Archive for 2016

What If Nobody Showed Up To Vote?

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by Dan Sanchez via AntiWar.com,

What if a presidential candidate threw a political rally, and nobody came? What if a government held an election, and nobody voted? What if that same government started a war, and nobody participated, whether in body or in spirit?

These questions are related.

Election season is trudging on, as are the wars. Many fans of peace hold out hope that if the former turns out a certain way, the latter may at last be mitigated.

Some are terrified of Hillary Clinton. And who can blame them? As Secretary of State, “Dick Cheney in a pantsuit” was midwife to so many of the disasters that wrack the world with bloodshed and chaos to this day. Many anti-war folk of a left-leaning persuasion are flocking to Bernie Sanders.

Others are more concerned with finally toppling the neocons from their perches of power. And who can blame them? The roots of our geopolitical plight reach back to before Clinton’s executive tenure, when the Bush administration neocons were launching their plans to remake the Greater Middle East. Many anti-war folk of the right-leaning persuasion are looking to Donald Trump to be their neocon-slayer.

But is this really the best we can do?

At the end of the day, Sanders is a moderate foreign interventionist who isn’t all too interested in foreign policy in the first place. Must anti-interventionists really settle for that in order to oppose hyper-interventionist Clinton?

And Trump actually out-hawks many Republicans when it comes to torture, the security state, civilian casualties, and blood-for-oil. Is such a man really to be the anti-war movement’s appointed champion against the neocons?

Thankfully, there is no need to support lesser warmongers in order to oppose greater ones.

Imagine if all the anti-war progressives now supporting Sanders, plus all the America-firsters now supporting Trump, were to stop flooding the internet and social media with electoral polemics. What if all that passion and digital ink was redirected to the message of peace.

Imagine “Stop the War on Yemeni Babies!” blazoned across the web instead of “Stop Hillary!” Or “Don’t Let the CIA Arm Al Qaeda in Syria” instead of “Don’t Let the Establishment Steal the Nomination from Trump.”

An intense focus on policies over personas could really turn public sentiment against the actual
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Visualizing The History Of Credit Cards

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Today, credit cards are one of the most important sources of big bank profits. However, a look at the history of credit cards shows that things weren’t always that way.

As VisualCapitalist’s Jeff Desjardins points out, while it may seem today that credit is impersonal and calculated, credit was once a privilege built around personal trust and long-lasting relationships. In the late 19th century, stores began offering credit to their best and most trustworthy customers. Instead of paying each time they visited the shop, a regular could defer payments to the future by using store-issued metal coins or plates that had their account number engraved. Shops would record the purchase details, and add the cost of the item bought to the customer’s balance owed.

By the 1920s, shops started issuing paper cards instead of metal plates, but even these became cumbersome. Consumers had to hold different cards for each shop, and this made the sector ripe for disruption.

Diners Club, the first independent credit card company in the world, did just that in the 1950s. Their cards allowed people to make travel and entertainment purchases, even with different vendors.

Bank of America took this idea and ran with it, forever changing the history of credit cards. They launched the “BankAmericard” in Fresno, California, by sending it out to all 60,000 residents at once. Soon all consumers and vendors in the city were using the same card, and the concept of mass-mailing cards to the public spread like a wildfire.

After these risky mass mailings of credit cards eventually culminated in the Chicago Debacle of 1966, they were outlawed in the 1970s for causing “financial chaos”. With no applications required, many people including compulsive debtors, crooks, and narcotics addicts were able to receive easy credit. By the time such mass airdrops became illegal, 100 million cards had already been unleashed on the U.S. population without a need for an application.

In 1976, the BankAmericard system eventually became Visa. It was soon after this point that credit cards would enter their golden age for banks: as savings rates fell in the early 1980s, the interest rates on debt did not. Credit cards became a “cash cow”, and they’ve been a key source of bank profits ever since.

Today, 80% of U.S. households own multiple cards,
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What Is The Worst-Case Outcome Of Helicopter Money: Deutsche Bank Explains

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Now that the next and final phase of unorthodox monetary policy, i.e., helicopter money, has had the blessing of both Mario Draghi and Ben Bernanke, and is virtually assured, there are three questions: how to trade it; where will it be implemented first (and certainly not last), and how will it all end.

