Guest View
User: Pass: | become a member
Author Archive for Chart School

The Big Four Economic Indicators: Real Retail Sales

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Note from dshort: With yesterday’s release of the Consumer Price Index for October, I’ve updated Real Retail Sales for October.


Official recession calls are the responsibility of the NBER Business Cycle Dating Committee, which is understandably vague about the specific indicators on which they base their decisions. This committee statement is about as close as they get to identifying their method.

There is, however, a general belief that there are four big indicators that the committee weighs heavily in their cycle identification process. They are:

  • Industrial Production
  • Real Personal Income (excluding Transfer Payments)
  • Nonfarm Employment
  • Real Retail Sales
  • The Latest Indicator Data

    Real Retail Sales will be especially interesting to watch over the coming months. The rather dramatic decline in gasoline prices in recent months will no doubt boost discretionary spending, and we’re now entering the merry season holiday spending. After a strong August report, September real sales were surprisingly weak, but October has seen a partial bounce back in spending. Will holiday sales, with the advantage of lower gas prices, put this indicator on a trend of stronger growth? One potential obstacle would be another savage winter such as we saw last year. The odds of a repeat of that severity are no doubt low. However, recent news items about the lake-effect blzzard in Buffalo, serve as a “chilling reminder” that weather can play a factor in the economy.

    The Generic Big Four

    The chart and table below illustrate the performance of the generic Big Four with an overlay of a simple average of the four since the end of the Great Recession. The data points show the cumulative percent change from a zero starting point for June 2009. We now have the three indicator updates for the 61th month following the recession. The Big Four Average is (gray line below).

    Current Assessment and Outlook

    The overall picture of the US economy had been one of slow recovery from the Great Recession with a clearly documented contraction during the winter, as reflected in Q1 GDP. Data for Q2 supported the consensus view that severe winter weather was responsible for the…
    continue reading





    ECRI Recession Watch: Weekly Update

    Courtesy of Doug Short.

    The Weekly Leading Index (WLI) of the Economic Cycle Research Institute (ECRI) is at 133.2, up from the previous week’s 132.0. The WLI annualized growth indicator (WLIg) is at -2.4, down from -2.9 the previous week.

    ECRI has been at the center of a prolonged controversy since publicizing its recession call on September 30, 2011. The company had made the announcement to its private clients on September 21st. ECRI’s cofounder and spokesman, Lakshman Achuthan, subsequently forecast that the recession would begin in Q1 2012, or Q2 at the latest. He later identified mid-2012 as the start of the recession. Over the past two years he has been a frequent guest on the likes of CNBC and Bloomberg TV. In recent months he has adjusted the company’s position, identifying the recession’s “epicenter” as the half-year spanning Q4 2012 and Q1 2013.

    Focus on Japan

    ECRI’s latest public statements have focused on Japan. The website now features a November 17th response to the announcement of Japan’s Fourth Recession Since 2008. Also Lakshman Achuthan made a November 19th Al Jazeera guest appearance on topic Japan’s Recession and the global slowdown. You can view the video on the ECRI website.

    The ECRI Indicator Year-over-Year

    Below is a chart of ECRI’s data that illustrates why the company’s published proprietary indicator has lost credibility as a recession indicator. It’s the smoothed year-over-year percent change since 2000 of their weekly leading index. I’ve highlighted the 2011 date of ECRI’s original recession call and the hypothetical July 2012 business cycle peak, which the company previously claimed was the start of a recession. I’ve update the chart to include the “epicenter” (Achuthan’s terminology) of the hypothetical recession.

    Click to View
    Click for a larger image

    As for the disconnect between the stock market and the mid-2012 recession start date, Achuthan has repeatedly pointed out that the market can rise during recessions. See for example the 2:05 minute point in the November 4th video. The next chart gives us a visualization of the S&P 500 during the nine recessions since the S&P 500 was initiated in 1957. I’ve included a dotted line to show how the index has performed since ERIC’s original July 2012 recession start…
    continue reading





    Five Decades of Middle Class Wages: Update

    Courtesy of Doug Short.

    Note from dshort: I’ve updated this series to include yesterday’s release of the October Consumer Price Index.


    Here’s a perspective on personal income for production and nonsupervisory private employees going back five decades.

