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3 Things Worth Thinking About (Volume 2)

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Advisor Perspectives welcomes guest contributions. The views presented here do not necessarily represent those of Advisor Perspectives.


Last week, I started a new weekly series entitled “3 Things Worth Thinking About”. The focus here will be three things, ironically enough, that are worth considering with respect to your portfolio and related investments. As I have discussed many times previously, focusing only on “bullish” commentary when markets are rising is really of little use as it creates a “blind spot” to related investment risks. The same goes for when markets are falling. These cognitive biases get in the way of making logical and disciplined investment decisions to not only garner returns when markets rise, but avoid depletion of capital when they don’t.

I hope you will enjoy this series, and I welcome your feedback or suggestions (email or tweet).


1) Effect Of Buybacks On Earnings & Revenue

Let me start by saying that I do not disagree that improving earnings and revenue have indeed been important to the rise of the markets over the last 5 years. However, impact of a surge in corporate borrowing in order to reduce outstanding shares has begun to distort the level of actual profitability of corporations. The chart below shows how share purchases have elevated both operating and reported earnings as well as revenue per share.

Click to View

The bullish argument used to support inflated asset prices has been the sharp improvement of “operating” [what would have been earned before all of this other stuff] earnings. While this is not incorrect, it is also important to understand the “quality” of those earnings as well. An increase in earnings by reducing outstanding shares did not increase the number of dollars actually earned.

This is an important concept because there is a major difference between what is happening at the bottom line of the income statement and the top line. While earnings can be inflated through the use of a myriad of accounting tactics, share manipulation and tax avoidance, (for more on this issue read “4 Tools Of Corporate Profitability”) there is little than can be done to boost actual sales. As shown in the chart below, sales per share growth has grossly lagged both earnings and the inflation of asset of prices.…
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A Perspective on Today’s Market Drama

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Note from dshort: A few minutes ago I received an email from Jason Leach, a copy of one that he had sent to clients earlier in the day. Given the drama of today’s market behavior, I found his analysis, shared below, quite fascinating.


The market began to sell off significantly in the overnight futures session last night (waking me as the S&P futures hit an alert I had set just 15 minutes before).

I arose to determine the cause(s) of the sell-off, and later the acceleration of the sell-off once the cash market opened this morning.

The causes include:

  • Multinational companies in Europe (Adidas, Anheuser-Busch Inbev) commenting on the Ukrainian conflict impacting their operations.
  • Russia responding to sanctions with some produce bans on Ukraine and Poland.
  • Argentina defaulting on its debt.
  • U.S. Employer Cost Index increasing more than expected this morning (indicating wage inflation could be picking up inciting fears of the Federal Reserve increasing rates sooner than expected).

Earlier this week, significant weakness in Industrials (breaking down out of a two year up channel), Consumer Staples, Energy, Semiconductors, and Homebuilders pointed to the market possibly having put in a near term top.

Yesterday, good GDP data and a Federal Reserve statement (that was relatively market friendly) were both met with selling across sectors.

Tomorrow is the once a month jobs report that could accelerate selling if interpreted to be too strong (rising rates are coming). Alternatively market participants may interpret it and other data positively and the brief sell-off could stop.

Our holdings, notably recent reporters Apple, Gilead, Amgen, and Facebook, are all reasonably cheap if not extremely so (GILD) and recently exhibited extremely strong earnings growth prospects, and strong price action. Along with TEVA, EOG Resources, JNJ, and others we want to hold these positions in portfolios long term.

Given the near term uncertain geo-political, economic and thus market situation, I took them off this morning looking to re-enter the positions once the aggressive selling ends.

I would emphasize that this period will be as short as possible as the companies mentioned above are undervalued given their earnings growth rates, relative P/E ratios and other metrics.