We covered the first part, how to trade it, late on Friday, courtesy of a Deutsche Bank report titled, don’t laugh, “Helicopters 101: your guide to monetary financing

The next question then is: who will be (un)lucky enough to draw the first straw. The answer, according to DB, will be the same bank that as we shockingly reported at the end of January, was peer pressured into NIRP by Davos bankers, the Bank of Japan.

Global monetary policy is at a cross-roads. Japan’s experience this year demonstrates the limits of central bank policy with the bank running out of government bonds to buy, negative rates reaching their limits and inflation expectations having almost completely unwound their Abenomics move higher…. with Japan fast approaching the limits of its existing policy response to deflation, developments need to be followed closely for signs of the next global policy innovation.

Well, “policy innovation” sure is a polite way of putting “last ditch monetary idiocy” (the same idiocy which we predicted all the way back in March 2009 will be the ultimate endgame) but besides that we agree with Deutsche Bank: Japan will be the first nation to unveil helicopter money. After all, if it isn’t monetary or Keynesian experimentation, then simple demographics will destroy the nation… unless the Fukushima fallout doesn’t do it first.

Finally, how would helicopter money failure look like? Here are some ideas from DB’s George Saravelos:

A “successful” helicopter drop, defined as generating higher growth and inflation expectations but without a permanent overshoot of the inflation target, should lead to higher and steeper yield curves, a weaker currency (at least initially) and higher equity valuations.

This notwithstanding, it is important to emphasize that there are alternative equilibria too. At one extreme, if the policy is not perceived as sufficient in size and impact, then the supply/demand imbalances in fixed income may be exacerbated (less issuance and debt


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Rousseff Party Admits Impeachment Vote Is Lost; Brazil ETF Surges

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Update 2: While the official voting process continues and still about another 40 or so votes are needed before the formal threshold to impeach Dilma Rousseff of 342 is crossed, moments ago the leader of Rousseff’s lower house party, Gumaraes, threw in the towel and admitted the vote is lost:

  • ROUSSEFF’S LOWER HOUSE LEADER SAYS IMPEACHMENT VOTE IS LOST
  • BRAZIL’S GUIMARAES: THE COUP PLANNERS WON IN THE LOWER HOUSE

What happens next? The Senate showdown, and Rousseff who as we warned previously, will not go quietly:

  • GUIMARAES: IT WILL BE A SLOW, GRADUAL, SECURE, PROLONGED WAR

For now however, bizarro world continues and as Brazil is about to plunge into an even deeper political crisis, the Brazilian stock ETF has surged 4.5% in Japan trading on hopes the removal of Rousseff will somehow fix the Brazilian economy overnight. It won’t, and if anything the 2016 Olympic games now appear more in jeopardy than ever.

* * *

Update: moments ago the Brazilian Congress began its impeachment vote. 504 members of the lower house of Congress are present for the vote, with nine absent.  It appears that the 500+ members of Brazil’s lower house will vote 1-by-1, giving little mini-speeches each time.As we reported earlier below, newspaper surveys showed the opposition has only a few votes more than the two-thirds majority needed among 513 deputies to put Rousseff to trial in the Senate. 

* * *

As reported on Friday afternoon, ahead of Dilma Rousseff’s impeachment vote to be held in Brazil’s Congress later today, a critical threshold was passed when, according to local Folha newspaper, more than the required 342 votes had been gathered.

Sure enough, today all the main Brazilian newspapers dedicate their entire covers to impeachment, with Folha and Estado bringing nominal list of lawmakers’ expected votes for and against, Bloomberg reports. Furthermore, according to the latest tallies from Folha, Estado and Globo the “For” impeachment vote is currently anywhere between 347 and 350 votes, above the 342 needed.

But while the popular sentiment is largely in the pro-impeachment camp (even if many of those standing to benefit from Rousseff’s ouster have been alleged to be as corrupt with participation in either the Carwash scandal, or to have funds parked…
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Absurdity: When The Con Believes The Con

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Authored by Mark St.Cyr,

There are many infamous con games that have been foisted upon the public for millennia. Probably none more enduring than that of Charles Ponzi which bears his name as its moniker. Yet, there’s also been another who was also just as “daring” when it came to finding ways as to extract monetary gains by ill-gotten means: Victor Lustig.

