Author Archive for Chart School

Secular Trends in Employment: Goods Producing Versus Services Providing

Courtesy of Doug Short’s Advisor Perspectives.

Employment Ratio The Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics has monthly data on employment by industry categories reaching back to 1939. At the highest level, all jobs are divided into two categories: Service-Providing Industries and Goods Producing Industries. The adjacent chart illustrates the ratio of the two categories since 1939.

In 1939 service providing industries employed more people than goods producing, 62.9% to 37.1%, a ratio of 1.7-to-1. World War II triggered a surge in goods producing employment and an accompanying reduction in services. But following the war, we’ve seen a steady tilt toward services. The ratio is now 6.3 services jobs for every goods producing job. The key drivers of this secular trend have been the growth of automation that reduces the need for human labor and the globalization of goods production.

The next chart provides a more detailed view of these two employment cohorts. We’ve adjusted for the 380% growth in the employed population since 1939. A conspicuous feature of this snapshot is the sharp trend reversal in the early 1940s reflecting the impact of World War II on the demand for goods. Another notable detail is the stable ratio since the last recession. We saw shorter periods of a sustained ratio during the stagflation of the 1970s and for about three years starting at the end of 2003. The current ratio of services to goods producing has been essentially unchanged for over six years.

Another noteable insight is the consistent impact of recessions on the relative growth of the two cohorts: Even though the unemployment rate increases during recessions, the employed service providing population increases and goods producing jobs disappear. We also see that post-recession recoveries don’t reverse this pattern.

Employment Growth, Population Adjusted

The chart above is adjusted for population inflation based on growth the employed population. The next chart focuses on the services providing employed adjusted with a broader population base, the civilian labor force age 16 and over, which includes both the employed and those seeking employment. A striking feature of this chart is its uncanny resemblance to the S&P Composite (the S&P 500 spliced with its predecessor, the S&P 90).

Employment Growth, CLF16OV Adjusted

How close is the correlation with the S&P 500? Here is an overlay of the services-providing employed population (left axis) and the S&P 500 (log-scale right axis) since 1995.

Employment Growth, CLF16OV Adjusted

The index peaked in March 2000,…
continue reading





Weekly Unemployment Claims: Down 1K from Last Week, Better Than Forecast

Courtesy of Doug Short’s Advisor Perspectives.

Here is the opening statement from the Department of Labor:

In the week ending August 20, the advance figure for seasonally adjusted initial claims was 261,000, a decrease of 1,000 from the previous week’s unrevised level of 262,000. The 4-week moving average was 264,000, a decrease of 1,250 from the previous week’s unrevised average of 265,250.

There were no special factors impacting this week’s initial claims. This marks 77 consecutive weeks of initial claims below 300,000, the longest streak since 1970. [See full report]

Today’s seasonally adjusted 261K new claims, down 1K from last week’s number, was below the Investing.com forecast of 265K.

The four-week moving average is at 264,000, down from last week’s number.

Here is a close look at the data over the past few years (with a callout for the past year), which gives a clearer sense of the overall trend in relation to the last recession and the volatility in recent months.

Unemployment Claims since 2007

As we can see, there’s a good bit of volatility in this indicator, which is why the 4-week moving average (the highlighted number) is a more useful number than the weekly data. Here is the complete data series. This is the 77th consecutive week under 300K, the longest streak since 1970.

Unemployment Claims

The headline Unemployment Insurance data is seasonally adjusted. What does the non-seasonally adjusted data look like? See the chart below, which clearly shows extreme volatility of the non-adjusted data (the red dots). The 4-week MA gives an indication of the recurring pattern of seasonal change (note, for example, those regular January spikes).

Nonseasonally Adjusted Claims

Because of the extreme volatility of the non-adjusted weekly data, we can add a 52-week moving average to give a better sense of the secular trends. The chart below also has a linear regression through the data. We can see that this metric continues to fall below the long-term trend stretching back to 1968.

Nonseasonally Adjusted 52-week MA

Annual Comparisons

Here is a calendar-year overlay since 2009 using the 4-week moving average. The purpose is to compare the annual slopes since the peak in the spring of 2009.