All dips in the markets have been brief over the past two years (due to Fed stimulus, corporate cost cutting and large stock buybacks). Until proven otherwise, and in spite of…
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Moving Averages: Month-End Update

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Valid until the market close on August 29, 2014

The S&P 500 closed July with a monthly loss of 1.51%. All three S&P 500 MAs and four of the five the Ivy Portfolio ETF MAs are signaling “Invested”.

The Ivy Portfolio

The table below shows the current 10-month simple moving average (SMA) signal for each of the five ETFs featured in The Ivy Portfolio. I’ve also included a table of 12-month SMAs for the same ETFs for this popular alternative strategy.

For a facinating analysis of the Ivy Portfolio strategy, see this article by Adam Butler, Mike Philbrick and Rodrigo Gordillo:

Backtesting Moving Averages

Monthly Close Signals Over the past few years I’ve used Excel to track the performance of various moving-average timing strategies. But now I use the backtesting tools available on the ETFReplay.com website. Anyone who is interested in market timing with ETFs should have a look at this website. Here are the two tools I most frequently use:

Background on Moving Averages

Buying and selling based on a moving average of monthly closes can be an effective strategy for managing the risk of severe loss from major bear markets. In essence, when the monthly close of the index is above the moving average value, you hold the index. When the index closes below, you move to cash. The disadvantage is that it never gets you out at the top or back in at the bottom. Also, it can produce the occasional whipsaw (short-term buy or sell signal), such as we’ve occasionally experienced over the past year.

Nevertheless, a chart of the S&P 500 monthly closes since 1995 shows that a 10- or 12-month simple moving average (SMA) strategy would have insured participation in most of the upside price movement while dramatically reducing losses.

The 10-month exponential moving average (EMA) is a slight variant on the simple moving average. This version mathematically increases the weighting of newer data in the 10-month sequence. Since 1995 it has produced fewer whipsaws than the equivalent simple moving average, although it was a month slower to signal a sell after these two market tops.

A look back at the 10-…
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S&P 500 Snapshot: Down for the Day and Month with a Bit of Drama

Courtesy of Doug Short.

US equity markets ended the month with a selloff. The S&P 500 and the Dow both posted their first monthly declines since January. The popular press has a grab-bag of explanations, most notably Argentina’s default, the chess match against Russia, and concerns that a Fed rate hike might come sooner than expected. The S&P 500 opened at its -0.25% intraday high and sold off in a couple of waves to its -2.00% close at its intraday low. The 1.79% daily trading range was at the 97th percentile for the year, and the daily decline was the fourth worst of 2014. The VIX volatility index was up 27.16%, by far its biggest jump of the year.

Interestingly enough, despite some morning volatility in the 10-year note yield index, the Treasury put the official closing yield at 2.58%, up a mere 1 bp from the previous close. It is now 14 bps above its interim closing low of May 28th.

Here is a 15-minute chart of the past five sessions. The S&P 500 is up 4.45% year-to-date.

We can see on a YTD daily chart that the index plunged dramatically below its 50-day moving average — something that happened once before this year, back in January. Volume was 37% above its 50-day moving average.

For a longer-term perspective, here is a pair of charts based on daily closes starting with the all-time high prior to the Great Recession.

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Daily Market Commentary: Bear Blitz

Courtesy of Declan.

Whatever tentative bullish plays were available before the start of the day were quickly put to rest by the close of business.  Where I thought the Dow might offer shorts the most reward, it was the Russell 2000 which suffered most. The Dow actually managed to close on a support level – although it probably doesn’t look like it.


The Russell 2000 was stung with a blowout of the mid-July swing low. One possibility is a measured move down, which projects down to 1,050, although the May swing low looks a more natural place for buyers to step in.

The semiconductor index is another index in trouble. It’s offering a measured move lower, projecting a target of 578. The 200-day MA and/or rising trendline, may rise to reach this level at the time of the test, offering additional support.