Lustig is best known as “The man who sold the Eiffel Tower.” However, it was one of his other cons that came to mind as I was thinking about the current state of monetary policy we now find ourselves in.

Lustig’s other con was a device he slated would print $100 bills. But it had a problem.

Unbeknown to his mark, this problem was also part of the deception. The problem was (as stated by Lustig) – it could only print 1 bill every 6 hours. The genius was; located within the machine it contained two genuine $100 bills. After that – blanks. You could be long gone, and quite far with that kind of head start back then. Yet, it’s once the con, ruse, or scam is finally exposed one thing is certain: You don’t want to still be around or found.

As with any con game the perpetrator knows it’s all a con. In other words, “Duh!” Yet, if you listen closely to both past as well as present Fed. members you can’t help but notice by way of their current arguments, as well as, proposals for future monetary policy. The one’s who’ve truly bought into “the con” is: themselves!

Nowhere has this been on display more than the current public writings and musings of former Fed. Chair Ben Bernanke.

If you read his latest (which I’ve tried but can’t bear that much comedy in one sitting) he lays out what he thinks (or believes) should now take place involving Congress, the Administration, and the Fed. His great idea? Create and “fill” some arbitrary account which only the Fed. or its appointed designates have control of as to “empty” or “fill” as “Congress and Administration” see fit. But here’s the punchline, ready?

“Importantly, the Congress and Administration would have the option to leave the funds unspent. If the funds were not used within a specified time, the Fed
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“This Will All Blow Up In The Fed’s Face,” Schiff Warns “Trump’s Right, America Is Broke”

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Euro Pacific Capital’s Peter Schiff sat down with Alex Jones last week to discuss the state of the economy, and where he sees everything going from here.

Here are some notable moments from the interview.

Regarding how bad things are, and what’s really going on in the economy, Schiff lays out all of the horrible economic data that has come out recently, as well as making sure to take away the crutch everyone uses to explain any and all data misses, which is weather.

“It’s no way to know exactly the timetable, but obviously this economy is already back in recession, and if it’s not in a recession it’s certainly on the cusp of one”

“We could be in a negative GDP quarter right now, and I think that if the first quarter is bad the second quarter is going to be worse”

The last couple years we had a rebound in the second quarter because we’ve had very cold winters. Well this winter was the warmest in 120 years so there is nothing to rebound from.

On the Fed, and current policies, he very bluntly points out that nothing is working, nor has it worked, but of course the central planners will try it all anyway. He also takes a moment to agree with Donald Trump regarding the fact that the U.S. is flat out, undeniably broke.

“The problem for the fed is how do they launch a new round of stimulus and still pretend the economy is in good shape.”

“Negative interest rates are a disaster. It’s not working in Japan, it’s not working in Europe, it’s not going to work here. Just because it doesn’t work doesn’t mean we’re not going to do it, because everything we do doesn’t work and we do it anyway. It shows desperation, that you’ve had all these central bankers lowering interest rates and expecting it to revive the economy. And then when they get down to zero, rather than admit that it didn’t work, because clearly if you go to zero and you still haven’t achieved your objective, maybe it doesn’t work. Instead of admitting that they were wrong, they’re now going negative.”

“The United States, no matter how high inflation gets, we’ll do our best to pretend it doesn’t exist or rationalize it


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Goldman On Doha: “Bearish For Prices “, Expect “High Price Volatility”; Saudi Oil Production May Jump

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

When it comes to skewering logic, cause and effect, and simple facts, nobody does it quite like Goldman. Which is why when we got the just released post-mortem of the Doha deal from Goldman’s energy analysts Courvalin and Jeffrey “short gold” Currie, we fully expected them to spin today’s unprecedented OPEC failure into a bullish catalyst. Not even they were so bold. However, since Goldman apparently still has some more oil left to sell, it does spin the ongoing Kuwait strike into a catalyst that is “bullish fundamentals” and may offset some of the negative sentiment from the oil price collapse in the aftermath of what has been the most anticlimiatic two-month buildup in OPEC history.