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics has been collecting data on this workforce cohort since 1964. The government numbers provide some excellent insights on the income history of what we might think of as the private middle class wage earner.

    The first snapshot shows the growth of average hourly earnings. The nominal data exhibits a relatively smooth upward trend.

    Click to View
    Click for a larger image

    There are, however, two critical pieces of information that dramatically alter the nominal series: The average hours per week and 2) inflation.

    The average hours per week has trended in quite a different direction, from around 39 hours per week in the mid-1960s to a low of 33 hours at the end of the last recession. The post-recession recovery has seen a disappointingly trivial 0.8 bounce (that’s 48 minutes).

    Click to View
    Click for a larger image

    What about inflation? The next chart adjusts hourly earnings to the purchasing power of today’s dollar. I’ve use the familiar Consumer Price Index for Urban Consumers (usually abbreviated as the CPI) for the adjustment with a linear extrapolation for the latest month. Theoretically, the CPI is designed to reflect the cost-of-living for metropolitan-area households.

    Click to View
    Click for a larger image

    Now let’s multiply the real average hourly earnings by the average hours per week. We thus get a hypothetical number for average weekly wages of this middle-class cohort, currently at $700 — well below its $827 peak back in the early 1970s.

    Click to View
    Click for a larger image

    Note that this is a gross income number that doesn’t include any tax withholding or other deductions. Disposable income would be noticeably lower.

    Latest Hypothetical Annual Earnings: $34,983, Down 15.4% from 42 Years Ago

    If we multiply the hypothetical weekly earnings…
    continue reading





    Vehicle Miles Traveled: A Structural Change in Our Behavior

    Courtesy of Doug Short.

    The Department of Transportation’s Federal Highway Commission has released the latest report on Traffic Volume Trends, data through September.

    Travel on all roads and streets changed by 2.3% (5.6 billion vehicle miles) for September 2014 as compared with September 2013 (see report). The less volatile 12-month moving average is up 0.19% month-over-month. If we factor in population growth, the 12-month MA of the civilian population-adjusted data (age 16-and-over) is up 0.10% month-over-month and down 0.2% year-over-year.

    Here is a chart that illustrates this data series from its inception in 1970. I’m plotting the “Moving 12-Month Total on ALL Roads,” as the DOT terms it. My start date is 1971 because I’m incorporating all the available data from earlier DOT spreadsheets. The FRED repository has the series from 1987 to the latest update. As we can readily see, the post-recession pattern suggests a structural change in our driving habits.

    Click to View
    Click for a larger image

    The rolling 12-month miles traveled contracted from its all-time high for 39 months during the stagflation of the late 1970s to early 1980s, a double-dip recession era. The most recent decline has lasted for 82 months and counting — a new record, but the trough to date was in November 2011, 48 months from the all-time high.

    The Population-Adjusted Reality

    Total Miles Traveled, however, is one of those metrics that should be adjusted for population growth to provide the most meaningful analysis, especially if we want to understand the historical context. We can do a quick adjustment of the data using an appropriate population group as the deflator. I use the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Civilian Noninstitutional Population Age 16 and Over (FRED series CNP16OV). The next chart incorporates that adjustment with the growth shown on the vertical axis as the percent change from 1971.

    Click to View
    Click for a larger image

    Clearly, when we adjust for population growth, the Miles-Traveled metric takes on a much darker look. The nominal 39-month dip that began in May 1979 grows to 61 months, slightly more than five years. The trough was a 6% decline from the previous peak.


    continue reading





    A Long-Term Look at Inflation

    Courtesy of Doug Short.

    The Consumer Price Index for Urban Consumers (CPI-U) released this morning puts the October year-over-year inflation rate at 1.66%, off the May 19-month high of 2.13%. It is well below the 3.86% average since the end of the Second World War and 29 percent below its 10-year moving average.

    For a comparison of headline inflation with core inflation, which is based on the CPI excluding food and energy, see this monthly feature.

    For better understanding of how CPI is measured and how it impacts your household, see my Inside Look at CPI components.

    For an even closer look at how the components are behaving, see this X-Ray View of the data for the past six months.