The Nasdaq dropped from one support level down to another. It currently trades at July’s two swing lows and the 20-day MA. While today didn’t offer the longside opportunity, tomorrow may offer more. Technicals are not as bearish as for other indices (but are weakening), and buyers have so far stepped in after nearly every big sell off.

The S&P sliced through its 50-day MA with relative ease, finishing technically net bearish. A move to 1,897 is one possibility given the lack of alternative support levels. Shorts will be looking for a bounce back to 1,960 before getting aggressive

As for tomorrow, some relief from the selling is probable, but bulls who were complacent before today will likely not be so now.  As for buying opportunities beyond a day trade, look for leadership from the Russell 2000 and Semiconductor Index – these are the indices most likely to find value buyers first.

Accepting KIVA gift certificates to help support the work on this blog. All certificates gifted are converted into loans for those who need the help more.





August 1914: When Global Stock Markets Closed

Courtesy of Doug Short.

This week marks the hundredth anniversary of the beginning of World War I. On June 28, 1914, Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated in Sarajevo. This event led to a month of failed diplomatic maneuvering between Austria-Hungary, Germany, France, Russia, and Britain which ended with the onset of the Great War, as it was originally called.

Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia on July 28, causing Germany and Russia to mobilize their armies on July 30. When Russia offered to negotiate rather than demobilize their army, Germany declared war on Russia on August 1. Germany declared war on France on August 3, and when Germany attacked Belgium on August 4, England declared war on Germany. Europe was at war, and millions would die in the battles that followed.

The impact on global stock markets was immediate: the closure of every major European exchange and many of the exchanges outside of Europe. Although no one would have predicted this result at the beginning of July 1914, by the end of the month, European stock exchanges were making preparations for the inevitable war and its impact.

Never before had all of Europe’s major exchanges closed simultaneously, but then again, never had such a global cataclysm struck the world. There had been crises before when the stock market in the United States or other countries had closed, such as the 1848 Revolution in France, or the Panic of 1873 in New York, but never had all the world’s major stock markets closed simultaneously.

Open Financial Markets Led to Closed Exchanges

Ironically, it was because of the openness of global financial markets before the war that the global closure of stock markets occurred. At the beginning of 1914, capital was free to flow from one country to another without hindrance. All the major countries of the world were on the Gold Standard, and differences in exchange rates were arbitraged through the buying and selling of international bonds listed on the world’s stock exchanges. A country such as Russia would issue a bond that was listed on the stock exchanges in London, New York, Paris, Berlin, Amsterdam and St. Petersburg. Differences in exchange rates between countries could be arbitraged by buying and selling bonds in different markets. In effect, this made European stock exchanges a single, integrated market.

In 1914, currency flowed between countries with lightning speed. During the Napoleonic…
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The BEA’s Q2 GDP: A Deeper Analysis

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Note from dshort: Here is the always-fascinating analysis of the BEA’s latest GDP report from the Consumer Metrics Institute.


In their first estimate of the US GDP for the second quarter of 2014, the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) reported that the economy was growing at a +3.94% annualized rate. When compared to the prior quarter, the new measurement is up over 6% from a -2.11% contraction rate for the 1st quarter of 2014 (which was itself revised upward +0.83% from a previously reported -2.94% contraction). This is the largest positive quarter to quarter improvement in GDP growth in some 14 years.

The largest contributions to the 2nd quarter 2014 +6% turnaround in the headline number were from inventories (+2.8%), exports (+2.5), consumer goods expenditures (+1.2%) and commercial fixed investments (+0.9%). Offsetting those positive quarter-to-quarter contribution changes were deteriorating imports (which weakened by -1.5%) and consumer expenditures for services (down -0.3% quarter-to-quarter).

Real annualized per-capita disposable income was reported to be $37,449 — up some $284 from the prior quarter (a 3.1% annualized growth rate) but still down $420 from the 4th quarter of 2012. A significant portion of that increased disposable income went into savings, with the savings rate growing to 5.3% — the highest savings level since 4Q-2012.