Yearly Overlay

For an analysis of unemployment claims as a percent of the labor force, see our recent commentary What Do Weekly Unemployment Claims Tell
continue reading





Anticipating the August Employment Data: 177K New Nonfarm Private Jobs

Courtesy of Doug Short’s Advisor Perspectives.

The economic mover and shaker this week is Friday’s employment report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. This monthly report contains a wealth of data for economists, the most publicized being the month-over-month change in Total Nonfarm Employment (the PAYEMS series in the FRED repository). Today we have the August estimate of 177K new nonfarm private employment jobs from ADP, a decline from July’s 194K, which was a substantial upward revision from 19K. June was revised downward by 4K.

The 177K estimate came in slightly above the Investing.com forecast of 175 for the ADP number.

The Investing.com forecast for the forthcoming BLS report is for 180K nonfarm new jobs (the actual PAYEMS number).

Here is an excerpt from today’s ADP report:

“Job growth in August was stable and consistent with levels from previous months as consumer conditions improve,” said Ahu Yildirmaz, vice president and head of the ADP Research Institute. “Continued strong growth in service-providing jobs is offset by weakness in goods-producing areas.”

Mark Zandi, chief economist of Moody’s Analytics, said, “The American job machine continues to hum along. Job creation remains strong, with most industries and companies of all sizes adding solidly to their payrolls. The U.S. economy will soon be at full employment.”

Here is a visualization of the two series over the previous twelve months.

The key difference between the two series is that the BLS series is for Nonfarm Payrolls while ADP tracks private employment.


Here’s our list of monthly employment updates:

Employment Situation Report

Unemployment Claims

Civilian Labor Force, Unemployment Claims, and the Business Cycle

Labor Market Conditions Index

Long-Term Trends by Age Group

Aging Work Force

Ratio of Part Time and Full Time Employment

Multiple Jobholders

Workforce Recovery Since Recession





The Big Four Economic Indicators: Real Retail Sales Go Nowhere

Courtesy of Doug Short’s Advisor Perspectives.

Note: With the release of this morning’s Consumer Price Index, we’ve updated this commentary to include the Real Retail Sales data for July.


Official recession calls are the responsibility of the NBER Business Cycle Dating Committee, which is understandably vague about the specific indicators on which they base their decisions. This committee statement is about as close as they get to identifying their method.

There is, however, a general belief that there are four big indicators that the committee weighs heavily in their cycle identification process. They are:

  • Nonfarm Employment
  • Industrial Production
  • Real Retail Sales
  • Real Personal Income (excluding Transfer Receipts)

The Latest Indicator Data

Month-over-month nominal sales were flat in July (-0.04% to two decimals). Real Retail Sales, calculated with the seasonally adjusted Consumer Price Index, were also flat (0.003% to three decimals), an overall decline from the June real MoM 0.61% increase. The chart gives us a close look at the monthly data points in this series since the end of the last recession in mid-2009. The linear regression helps us identify variance from the trend.

The early 2014 dip in sales was generally written off as a temporary result severe winter, and the return to trend sales growth gave credence to the explanation. The early 2015 dip triggered the same explanation, but following the subsequent recovery, Real Sales have difted upward, but below trend.

The Generic Big Four

The chart and table below illustrate the performance of the generic Big Four with an overlay of a simple average of the four since the end of the Great Recession. The data points show the cumulative percent change from a zero starting point for June 2009.

Big Four Since the 2009 Trough

Current Assessment and Outlook

The US economy has been slow in recovering from the Great Recession, and the overall picture has been a mixed bag for well over a year and counting. Employment and Income have been relatively strong. Real Retail Sales have been weak at best over the past twelve months, and Industrial Production has essentially been in a recession, although optimists are hoping that the March low was a trough and IP may now be in recovery mode.

Here is a percent-off-high chart based on an average of the Big Four. The interim high was in November 2014 (fractionally below zero at three…
continue reading





The Big Four Economic Indicators: Industrial Production Rebounds Accelerates

Courtesy of Doug Short’s Advisor Perspectives.

Note: This commentary has been updated to incorporate the July data for Industrial Production.