    The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) has compiled CPI data since 1913, and numbers are conveniently available from the FRED repository (here). My long-term inflation charts reach back to 1872 by adding Warren and Pearson’s price index for the earlier years. The spliced series is available at Yale Professor (and Nobel laureate) Robert Shiller’s website. This look further back into the past dramatically illustrates the extreme oscillation between inflation and deflation during the first 70 years of our timeline. Click here for additional perspectives on inflation and the shrinking value of the dollar.

    Click to View
    Click for a larger image

    Alternate Inflation Data

    The chart below (click here for a larger version) includes an alternate look at inflation *without* the calculation modifications the 1980s and 1990s (Data from www.shadowstats.com).

    Click to View
    Click for a larger image

    On a personal note, I believe the current BLS method of calculating inflation is reasonably sound. As a first-wave Boomer who raised a family during the double-digit inflation years of the 1970s and early 1980s, I see nothing today that is remotely like the inflation we endured at that time. Moreover, government policy, the Federal Funds Rate, interest rates in general and decades of major business decisions have been fundamentally driven by the official BLS inflation data, not the alternate CPI. For this reason I view the alternate inflation data as an interesting but ultimately useless statistical series.

    That said, I think…
    continue reading





    Inflation: A Six-Month X-Ray View

    Courtesy of Doug Short.

    Here is a table showing the annualized change in Headline and Core CPI, not seasonally adjusted, for each of the past six months. I’ve also included each of the eight components of Headline CPI and a separate entry for Energy, which is a collection of sub-indexes in Housing and Transportation.

    We can make some inferences about how inflation is impacting our personal expenses depending on our relative exposure to the individual components. Some of us have higher transportation costs, others medical costs, etc.

    A conspicuous feature in the table through the latest data is the volatility of energy, essentially the fluctuation in gasoline prices, which is also reflected in Transportation.

    Here is the same table with month-over-month numbers (not seasonally adjusted). The change in energy costs is clearly illustrated, reflected here too in transportation.

    The Trends in Headline and Core CPI

    The chart below shows Headline and Core CPI for urban consumers since 2007. Core CPI excludes the two most volatile components, food and energy. I’ve highlighted the 2% to 2.5% range that the FOMC targeted in their December 12, 2012 press release, although the Fed has traditionally used the Personal Consumption Expenditure (PCE) price index as their preferred inflation gauge.

    Click to View
    Click for a larger image

    Year-over-year Core CPI (the blue line) made a moderate arc above the 2% benchmark beginning October of 2011. It dropped below the 2% – 2.5% range in August of 2012, but grazed the bottom of that range in February and July of last year. Core CPI has been below 2% for 26 of the last 30 months. The more volatile Headline CPI has spent 27 of the past of the past 30 months under the 2% lower benchmark. Much of the volatility in the past few years has been the result of broad swings in gasoline prices (more on gasoline here).

    For a longer-term perspective, here is a column-style breakdown of the inflation categories showing the change since 2000.

    Click to View
    Click for a larger image

    Note: For additional information on the component composition of the Consumer Price Index, see my Inside the Consumer Price Index.





    What Inflation Means to You: Inside the Consumer Price Index

    Courtesy of Doug Short.

    Note from dshort : The charts in this commentary have been updated to include today’s Consumer Price Index news release for the October data.

    The Fed justified a previous round of quantitative easing “to promote a stronger pace of economic recovery and to help ensure that inflation, over time, is at levels consistent with its mandate” (full text). In effect, the Fed has been trying to increase inflation, operating at the macro level. But what does an increase in inflation mean at the micro level — specifically to your household?

    Let’s do some analysis of the Consumer Price Index, the best known measure of inflation. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) divides all expenditures into eight categories and assigns a relative size to each. The pie chart below illustrates the components of the Consumer Price Index for Urban Consumers, the CPI-U, which I’ll refer to hereafter as the CPI.

    The slices are listed in the order used by the BLS in their tables, not the relative size. The first three follow the traditional order of urgency: food, shelter, and clothing. Transportation comes before Medical Care, and Recreation precedes the lumped category of Education and Communication. Other Goods and Services refers to a bizarre grab-bag of odd fellows, including tobacco, cosmetics, financial services, and funeral expenses. For a complete breakdown and relative weights of all the subcategories of the eight categories, here is a useful link.