The one piece in the below report that is not pure “duh” (or rather “D’oh”) is Goldman’s warning that “we view risks to our Saudi forecast as skewed to the upside” – if indeed the warning by the Saudi deputy crown prince Mohammed bin Salman is a hint of what’s coming, and Saudi Arabia does boost oil production by 1MM barrels overnight as bin Salman casually hinted earlier in a Bloomberg interview, then watch out below, especially since the Kuwait strike which has taken 1.7mm b/d offline is precisely the opportunity the Saudis needs to really show the world how much extra oil they can produce.

Here is Goldman’s take:

Lack of OPEC freeze is bearish sentiment but Kuwait strike is bullish fundamentals

OPEC and several non-OPEC producers failed to reach an agreement to freeze production in Doha today, Sunday April 17. Participants commented on requiring more time to reach a deal although the key stumbling block appears to be the requirement by Saudi Arabia that Iran participates. Saudi’s stance is consistent with comments by deputy crown prince Mohammed bin Salman during two interviews with Bloomberg this month (April 1 and Thursday April 13) and goes against Iran’s long held goal to quickly increase production to recover market share. On its own, we view this outcome as bearish for oil prices given consensus expectations for a “soft guidance” freeze at January production levels. But this lack of an agreement does not imply that OPEC production will recover in the short-term, as the year-to-date stabilization owes to ongoing disruptions and maintenance rather than…
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Standing At The Crossroads

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by Lance Roberts via RealInvestmentAdvice.com,

Is The Bull Market Back, Or Is It A Trap?

I wish I had a more definitive answer for you this week, but the market is standing at the proverbial “crossroads” of bull and bear.

From a “fundamental” perspective there is not much good news. The past week we saw numerous companies beating extremely beaten down estimates. However, while JPM and C got a boost to their stock price, the actual earnings, revenue and profits trends were clearly negative.

But that is the new normal. We live in an environment where Central Banking has taken control of financial markets by leaving investors “no option” for a return on cash. Therefore, the “hope” remains that asset prices can remain detached from underlying fundamentals long enough for them to catch up.

As I noted last week:

“However, not surprisingly, shortly after I published the article I received numerous emails citing low interest rates, accounting rule changes, and debt-funded buybacks all as reasons why “this time is different.”  While such could possibly be true, it is worth noting that each of these supports are both artificial and finite in nature.

Currently, the aging U.S. economy, where productivity has exploded, wage growth has remained weak and whose households are weighed down by surging debt, remains mired in a slow-growth funk. This slow-growth funk has, in turn, put a powerful shareholder base to work increasing pressure on corporate managers not to invest, and to recycle capital into dividends and buybacks instead which has led to a record level of corporate debt.

These actions, as suggested above, are limited in nature. For a while, these devices kept ROE elevated, however, the efficacy of those actions have now been reached.”

Corporate-Profits-ROE-041416

“Importantly, profit margins and ROE are reasonably well-correlated which is what creates the perception that profit margins mean-revert. However, ROE is a better indicator of what is happening inside of corporate balance sheets more so than just profit margins. The current collapse in ROE is likely sending a much darker message about corporate health than profit margins currently. “

But despite collapsing profit margins, ROE, and surging corporate debt levels, asset prices remain near all-time highs. The chart below shows corporate profits after tax and eps as compared to asset prices. Historically, the detachment between
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Adam Parker Blows Up At Fake Contrarians Who “Only Care About Price”

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Several weeks ago, Morgan Stanley’s Adam Parker was comparing rally chasers to cockroaches (not so much due to their outward appearance or intellectual capacity but because of their desire to survive no matter where the next market nuke will blow up). Today, in his Sunday Note, the Morgan Stanley strategist appears to have a mini breakdown while slamming faux “original thinkers” who pretend to be contrarians, while merely perpetuating the status quo, and are “indistinguishable from consensus.” To wit:

Questions need to be asked, fundamentals need to be analyzed, data need to be gathered and compared to historical precedents in order to more accurately predict the patient’s future outcome. Nonetheless, the main questions investors ask us today seem to be about the exterior appearance of the market and not fundamentals. “What is this price action telling you?” “What are other investors asking you about?” “How are other people positioned?” Or, “what’s the current sentiment?” They start by saying “I’m a contrarian investor by nature” and then go on to say the same thing about their view that we have heard in several previous meetings. Romanticizing that you are a contrarian when you are indistinguishable from consensus can’t be good.