Official recession calls are the responsibility of the NBER Business Cycle Dating Committee, which is understandably vague about the specific indicators on which they base their decisions. This committee statement is about as close as they get to identifying their method.

There is, however, a general belief that there are four big indicators that the committee weighs heavily in their cycle identification process. They are:

  • Nonfarm Employment
  • Industrial Production
  • Real Retail Sales
  • Real Personal Income (excluding Transfer Receipts)

The Latest Indicator Data

Today’s report on Industrial Production for July shows a month-over-month increase of 0.7 percent, which was significantly better than the Investing.com consensus of 0.3 percent. The previous month’s 0.6 increase was revised downward to a 0.4 percent decline. The July advance marks a further improvement from for in indicator that has contracted for 14 of the last 20 months, although on a quarterly basis, Industrial Production has contracted for the past three quarters.

Here is the overview from the Federal Reserve:

Industrial production rose 0.7 percent in July after moving up 0.4 percent in June. The advance in July was the largest for the index since November 2014. Manufacturing output increased 0.5 percent in July for its largest gain since July 2015. The index for utilities rose 2.1 percent as a result of warmer-than-usual weather in July boosting demand for air conditioning. The output of mining moved up 0.7 percent; the index has increased modestly, on net, over the past three months after having fallen about 17 percent between December 2014 and April 2016. At 104.9 percent of its 2012 average, total industrial production in July was 0.5 percent lower than its year-earlier level. Capacity utilization for the industrial sector increased 0.5 percentage point in July to 75.9 percent, a rate that is 4.1 percentage points below its long-run (1972–2015) average. [view full report]

The chart below shows the year-over-year percent change in Industrial Production since the series inception in 1919, the current level is lower than at the onset of 15 of the 17 recessions over this time fame of nearly a century.

Industrial Production Since 1919

Capacity Utilization

The Fed’s monthly Industrial Production estimate is accompanied by another closely watched indicator, Capacity Utilization, which…
continue reading





The Big Four Economic Indicators: Real Personal Income in July

Courtesy of Doug Short’s Advisor Perspectives.

Note: This commentary has been updated to include today’s release of the July data for Real Personal Income Less Transfer Receipts.


Official recession calls are the responsibility of the NBER Business Cycle Dating Committee, which is understandably vague about the specific indicators on which they base their decisions. This committee statement is about as close as they get to identifying their method.

There is, however, a general belief that there are four big indicators that the committee weighs heavily in their cycle identification process. They are:

  • Nonfarm Employment
  • Industrial Production
  • Real Retail Sales
  • Real Personal Income (excluding Transfer Receipts)

The Latest Indicator Data

Personal Income (excluding Transfer Receipts) in July rose 0.45% and is up 3.2% year-over-year. When we adjust for inflation using the BEA’s PCE Price Index, Real Personal Income (excluding Transfer Receipts) likewise rose 0.45%, since headline inflation as measured by the PCE Price Index was unchanged in July. The real number is up 2.4% year-over-year.

Real Personal Income

A Note on the Excluded Transfer Receipts: These are benefits received for no direct services performed. They include Social Security, Medicare & Medicaid, Unemployment Assistance, and a wide range other benefits, mostly from government, but a few from businesses. Here is an illustration Transfer Receipts as a percent of Personal Income.

The Generic Big Four

The chart and table below illustrate the performance of the generic Big Four with an overlay of a simple average of the four since the end of the Great Recession. The data points show the cumulative percent change from a zero starting point for June 2009.

Big Four Since the 2009 Trough

Current Assessment and Outlook

The US economy has been slow in recovering from the Great Recession, and the overall picture has been a mixed bag for well over a year and counting. Employment and Income have been relatively strong. Real Retail Sales have been weak at best over the past twelve months, and Industrial Production has essentially been in a recession, although optimists are hoping that the March low was a trough and IP may now be in recovery mode.

Here is a percent-off-high chart based on an average of the Big Four. The interim high was in November 2014 (fractionally below zero at three decimal places). The indicator primarily responsible for this decline is Industrial Production. Incidentally, the last time the average…
continue reading





Little Change

Courtesy of Declan.