    The chart below shows the cumulative percent change in price for each of the eight categories since 2000.

    Click to View
    Click for a larger image

    Not surprisingly, Medical Care has been the fastest growing category. At the opposite end, Apparel has actually been deflating since 2000. Another unique feature of Apparel is the obvious seasonal volatility of the contour.

    Transportation is the other category with high volatility — much more dramatic and irregular than the seasonality of Apparel. Transportation includes a wide range of subcategories. The volatility is largely driven by the Motor Fuel subcategory. For a closer look at gasoline, see this chart in my weekly gasoline update.

    The Ominous Shadow Category of Energy

    The BLS does not lump energy costs into an expenditure category. Instead, it includes energy subcategories in Housing in addition to the fuel…
    continue reading





    Conference Board Leading Economic Index Increased Again in October

    Courtesy of Doug Short.

    The Latest Conference Board Leading Economic Index (LEI) for October is now available. The index rose 0.9 percent to 105.5. September was revised downward to 104.3 percent (2004 = 100). The latest number came in above the 0.6 percent forecast by Investing.com.

    Here is an overview from the LEI technical notes:

    The Conference Board LEI for the U.S. increased sharply in October. This month’s gain was driven by large positive contributions from the yield spread, the ISM® new orders index and weekly initial claims for unemployment insurance (inverted). In the six-month period ending October 2014, the leading economic index increased 4.0 percent (about an 8.1 percent annual rate), faster than the growth of 2.7 percent (about a 5.6 percent annual rate) over the previous six months. In addition, the strengths among its components have become very widespread in recent months. [Full notes in PDF]

    Here is a chart of the LEI series with documented recessions as identified by the NBER.

    Click to View
    Click for a larger image

    And here is a closer look at this indicator since 2000. We can more readily see that the recovery from the 2000 trough weakened in 2012 but began trending higher in the latter part of the year.

    Click to View
    Click for a larger image

    For a more details on the latest data, here is an excerpt from the press release:

    “The LEI rose sharply in October, with all components gaining over the previous six months,” said Ataman Ozyildirim, Economist at The Conference Board. “Despite a negative contribution from stock prices in October, and minimal contributions from new orders for consumer goods and average workweek in manufacturing, the LEI suggests the U.S. expansion continues to be strong.”

    “The upward trend in the LEI points to continued economic growth through the holiday season and into early 2015,” said Ken Goldstein, Economist at The Conference Board. “This is consistent with our outlook for relatively good, but not great, consumer demand over the near term. Going forward, there are continued concerns about slow business investment and lackluster income growth.”

    For a…
    continue reading





    Philly Fed Business Outlook: Growth Surges; General Activity Highest Since 1993

    Courtesy of Doug Short.

    Note from Doug: Having lived for two wonderful years in Paoli, PA, a suburb west of Philadelphia just south of Valley Forge, I have a special interest in this regional indicator. But, more importantly, it gives a generally reliable clue as to direction of the broader Chicago Fed’s National Activity Index.


    The Philly Fed’s Business Outlook Survey is a monthly report for the Third Federal Reserve District, covers eastern Pennsylvania, southern New Jersey, and Delaware. The latest gauge of General Activity came in at 40.8, a surge over last month’s 20.7. The 3-month moving average came in at 28.0, up from 23.7 last month. Since this is a diffusion index, negative readings indicate contraction, positive ones indicate expansion. The Six-Month Outlook slipped to 48.0 from last month’s 54.5.

    Here is the introduction from the Business Outlook Survey released today:

    Responses to the Manufacturing Business Outlook Survey suggest that regional manufacturing activity increased notably in November. The survey’s broad indicators for new orders and shipments showed similar improvement this month. Responding firms also indicated that employment was higher this month. In addition, the broadest indicator of future activity suggests that firms expect growth to continue over the next six months. (Full PDF Report)

    Today’s 40.8 came in substantially above the 18.5 forecast at Investing.com. It is the highest General Activity reading since December 1993.