For this report the BEA effectively assumed annualized quarterly inflation of 2.00%. During the second quarter (i.e., from April through June) the growth rate of the seasonally adjusted CPI-U index published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) was over one and a half percent higher at a 3.53% (annualized) rate, and the price index reported by the Billion Prices Project (BPP — which arguably reflected the real experiences of American households) was three quarters of a percent higher at 2.72%. Under reported inflation will result in overly optimistic growth data, and if the BEA’s numbers were corrected for inflation using the BLS CPI-U the economy would be reported to be growing at a 2.49% annualized rate. If we were to use the BPP data to adjust for inflation, the first quarter’s growth rate would have been 3.30%.

Separately, the BEA released its annual revision to historical data (dating back to 1999). Average quarterly annualized growth in both 2011 and 2012 was reported to have been somewhat lower than previously reported (by about a third of a percent each year),…
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How Long to the Next Recession? iM’s Weekly Update

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Advisor Perspectives welcomes guest contributions. The views presented here do not necessarily represent those of Advisor Perspectives.


The BCI at 175.7 is down from last week’s downward revised 176.1. The BCIg, the smoothed annualized growth of BCI, at 19.0 is unchanged from last week’s downward revised level. These downward revisions are attributed to the Census Board revised figures for ‘New One Family Houses Sold’, which is one of the input data series to BCI. However, BCI does not indicate a possible recession in the near future.

Figure 1 plots BCIp, BCI, BCIg and the S&P500 together with the thresholds (red lines) that need to be crossed to be able to call a recession. Figure 2 plots the history of BCI, BCIg, and the LOG(S&P500) since July 1967, i.e. the last 44 years which include seven recessions, each which the BCI managed to indicate timely.


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The off-peak indicator BCIp is at 96.5, and at this level the BCIw graphic with the tracks to recession is not applicable.

The BCI, BCIp and BCIw are described in article 1, article 2 and article 3 respectively. Historic values of BCI, BCIg and BCIp can be downloaded from the author’s website.

Apart from the weekly Business Cycle Index, updates of a number of weekly and monthly financial macro models are also available on the website.


Anton Vrba and Georg Vrba
iM imarketsignals.com

Anton Vrba is an electrical engineer. He pursued a career in R&D, manufacturing and construction project management. He developed the iMarketSignals’ proprietary Business Cycle Index (BCI) and the authors’ website. His other interests are mathematics and physics. He is a lateral thinker and has many ideas that challenge the established and accepted explanations.

Georg Vrba is a professional engineer who has been a consulting engineer for many years. In his opinion, mathematical models provide better guidance to market direction than financial “experts.” He has developed financial models for the stock market, the bond market, yield curve, gold, silver and recession prediction, all published in Advisor Perspectives. The models are updated weekly at http://imarketsignals.com/.





A Tipping Point in Europe? Would It Impact the US?

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Advisor Perspectives welcomes guest contributions. The views presented here do not necessarily represent those of Advisor Perspectives.


Three popular stock indexes in Europe are giving multi-year rising support a heck of a test of late. Each index may have created a rising wedge, which two-thirds of the time suggests lower prices are ahead.

Argentina, with its potential default of debt, seems to be in the news this morning. In my humble opinion, what Europe does from here is VERY important!

IF … If Europe is reaching a “tipping point”, this price action very well could ripple into the S&P 500. Europe exhibited similar behavior in 2000 & 2007. Stay tuned!

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Kimble Charting Solutions
For information, send an email to services@kimblechartingsolutions.com.





New Jobless Claims Rebound from Last Week’s Low

Courtesy of Doug Short.