I’m waiting for bears to step in and reverse the nascent breakout but it hasn’t happened yet. The intraday range was tight and the change relative to yesterday was small. This left little to add.




The S&P still has three ‘sell’ triggers in MACD, On-Balance-Volume and ADX to work off before the rally resumes.






The Nasdaq is creating a mini-bear flag, although confirmation will require a single day loss of at least 1%. It has a more solid technical picture than the S&P.





The Russell 2000 is on resistance, but it hasn’t yet negated the ‘bull trap’.  It too has a MACD trigger ‘sell’ to work off before buyers regain full control.





For tomorrow, look for the big swing to take markets out of their tight range.




You’ve now read my opinion, next read Douglas’ and Jani’s.




I trade a small account on eToro, and invest using Ameritrade. If you would like to join me on eToro, register through the banner link and search for “fallond”.




If you are new to spread betting, here is a guide on position size based on eToro’s system.









Moving Averages: Month-End Preview

Courtesy of Doug Short’s Advisor Perspectives.

Here is an advance preview of the monthly moving averages we track after the close of the last business day of the month. At this point, before the close on the last day of the month, all three S&P 500 strategies are signaling “invested” — unchanged from last month’s triple “invested” signal. All five Ivy Portfolio ETFs — Vanguard Total Stock Market ETF (VTI), iShares’ Barclays 7-10 Year Treasury (IEF), PowerShares DB (DBC), Vanguard FTSE All-World ex-US ETF (VEU) and Vanguard REIT Index ETF (VNQ) — are signaling “invested”, changed from last month’s quadruple invested signal.

Month-End Preview

If a position is less than 2% from a signal, it is highlighted in yellow.

Note: Our inclusion of the S&P 500 index updates is intended to illustrate a popular moving moving-average timing strategy. The index signals also give a general sense of how US equities are behaving. However, for followers of a moving average strategy, the general practice is to make buy/sell decisions on the signals for each specific investment, not based on a broad index. Even if you’re investing in a fund that tracks the S&P 500 (e.g., Vanguard’s VFINX or the SPY ETF) the moving average signals for the funds will occasionally differ from the underlying index because of dividend reinvestment, which is not factored into the index closes.

The Ivy Portfolio

The second of the three adjacent tables previews the 10-month SMA timing signals for the five asset classes highlighted in The Ivy Portfolio.

We’ve also included (third table) the 12-month SMA timing signals for the Ivy ETFs in response to the many requests to include this slightly longer timeframe.


After the end-of-month market close, we’ll update the monthly moving average feature with charts to illustrate.

The bottom line is that these moving-average signals have a good track record for long-term gains while avoiding major losses. They’re not fool-proof, but they essentially dodged the 2007-2009 bear and have captured significant gains since the initial buy signals after the March 2009 low.





S&P 500 Snapshot: A Modest Loss as Jobs Friday Begins Moving into Focus

Courtesy of Doug Short’s Advisor Perspectives.

A preliminary read on Consumer Confidence surprised to the upside, but shortly after 10 AM release of that news, the S&P 500 moved lower in the first of two bouts of selling in today’s session. After trimming a bit of the morning loss, a second wave down after the lunch hour sent the index to its -0.46% intraday low. A bit of buy-the-dip mentality took hold and lifted the index to its modest 0.20% close. The big news this week, as the market pundits are quick to point out, is Friday’s employment report. Will the market see a good jobs report as bad news? An omen of a less accommodative Fed?

The yield on the 10-year note closed at at 1.57%, unchanged from the previous close.

Here is a snapshot of past five sessions in the S&P 500.

S&P 500

Here is daily chart of the index. Volume increased slightly above Monday’s 2016 low but remains in late summer doldrums.

S&P 500

A Perspective on Drawdowns

Here’s a snapshot of selloffs since the 2009 trough.

S&P 500 Drawdowns

Here is a more conventional log-scale chart with drawdowns highlighted.

S&P 500 MAs

Here is a linear scale version of the same chart with the 50- and 200-day moving averages.