    The first chart below gives us a look at this diffusion index since 2000, which shows us how it has behaved in proximity to the two 21st century recessions. The red dots show the indicator itself, which is quite noisy, and the 3-month moving average, which is more useful as an indicator of coincident economic activity. We can see periods of contraction in 2011 and 2012 and a shallower contraction in 2013. The indicator is now above its post-contraction peak in September of last year.

    Click to View
    Click for a larger image

    In the next chart we see the complete series, which dates from May 1960. The average absolute monthly change across this data series is 7.4, which shows that the 20.1 point change from last month is a an outlier.


    continue reading





    New Jobless Claims Come in a Bit Higher Than Forecast

    Courtesy of Doug Short.

    Here is the opening statement from the Department of Labor:

    In the week ending November 15, the advance figure for seasonally adjusted initial claims was 291,000, a decrease of 2,000 from the previous week’s revised level. The previous week’s level was revised up by 3,000 from 290,000 to 293,000. The 4-week moving average was 287,500, an increase of 1,750 from the previous week’s revised average. The previous week’s average was revised up by 750 from 285,000 to 285,750.

    There were no special factors impacting this week’s initial claims. [See full report]

    Today’s seasonally adjusted number at 291K was above the Investing.com forecast of 286K and Briefing.com was looking for 285K. The four-week moving average at 287.5K is now 8.5K above its 14-year interim low set two weeks ago.

    Here is a close look at the data over the past few years (with a callout for the past year), which gives a clearer sense of the overall trend in relation to the last recession and the volatility in recent months.

    Click to View
    Click for a larger image

    As we can see, there’s a good bit of volatility in this indicator, which is why the 4-week moving average (the highlighted number) is a more useful number than the weekly data. Here is the complete data series.

    Click to View
    Click for a larger image

    Occasionally I see articles critical of seasonal adjustment, especially when the non-adjusted number better suits the author’s bias. But a comparison of these two charts clearly shows extreme volatility of the non-adjusted data, and the 4-week MA gives an indication of the recurring pattern of seasonal change in the second chart (note, for example, those regular January spikes).

    Click to View
    Click for a larger image

    Because of the extreme volatility of the non-adjusted weekly data, a 52-week moving average gives a better sense of the secular trends. I’ve added a linear regression through the data. We can see that this metric continued to fall below the long-term trend stretching back to 1968.


    continue reading





     
     
     

    Stock World Weekly

    Stock World Weekly

    Newsletter writers are available to chat with Members regarding topics presented in SWW, comments are found below each post.

    Here's the Happy Thanksgiving Edition of Stock World Weekly!

    Click on this link and sign in with your PSW user name and password. 

    Picture via Pixabay.

    ...

    more from SWW

    Zero Hedge

    Pity the Sub-Genius

    Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

    Submitted by Tim Knight from Slope of Hope.

    From the Slope of Hope: They say be careful what you wish for. And, as is often the case, "they" are right.

    As a kid, I wished the world favored the smart. I was a smart kid, and it seemed like the world - at least my world - was dominated by bullies and airheads. Might made right, just like in the times of old. My high IQ and love of learning were no match for popular dolts, so a portion of my childhood was wasted just trying to disappear into the background.

    Unknown to me at the time, much of the adult world operated the same way. It didn't take a ...



    more from Tyler

    Phil's Favorites

    "Eagle Cam": Aerial View of London via Video Camera Attached to an Eagle

    Courtesy of Mish.

    An eagle got an impressive birds-eye-view of London this week, flying over the city's most iconic landmarks using a Sony HDR-AZ1VR Action Cam attached to its back.



    Link if video does not play: Action Cam Footage Shows Eagle Flying Over City of London

    The BBC reports Eagle With Camera Flies Over London
    An eagle with a camera attached has flown across London and offered a new perspective on some of the capital's best-known landmarks.

    The footage was recorded over a week by an Imperial Eagle called Darchan.

    The animal has been brought to London from the French Alps by The Freedom Project to mark the 50th anniversary of the International Union for Conservation of ...



    more from Ilene

    Market Shadows

    Official Moves in the Market Shadows' Virtual Portfolio

    By Ilene 

    I officially bought 250 shares of EZCH at $18.76 and sold 300 shares of IGT at $17.09 in Market Shadows' Virtual Portfolio yesterday (Fri. 11-21).