A big jump in new claims this week was partly the result of a 5K downward adjustment to last week’s claims. On a more positive note, the four-week moving average is the lowest since April 2006. Here is the opening statement from the Department of Labor:

In the week ending July 26, the advance figure for seasonally adjusted initial claims was 302,000, an increase of 23,000 from the previous week’s revised level. The previous week’s level was revised down by 5,000 from 284,000 to 279,000. The 4-week moving average was 297,250, a decrease of 3,500 from the previous week’s revised average. This is the lowest level for this average since April 15, 2006 when it was 296,000. The previous week’s average was revised down by 1,250 from 302,000 to 300,750.

There were no special factors impacting this week’s initial claims. [See full report]

Today’s seasonally adjusted number at 302K was close to the Investing.com forecast of 301K.

Here is a close look at the data over the past few years (with a callout for the past year), which gives a clearer sense of the overall trend in relation to the last recession and the volatility in recent months.

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As we can see, there’s a good bit of volatility in this indicator, which is why the 4-week moving average (the highlighted number) is a more useful number than the weekly data. Here is the complete data series.

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Occasionally I see articles critical of seasonal adjustment, especially when the non-adjusted number better suits the author’s bias. But a comparison of these two charts clearly shows extreme volatility of the non-adjusted data, and the 4-week MA gives an indication of the recurring pattern of seasonal change in the second chart (note, for example, those regular January spikes).

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Because of the extreme volatility of the non-adjusted weekly data, a 52-week moving average gives a better sense of the secular…
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Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

"Hello PSW Members –

This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743"

Thank you for you time!

 
 

Zero Hedge

The Coming Slump

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by Alasdair Macleod via The Cobden Centre blog,

Governments and central banks have made little or no progress in recovering from the Lehman crisis six years ago. The problem is not helped by dependence on statistics which are downright misleading. This is particularly true of real GDP, comprised of nominal GDP deflated by an estimate of price inflation. First, we must discuss the inflation adjustment.

The idea that there is such a thing as a valid measure of price inflation is only true in an econometrician’s imagination. An index which might be theoretically valid at a single point in time is only subsequently valid ...



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Chart School

3 Things Worth Thinking About (Volume 2)

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Advisor Perspectives welcomes guest contributions. The views presented here do not necessarily represent those of Advisor Perspectives.

Last week, I started a new weekly series entitled "3 Things Worth Thinking About". The focus here will be three things, ironically enough, that are worth considering with respect to your portfolio and related investments. As I have discussed many times previously, focusing only on "bullish" commentary when markets are rising is really of little use as it creates a "blind spot" to related investment risks. The same goes for when markets are falling. These cognitive biases get in the way of making logical and disciplined investment decisions to not only garner returns when markets rise, but avoid depletion of capital when they don't.

I hope you will...



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Phil's Favorites

Driverless Cars on UK Public Streets Starting January; Transforming Personal Mobility; Taxi and Truck-Drivers Targeted

Courtesy of Mish.

The march for fully autonomous driverless cars marches on. In May, Google announced the Next Phase in Driverless Cars: No Steering Wheel or Brake Pedals. Google’s prototype for its new cars will limit them to a top speed of 25 miles per hour. The cars are intended for driving in urban and suburban settings, not on highways. The low speed will probably keep the cars out of more restrictive regulatory categories for vehicles, giving them more design flexibility.

Google is having 100 cars built by a manufacturer in the Detroit area, which it declined to name. Nor would it say how much the prototype vehicles cost. They will have a range of about 100 miles, powered by an electric motor that is roughly equivalen...



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All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: David is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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Option Review

Kellogg Call Options Active Ahead Of Earnings

Shares in packaged foods producer Kellogg Co. (Ticker: K) are in positive territory on Monday afternoon, trading up by roughly 0.20% at $65.48 as of 2:20 p.m. ET. Options volume on the stock is well above average levels today, with around 12,500 contracts traded on the name versus an average daily reading of around 1,700 contracts. Most of the volume is concentrated in September expiry calls, perhaps ahead of the company’s second-quarter earnings report set for release ahead of the opening bell on Thursday. Time and sales data suggests traders are snapping up calls at the Sep 67.5, 70.0 and 72.5 strikes. Volume is heaviest in the Sep 72.5 strike calls, with around 4,600 contracts traded against sizable open interest of approximately 11,800 contracts. It looks like traders paid an average premium of $0.37 per contrac...