S&P 500 MAs

A Perspective on Volatility

For a sense of the correlation between the closing price and intraday volatility, the chart below overlays the S&P 500 since 2007 with the intraday price range. We’ve also included a 20-day moving average to help identify trends in volatility.

S&P 500 Snapshot





Consumer Confidence at 11-Month High

Courtesy of Doug Short’s Advisor Perspectives.

The latest Conference Board Consumer Confidence Index was released this morning based on data collected through August 18. The headline number of 101.1 was a solid increase from the final reading of 96.7 for July, a downward revision from 97.3. Today’s number was substantially above the Investing.com consensus of 97.0. This is the highest reading of the past 11 months.

Here is an excerpt from the Conference Board press release.

“Consumer confidence improved in August to its highest level in nearly a year, after a marginal decline in July,” said Lynn Franco, Director of Economic Indicators at The Conference Board. “Consumers’ assessment of both current business and labor market conditions was considerably more favorable than last month. Short-term expectations regarding business and employment conditions, as well as personal income prospects, also improved, suggesting the possibility of a moderate pick-up in growth in the coming months.”

Putting the Latest Number in Context

The chart below is another attempt to evaluate the historical context for this index as a coincident indicator of the economy. Toward this end we have highlighted recessions and included GDP. The regression through the index data shows the long-term trend and highlights the extreme volatility of this indicator. Statisticians may assign little significance to a regression through this sort of data. But the slope resembles the regression trend for real GDP shown below, and it is a more revealing gauge of relative confidence than the 1985 level of 100 that the Conference Board cites as a point of reference.

Consumer Confidence

On a percentile basis, the latest reading is at the 63rd percentile of all the monthly data points since June 1977, up from the 53rd percentile the previous month.

For an additional perspective on consumer attitudes, see the most recent Reuters/University of Michigan Consumer Sentiment Index. Here is the chart from that post.

Consumer Sentiment

And finally, let’s take a look at the correlation between consumer confidence and small business sentiment, the latter by way of the National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) Small Business Optimism Index. As the chart illustrates, the two have tracked one another fairly closely since the onset of the Financial Crisis, although a bit of spread has appeared in the second half of 2015 and start of 2016.

NFIB Optimism and Consumer Confidence





 
 
 

ValueWalk

Francis Chou: Valeant, NIRP And a test to see if you're a value investor

By VW Staff. Originally published at ValueWalk.

Francis Chou‘s Chou Associates Fund letter for the first half ended June 30, 2016.

]]> Get The Timeless Reading eBook in PDF

Get the entire 10-part series on Timeless Reading in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your tablet, or email to your colleagues.

Dear Unitholders of Chou Associates Fund,

The net asset value ("NAVPU" or "NAV") of a Series A unit of Chou Associates Fund at June 30, 2016 was $92.66 compared to $115.50 at December 31, 2015, a d...



more from ValueWalk

Chart School

Secular Trends in Employment: Goods Producing Versus Services Providing

Courtesy of Doug Short's Advisor Perspectives.

The Department of Labor's Bureau of Labor Statistics has monthly data on employment by industry categories reaching back to 1939. At the highest level, all jobs are divided into two categories: Service-Providing Industries and Goods Producing Industries. The adjacent chart illustrates the ratio of the two categories since 1939.

In 1939 service providing industries employed more people than goods producing, 62.9% to 37.1%, a ratio of 1.7-to-1. World War II triggered a surge in goods producing employment and an accompanying reduction in services. But following the war, we've seen a steady tilt toward services. The ratio is now 6.3 services jobs for every goods producing job. The key drivers of this secular trend ...



more from Chart School

Zero Hedge

South Africa's Largest Debt Manager Halts Loans To State Firms, Rand Tumbles

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

In a shocking move, South Africa's largest fixed income manager has halted all lending to state-owened entities on governance concerns.

  • *FUTUREGROWTH SAYS IT CAN'T PLACE CLIENT MONEY AT RISK

As Bloomberg details,

Africa’s biggest private fixed-income money manager will stop lending money to six of South Africa’s largest state companies because it’s concerned about how they are being run, government infighting and threats to the independence of the finance ministry.