    Click here for Thursday's post where I was thinking about buying EZCH. After further reading, I decided to add it to the virtual portfolio and to sell IGT and several other stocks, which we'll be saying goodbye to next week.

    Notes

    1. th...



    more from Paul

    Chart School

    The Big Four Economic Indicators: Real Retail Sales

    Courtesy of Doug Short.

    Note from dshort: With yesterday's release of the Consumer Price Index for October, I've updated Real Retail Sales for October.

    Official recession calls are the responsibility of the NBER Business Cycle Dating Committee, which is understandably vague about the specific indicators on which they base their decisions. This committee statement is about as close as they get to identifying their method.

    There is, however, a general belief that there are four big indicators that the committee weighs heavily in their cycle identification process. They are:

    • Industrial Production
    • Real Personal Income (excluding Transfer Payments)
    • Nonfarm Employment
    • Real Retail Sales
    • ...

      more from Chart School

      All About Trends

      Mid-Day Update

      Reminder: David is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

      Click here for the full report.




      To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

      more from David

      OpTrader

      Swing trading portfolio - week of November 17th, 2014

      Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

       

      This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

      We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

      Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

      To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



      more from OpTrader

      Sabrient

      Sector Detector: Investors make up new rules for their new market paradigm

      Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

      Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

      By Scott Martindale

      Investors in U.S. equities seem to have embraced a new market paradigm in which upside spikes come more swiftly than the downside selloffs. Remember when it used to be the other way around? When fear was stronger than greed? The market is consolidating its gains off the early-October V-bottom reversal, and no one seems to be in any hurry to unload shares this time around, with the holidays rapidly approaching and all. After all, there are bright blue skies directly overhead giving hope and respite from the early freeze blanketing the country.

      In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer...



      more from Sabrient

      Digital Currencies

      Ukraine Central Bank Bans Bitcoin "To Protect Citizens" From Financing Terrorism

      If you would have supposed that Ukraine had enough problems to make banning bitcoins a backburner issue, you'd have been wrong. The rationale, "to protect consumers' rights" makes little to no sense... The other one, "to keep money in the country" makes more sense. 

      Ukraine Central Bank Bans Bitcoin "To Protect Citizens" From Financing Terrorism

      Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

      The Hryvnia has collapsed to new record lows near 15/USD this morning. The Central Bank and bankers "agreed to keep UAH at 15-16/USD" but are &qu...



      more from Bitcoin

      Option Review

      Yamana Gold call options sink

      Yamana Gold call options sink

      By Andrew Wilkinson at Interactive Brokers

      A four-year low for the spot price of gold has had a devastating impact on Yamana Gold (Ticker: AUY), with shares in the name down at the lowest price in six years. Some option traders were especially keen to sell premium and appear to see few signs of a lasting rebound within the next five months. The price of gold suffered again Wednesday as the dollar strengthened and stock prices advanced. The post price of gold fell to $1145 adding further pain to share prices of gold miners. Shares in Yamana Gold tumbled to $3.62 and the lowest price since 2008 as call option sellers used the April expiration contract to write premium at the $5.00 strike. That strike is now 38% above the price of the stock. Premium writers took in around 16-cents per contract o...



      more from Caitlin

      Pharmboy

      Biotechs & Bubbles

      Reminder: Pharmboy is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

      Well PSW Subscribers....I am still here, barely.  From my last post a few months ago to now, nothing has changed much, but there are a few bargins out there that as investors, should be put on the watch list (again) and if so desired....buy a small amount.

      First, the media is on a tear against biotechs/pharma, ripping companies for their drug prices.  Gilead's HepC drug, Sovaldi, is priced at $84K for the 12-week treatment.  Pundits were screaming bloody murder that it was a total rip off, but when one investigates the other drugs out there, and the consequences of not taking Sovaldi vs. another drug combinations, then things become clearer.  For instance, Olysio (JNJ) is about $66,000 for a 12-week treatment, but is approved for fewer types of patients AND...



      more from Pharmboy

      Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

      "Hello PSW Members –

      This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

      Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

      http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743

      Thank you for you time!




      FeedTheBull - Top Stock market and Finance Sites



      About Phil:

      Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

      Learn more About Phil >>


      As Seen On:




      About Ilene:

      Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

      Market Shadows >>