They are looking at the price, or external appearance, in making their forecasts and not the fundamentals.

Parker’s rant also touches on some other… nuanced topics, such as fat gluttons buying stocks without reading financial statements, or something like that…

* * *

The Stock Market Doctor, by MS’ Adam Parker

An obese person who doesn’t eat for three weeks can be close to starvation. An extremely skinny person can still be uncomfortably full. Clearly, a doctor assessing these patients solely through a check of external appearances will frequently make the wrong diagnosis and prognosis and prescribe inaccurate treatments. Questions need to be asked, fundamentals need to be analyzed, data need to be gathered and compared to historical precedents in order to more accurately predict the patient’s future outcome.

Nonetheless, the main questions investors ask us today seem to be about the exterior appearance of the market and not fundamentals. “What is this price action telling you?” “What are other investors asking you about?” “How are other people positioned?” Or, “what’s the current sentiment?” They start by saying “I’m
continue reading





Adam Parker Blows Up At Fake Contrarians Who Are “Indistinguishable From Consensus”, Only Care About Price

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Several weeks ago, Morgan Stanley’s Adam Parker was comparing rally chasers to cockroaches (not so much due to their outward appearance or intellectual capacity but because of their desire to survive no matter where the next market nuke will blow up). Today, in his Sunday Note, the Morgan Stanley strategist appears to have a mini breakdown while slamming faux “original thinkers” who pretend to be contrarians, while merely perpetuating the status quo, and are “indistinguishable from consensus.” To wit:

Questions need to be asked, fundamentals need to be analyzed, data need to be gathered and compared to historical precedents in order to more accurately predict the patient’s future outcome. Nonetheless, the main questions investors ask us today seem to be about the exterior appearance of the market and not fundamentals. “What is this price action telling you?” “What are other investors asking you about?” “How are other people positioned?” Or, “what’s the current sentiment?” They start by saying “I’m a contrarian investor by nature” and then go on to say the same thing about their view that we have heard in several previous meetings. Romanticizing that you are a contrarian when you are indistinguishable from consensus can’t be good.

They are looking at the price, or external appearance, in making their forecasts and not the fundamentals.

Parker’s rant also touches on some other… nuanced topics, such as fat gluttons buying stocks without reading financial statements, or something like that…

* * *

The Stock Market Doctor, by MS’ Adam Parker

An obese person who doesn’t eat for three weeks can be close to starvation. An extremely skinny person can still be uncomfortably full. Clearly, a doctor assessing these patients solely through a check of external appearances will frequently make the wrong diagnosis and prognosis and prescribe inaccurate treatments. Questions need to be asked, fundamentals need to be analyzed, data need to be gathered and compared to historical precedents in order to more accurately predict the patient’s future outcome.

Nonetheless, the main questions investors ask us today seem to be about the exterior appearance of the market and not fundamentals. “What is this price action telling you?” “What are other investors asking you about?” “How are other people positioned?” Or, “what’s the current sentiment?” They start by saying “I’m
continue reading





 
 
 

ValueWalk

#1 Performing Global Macro Hedge Fund Sees More Shorts Opportunities Ahead As China Bursts

By Jacob Wolinsky. Originally published at ValueWalk.

Crescat Global Macro Fund update to investors on 1/19/2019

Crescat Global Macro Fund and Crescat Long/Short fund delivered strong returns for both December and full year 2018 in a difficult market. Based on ...



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Zero Hedge

Johns Hopkins, Bristol-Myers Face $1 Billion Suit For Infecting Guatemalan Hookers With Syphilis 

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

A federal judge in Maryland said Johns Hopkins University, pharmaceutical company Bristol-Myers Squibb and the Rockefeller Foundation must face a $1 billion lawsuit over their roles in a top-secret program in the 1940s ran by the US government that injected hundreds of Guatemalans with syphilis, reported Reuters.

Several doctors from Hopkins an...



