer’s pocket…

The Moneyball Economics Vice Index is the first index that quantifies these forms of spending. It has been shown to accurately lead consumer spending by at least two months. Right now, it is showing evidence of


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Phil's Favorites

What kind of Brexit will Britain now 'get done' after Boris Johnson's thumping election win?

 

What kind of Brexit will Britain now ‘get done’ after Boris Johnson’s thumping election win?

Courtesy of Tom Quinn, University of Essex

The Conservatives’ victory in the UK general election is at once a decisive moment of clarity and a harbinger of uncertainty. Prime Minister Boris Johnson called the election with a pledge to “get Brexit done”, and with his newly-won parliamentary majority, he is now in a position to do just that.

The shape of Brexit has already been defined by the withdrawal agreement Johnson negotiated with the EU in October. It en...



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Chart School

Funds are getting ready to move out of USA

Courtesy of Read the Ticker

Just before the hang over in the US equity markets, money will move and take their well earned gains else where. Here is why.

More from RTT Tv







Charts in video.

US is in the late cycle boom.

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US stock market with the US dollar, they have risen together from 2012. A change of this will force money to move.


Cli...



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Zero Hedge

Bianco: Mom-And-Pop Aren't The Ones Getting Suckered By FOMO

Courtesy of ZeroHedge View original post here.

Authored by Jim Bianco via Bloomberg.com,

The current bull market is historic. According to Goldman Sachs Group Inc., it’s been 10.7 years since the last 20% correction, the longest such run in more than 120 years. In 2019 alone, the S&P 500 Index has surged more than 25%, with recent gains being attributed in part to investors chasin...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

Euro Breakout In Play? Gold Bulls Sure Hope So!

Courtesy of Chris Kimble

The Euro has spent much of the past 2 years trading in a down-trend.

Though precious metals like Gold have fared well, this has been a bit of a headwind because it means that the US Dollar has remained firm.

Big Test In Play for the Euro

The Euro is testing a confluence of important support just as the downtrend is narrowing and ready for a “break”. That support includes lower falling wedge support and the Euro’s long term up-trend support line (see points 1 and 2).

If the Euro can succeed in breaking out at (3), it would be bullis...



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Insider Scoop

8 Healthcare Stocks Moving In Friday's Pre-Market Session

Courtesy of Benzinga

Gainers
  • Sarepta Therapeutics, Inc. (NASDAQ: SRPT) stock surged 36.4% to $137.00 during Friday's pre-market session. The market value of their outstanding shares is at $6.1 billion. The most recent rating by Janney Capital, on December 13, is at Buy, with a price target of $175.00.
  • GlaxoSmithKline, Inc. (NYSE: GSK) shares surged 1.1% to $46.44. The market value of their outstanding shares is at $112.9 billion. According to the most recent rating by UBS, on November 21, the current rating is at Buy.
  • AstraZeneca, Inc. (NYSE: ...


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Digital Currencies

Three Men Arrested In NJ For Running Alleged $722 Million Crypto Ponzi Scheme

Courtesy of ZeroHedge View original post here.

Authored by Kollen Post via CoinTelegraph.com,

United States authorities in New Jersey have announced the arrest of three men who are accused of defrauding investors of over $722 million as part of alleged crypto ponzie scheme BitClub Network, per a Dec. 10 announcement from the Dep...



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Lee's Free Thinking

Chart Shows the Fed Ramping Up Not QE - Funding Almost All Treasury Issuance

 

Chart Shows the Fed Ramping Up Not QE – Funding Almost All Treasury Issuance

Courtesy of Lee Adler, Wall Street Examiner 

The Fed is ramping up “Not QE” .

The Fed bought $2.2 billion in notes today in its POMO, “not QE,” operations. Actually $2.15 billion because they sold back a whole $50 million. Must have been a little glitch in the force.

This brings the Fed’s total outright purchases of Treasuries to $170 billion since it started Not QE, on September 17.

It also did $107 billion in gross new repo loans to Primary Dealers to buy Tre...



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Members' Corner

Sacha Baron Cohen Uses ADL Speech to Tear Apart Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook

 

Sacha Baron Cohen Uses ADL Speech to Tear Apart Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook

By Matt Wilstein

Excerpt:

Sacha Baron Cohen accepted the International Leadership Award at the Anti-Defamation League’s Never is Now summit on anti-Semitism and hate Thursday. And the comedian and actor used his keynote speech to single out the one Jewish-American who he believes is doing the most to facilitate “hate and violence” in America: Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg.

He began with a joke at the Trump administration’s expense. “Thank you, ADL, for this recognition and your work in fighting racism, hate and bigotry,” Baron Cohen said, according to his prepared...



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The Technical Traders

VIX Warns Of Imminent Market Correction

Courtesy of Technical Traders

The VIX is warning that a market peak may be setting up in the global markets and that investors should be cautious of the extremely low price in the VIX. These extremely low prices in the VIX are typically followed by some type of increased volatility in the markets.

The US Federal Reserve continues to push an easy money policy and has recently begun acquiring more dept allowing a deeper move towards a Quantitative Easing stance. This move, along with investor confidence in the US markets, has prompted early warning signs that the market has reached near extreme levels/peaks. 

Vix Value Drops Before Monthly Expiration

When the VIX falls to levels below 12~13, this typically v...



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Biotech

Why telling people with diabetes to use Walmart insulin can be dangerous advice

Reminder: We are available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

Why telling people with diabetes to use Walmart insulin can be dangerous advice

A vial of insulin. Prices for the drug, crucial for those with diabetes, have soared in recent years. Oleksandr Nagaiets/Shutterstock.com

Courtesy of Jeffrey Bennett, Vanderbilt University

About 7.4 million people ...



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Mapping The Market

How IPOs Are Priced

Via Jean Luc 

Funny but probably true:

...

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Free eBook - "My Top Strategies for 2017"

 

 

Here's a free ebook for you to check out! 

Phil has a chapter in a newly-released eBook that we think you’ll enjoy.

In My Top Strategies for 2017, Phil's chapter is Secret Santa’s Inflation Hedges for 2017.

This chapter isn’t about risk or leverage. Phil present a few smart, practical ideas you can use as a hedge against inflation as well as hedging strategies designed to assist you in staying ahead of the markets.

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