Futuregrowth Asset...



more from Tyler

Market News

News You Can Use From Phil's Stock World

 

Financial Markets and Economy

Apple Must Pay Billions for Tax Breaks in Ireland, E.U. Orders (NY Times)

The European Union on Tuesday ordered Ireland to collect $14.5 billion in unpaid taxes from Apple, a record penalty that worsened tensions with the United States over the bloc’s crackdown on sweetheart deals with global multinationals.

Dol...



more from Paul

Phil's Favorites

Do You Believe There is Food Price Deflation? Mish vs. Consensus

Courtesy of Mish.

Here’s the question of the day: Do you believe there is food price deflation?

The reason I ask is the Wall Street Journal reports Food Price Deflation Cheers Consumers, Hurts Farmers, Grocers and Restaurants.

The U.S. is on track this year to post the longest stretch of falling food prices in more than 50 years, a streak that is cheering shoppers at the checkout line but putting a financial strain on farmers and grocery stores.

The trend is being fueled by an excess supply of dairy products, meat, grains and other staples and less demand for many of those same products from China and elsewhere due to the strong dollar. Lower energy costs...



more from Ilene

Kimble Charting Solutions

US Dollar/Yen testing important support zone

Courtesy of Chris Kimble.

The US Dollar/Yen is facing a trio of potential support lines at this time with few people bullish the US$/Yen at Stocktwits. What happens at this potential support zone, could well impact the Risk On trade from now until year end.

CLICK ON CHART TO ENLARGE

The trend in the US$/Yen remains down for the past few months, as the YEN has been stronger than the US$. The US$/YEN remains inside of a steep falling channel over the past 10-months.

The bottom of this steep falling channel and two ot...



more from Kimble C.S.

OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio -week of August 29th, 2016

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



more from OpTrader

Biotech

Epizyme - A Waiting Game

Reminder: Pharmboy is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Epizyme was founded in 2007, and trying to create drugs to treat patient's cancer by focusing on genetically-linked differences between normal and cancer cells. Cancer areas of focus include leukemia, Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and breast cancer.  One of the Epizme cofounders, H. Robert Horvitz, won the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 2002 for "discoveries concerning genetic regulation of organ development and programmed cell death."

Before discussing the drug targets of Epizyme, understanding epigenetics is crucial to comprehend the company's goals.  

Genetic components are the DNA sequences that are 'inherited.'  Some of these genes are stronger than others in their expression (e.g., eye color).  Yet, some genes turn on or off due to external factors (environmental), and it is und...



more from Biotech

Digital Currencies

Man Who Introduced Millions to Bitcoin Says Blockchain Is a Bust

 

Man Who Introduced Millions to Bitcoin Says Blockchain Is a Bust 

By  at Bloomberg

Excerpt:

Stefan Thomas, who introduced millions of people to bitcoin, has had a change of heart.

Blockchain, the ledger software that makes the digital currency possible...



more from Bitcoin

Mapping The Market

Illusion of Choice

From Jean-Luc:

Looks like we are down to about 10 companies for our consumer goods:

http://www.visualcapitalist.com/illusion-of-choice-consumer-brands/

Just like banks, airlines and cable companies! 

The Illusion of Choice in Consumer Brands

Explore the full-size version of the above graphic in all its glory.

If today’s infographic looks familiar, that’s because it originates from a well-circulated report that Oxfam International puts together to show consolidation i...



more from M.T.M.

All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: Harlan is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

more from David

Promotions

PSW is more than just stock talk!

 

We know you love coming here for our Stocks & Options education, strategy and trade ideas, and for Phil's daily commentary which you can't live without, but there's more!

PhilStockWorld.com features the most important and most interesting news items from around the web, all day, every day!

News: If you missed it, you can probably find it in our Market News section. We sift through piles of news so you don't have to.   

If you are looking for non-mainstream, provocatively-narrated news and opinion pieces which promise to make you think -- we feature Zero Hedge, ...



more from Promotions

Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

"Hello PSW Members –

This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743

Thank you for you time!




FeedTheBull - Top Stock market and Finance Sites



About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

Learn more About Phil >>


As Seen On:




About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

Market Shadows >>