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Phil's Favorites

Divisive economics

 

Guest author David Brin — scientist, technology consultant, best-selling author and futurist — explores the records of Democrats and Republicans on the US economy in the following post. For David's latest posts, visit the CONTRARY BRIN blog. For his books and short stories, visit his web...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

Stock declines did not break 9-year support, says Joe Friday

Courtesy of Chris Kimble.

We often hear “Stocks take an escalator up and an elevator down!” No doubt stocks did experience a swift decline from the September highs to the Christmas eve lows. Looks like the “elevator” part of the phrase came true as 2018 was coming to an end.

The first part of the “stocks take an escalator up” seems to still be in play as well despite the swift decline of late.

Joe Friday Just The Facts Ma’am- All of these indices hit long-term rising support on Christmas Eve at each (1), where support held and rallies have followed.

If you find long-term perspectives helpf...



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Digital Currencies

Transparency and privacy: Empowering people through blockchain

 

Transparency and privacy: Empowering people through blockchain

Blockchain technologies can empower people by allowing them more control over their user data. Shutterstock

Courtesy of Ajay Kumar Shrestha, University of Saskatchewan

Blockchain has already proven its huge influence on the financial world with its first application in the form of cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin. It might not be long before its impact is felt everywhere.

Blockchain is a secure chain of digital records that exist on multiple computers simultaneously so no record can be erased or falsified. The...



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Insider Scoop

Cars.com Explores Strategic Alternatives, Analyst Sees Possible Sale Price Around $30 Per Share

Courtesy of Benzinga.

Related 44 Biggest Movers From Yesterday 38 Stocks Moving In Wednesday's Mid-Day Session ...

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Chart School

Weekly Market Recap Jan 13, 2019

Courtesy of Blain.

In last week’s recap we asked:  “Has the Fed solved all the market’s problems in 1 speech?”

Thus far the market says yes!  As Guns n Roses preached – all we need is a little “patience”.  Four up days followed by a nominal down day Friday had the market following it’s normal pattern the past nearly 30 years – jumping whenever the Federal Reserve hints (or essentially says outright) it is here for the markets.   And in case you missed it the prior Friday, Chairman Powell came back out Thursday to reiterate the news – so…so… so… patient!

Fed Chairman Jerome Powell reinforced that message Thursday during a discussion at the Economic Club of Washington where he said that the central bank will be “fle...



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Members' Corner

Why Trump Can't Learn

 

Bill Eddy (lawyer, therapist, author) predicted Trump's chaotic presidency based on his high-conflict personality, which was evident years ago. This post, written in 2017, references a prescient article Bill wrote before Trump even became president, 5 Reasons Trump Can’t Learn. ~ Ilene 

Why Trump Can’t Learn

Donald Trump by Gage Skidmore (...



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Biotech

Opening Pandora's Box: Gene editing and its consequences

Reminder: We are available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

Opening Pandora's Box: Gene editing and its consequences

Bacteriophage viruses infecting bacterial cells , Bacterial viruses. from www.shutterstock.com

Courtesy of John Bergeron, McGill University

Today, the scientific community is aghast at the prospect of gene editing to create “designer” humans. Gene editing may be of greater consequence than climate change, or even the consequences of unleashing the energy of the atom.

...

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Mapping The Market

Trump: "I Won't Be Here" When It Blows Up

By Jean-Luc

Maybe we should simply try him for treason right now:

Trump on Coming Debt Crisis: ‘I Won’t Be Here’ When It Blows Up

The president thinks the balancing of the nation’s books is going to, ultimately, be a future president’s problem.

By Asawin Suebsaeng and Lachlan Markay, Daily Beast

The friction came to a head in early 2017 when senior officials offered Trump charts and graphics laying out the numbers and showing a “hockey stick” spike in the nationa...



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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of September 11th, 2017

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Promotions

Free eBook - "My Top Strategies for 2017"

 

 

Here's a free ebook for you to check out! 

Phil has a chapter in a newly-released eBook that we think you’ll enjoy.

In My Top Strategies for 2017, Phil's chapter is Secret Santa’s Inflation Hedges for 2017.

This chapter isn’t about risk or leverage. Phil present a few smart, practical ideas you can use as a hedge against inflation as well as hedging strategies designed to assist you in staying ahead of the markets.

Some other great content in this free eBook includes:

 

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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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