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Sabrient

Sector Detector: Bold bulls dare meek bears to take another crack

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Once again, stocks have shown some inkling of weakness. But every other time for almost three years running, the bears have failed to pile on and get a real correction in gear. Will this time be different? Bulls are almost daring them to try it, putting forth their best Dirty Harry impression: “Go ahead, make my day.” Despite weak or neutral charts and moderately bullish (at best) sector rankings, the trend is definitely on the side of the bulls, not to mention the bears’ neurotic skittishness about emerging into the sunlight.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, incl...



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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of July 28th, 2014

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Stock World Weekly

Stock World Weekly

Newsletter writers are available to chat with Members regarding topics presented in SWW in the comments below each post. 

Our weekly newsletter Stock World Weekly is ready for your enjoyment.

Read about the week ahead, trade ideas from Phil, and more. Please click here and sign in with your PSW user name and password. Or take a free trial.

We appreciate your feedback--please let us know what you think in the comment section below.  

...

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Digital Currencies

BitLicense Part 1 - Can Poorly Thought Out Regulation Drive the US Economy Back into the Dark Ages?

Courtesy of Reggie Middleton.

An Op-Ed piece penned by Veritaseum Chief Contracts Officer, Matt Bogosian

This past weekend (despite American Airlines' best efforts), Reggie and I made it to the Second Annual North American Bitcoin Conference in Chicago. While there were some very creative (and very ambitious) ideas on how to try to realize the disruptive Bitcoin protocol, one of the predominant topics of discussion was New York Superintendent of Financial Services Benjamin Lawsky's proposed Bitcoin regulations (the BitLicense proposal) - percieved by many participants at the event as an apparent ...



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Market Shadows

Danger: Falling Prices

Danger: Falling Prices

By Dr. Paul Price of Market Shadows

 

We tried holding up stock prices but couldn’t get the job done. Market Shadows’ Virtual Value Portfolio dipped by 2% during the week but still holds on to a market-beating 8.45% gain YTD. There was no escaping the downdraft after a major Portuguese bank failed. Of all the triggers for a large selloff, I’d guess the Portuguese bank failure was pretty far down most people's list of "things to worry about." 

All three major indices gave up some ground with the Nasdaq composite taking the hardest hi...



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Pharmboy

Biotechs & Bubbles

Reminder: Pharmboy is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Well PSW Subscribers....I am still here, barely.  From my last post a few months ago to now, nothing has changed much, but there are a few bargins out there that as investors, should be put on the watch list (again) and if so desired....buy a small amount.

First, the media is on a tear against biotechs/pharma, ripping companies for their drug prices.  Gilead's HepC drug, Sovaldi, is priced at $84K for the 12-week treatment.  Pundits were screaming bloody murder that it was a total rip off, but when one investigates the other drugs out there, and the consequences of not taking Sovaldi vs. another drug combinations, then things become clearer.  For instance, Olysio (JNJ) is about $66,000 for a 12-week treatment, but is approved for fewer types of patients AND...



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Promotions

See Live Demo Of This Google-Like Trade Algorithm

I just wanted to be sure you saw this.  There’s a ‘live’ training webinar this Thursday, March 27th at Noon or 9:00 pm ET.

If GOOGLE, the NSA, and Steve Jobs all got together in a room with the task of building a tremendously accurate trading algorithm… it wouldn’t just be any ordinary system… it’d be the greatest trading algorithm in the world.

Well, I hate to break it to you though… they never got around to building it, but my friends at Market Tamer did.

Follow this link to register for their training webinar where they’ll demonstrate the tested and proven Algorithm powered by the same technological principles that have made GOOGLE the #1 search engine on the planet!

And get this…had you done nothing b...



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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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