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S&P 500 Snapshot: A Small Gain After Some Typical Gaming of the FOMC Statement

Courtesy of Doug Short.

The S&P 500, not surprisingly, remained subdued in advance of the 2 PM Fed action, which included the FOMC statement and a separately released set of economic projections (PDF format). The trader gaming began about 15 minutes before the statement was released and continued through Chair Yellen’s 2:30 PM press conference. After the Fed inspired volatility, the index closed with a small gain of 0.13%.

The yield on the 10-year Note closed at 2.62%, up 2 bps from yesterday’s close. It is now 28 bps above its 2014 low.

Here is a 5-minute chart of that illustrates today’s fast trade gamesmanship.

Check out today’s volume in the SPY ETF.

For a longer-term perspective, here is a pair of charts based on daily closes starting with the all-time high prior to the Great Recession.

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Economic Denial From Builders: The Sequel

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Advisor Perspectives welcomes guest contributions. The views presented here do not necessarily represent those of Advisor Perspectives.


On this date last year I shared a chart with CNBC’s Diana Olick, which indicated how far removed home builders were from economic reality. Titled appropriately “Economic Denial From Home Builders”. The chart and article can be read here:

http://loganmohtashami.com/2013/09/17/economic-denial-from-home-builders/

Now, one year later, the builders have raised confidence to yet a higher and ever more disconnected from reality level, by reporting confidence levels equal to the number recorded back in November of 2005. At that time, numbers of total starts were quite high compared to today’s numbers. Also, it is notable that November 2005 was in the middle of the housing bubble that being formed.

Below a chart, from Diana Olick on CNBC, illustrates the current disconnect. As can be seen, we are witnessing the summer sequel of economic denial by home builders.

An irony to this is that 2014 has been the most disappointing year from new home sales and starts that I can remember since I began tracking housing data. A year when 1) sales growth was expected to rise 20% or more and 2) starts were expected to show growth in single family starts is puttering to a point that we are now questioning if sales and single family starts are even going to be positive year over year. As for starts, those are led by multifamily expansion, which has been booming in this cycle for good reasons, but not reasons which bode well for single family housing.

One reason for these trends, I believe, is that new home buyers are more interested in the fresh existing inventory crop that is coming back to the market than in buying a new home. Why would this be?

Existing inventory provides two advantages to a buyer:

  1. Much cheaper
  2. Geographical advantage in any given city

At the beginning of the year, my conservative outlook was for 8% sales growth year over year due to the “low bar we had to beat” factor and the fact that the new home buyers are coming from more affluent class of Americans. But now, even 8% is looking doubtful.

As always housing is soft because we have both a DTI ( Debt to Income) and LTI (Liability to Income) problem. Here’s another great…
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Daily Market Commentary: Semiconductors Advance

Courtesy of Declan.

It was a roller coaster day, but the Semiconductor Index was the one to finish with an edge to the bulls. It looks like a break of 652 will happen sooner rather than later, with the swing low at 631 a handy place to mark risk (for a stop).


For the Nasdaq 100, yesterday marked a positive test of convergence between the channel and 3,998. A breakout in the Semiconductor Index will help the Nasdaq 100 get to the top of the channel.

The Russell 2000 finished near the day’s low. However, it remains above the 200-day and 50-day MAs. While the index is caught inside a broader range, the narrower channel is offering some (weak) upside potential.

 The Nasdaq is holding to the ‘bear trap’. By week’s end, a challenge of 4,610 would not be unlikely.

While today was marked by indecision and wide range days, there is reasonable expectation to expect additional gains. Technicals are weakening, but there should be enough from yesterday’s swing low to generate interest for bulls.

Accepting KIVA gift certificates to help support the work on this blog. All certificates gifted are converted into loans for those who need the help more.





A Long-Term Look at Inflation

Courtesy of Doug Short.

The August Consumer Price Index for Urban Consumers (CPI-U) released this morning puts the August year-over-year inflation rate at 1.70%, off the May 19-month high of 2.13%. It is well below the 3.87% average since the end of the Second World War and 28 percent below its 10-year moving average.

For a comparison of headline inflation with core inflation, which is based on the CPI excluding food and energy, see this monthly feature.

For better understanding of how CPI is measured and how it impacts your household, see my Inside Look at CPI components.

For an even closer look at how the components are behaving, see this X-Ray View of the data for the past six months.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) has compiled CPI data since 1913, and numbers are conveniently available from the FRED repository (here). My long-term inflation charts reach back to 1872 by adding Warren and Pearson’s price index for the earlier years. The spliced series is available at Yale Professor (and Nobel laureate) Robert Shiller’s website. This look further back into the past dramatically illustrates the extreme oscillation between inflation and deflation during the first 70 years of our timeline. Click here for additional perspectives on inflation and the shrinking value of the dollar.

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Alternate Inflation Data

The chart below (click here for a larger version) includes an alternate look at inflation *without* the calculation modifications the 1980s and 1990s (Data from www.shadowstats.com).

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On a personal note, I believe the current BLS method of calculating inflation is reasonably sound. As a first-wave Boomer who raised a family during the double-digit inflation years of the 1970s and early 1980s, I see nothing today that is remotely like the inflation we endured at that time. Moreover, government policy, the Federal Funds Rate, interest rates in general and decades of major business decisions have been fundamentally driven by the official BLS inflation data, not the alternate CPI. For this reason I view the alternate inflation data as an interesting but ultimately useless statistical series.

That said, I…
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Inflation: A Six-Month X-Ray View

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Here is a table showing the annualized change in Headline and Core CPI, not seasonally adjusted, for each of the past six months. I’ve also included each of the eight components of Headline CPI and a separate entry for Energy, which is a collection of sub-indexes in Housing and Transportation.

We can make some inferences about how inflation is impacting our personal expenses depending on our relative exposure to the individual components. Some of us have higher transportation costs, others medical costs, etc.

A conspicuous feature in the table through the latest data is the volatility of energy, essentially the fluctuation in gasoline prices, which is also reflected in Transportation.

Here is the same table with month-over-month numbers (not seasonally adjusted). The change in energy costs is clearly illustrated, reflected here too in transportation.

The Trends in Headline and Core CPI

The chart below shows Headline and Core CPI for urban consumers since 2007. Core CPI excludes the two most volatile components, food and energy. I’ve highlighted the 2% to 2.5% range that the FOMC targeted in their December 12, 2012 press release, although the Fed has traditionally used the Personal Consumption Expenditure (PCE) price index as their preferred inflation gauge.

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Year-over-year Core CPI (the blue line) made a moderate arc above the 2% benchmark beginning October of 2011. It dropped below the 2% – 2.5% range in August of 2012, but grazed the bottom of that range in February and July of last year. Core CPI has been below 2% for 24 of the last 28 months. The more volatile Headline CPI has spent 25 of the past of the past 28 months under the 2% lower benchmark. Much of the volatility in the past few years has been the result of broad swings in gasoline prices (more on gasoline here).

For a longer-term perspective, here is a column-style breakdown of the inflation categories showing the change since 2000.

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Note: For additional information on the component composition of the Consumer Price Index, see my Inside the Consumer Price Index.





What Inflation Means to You: Inside the Consumer Price Index

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Note from dshort : The charts in this commentary have been updated to include today’s Consumer Price Index news release for the August data.

The Fed justified a previous round of quantitative easing “to promote a stronger pace of economic recovery and to help ensure that inflation, over time, is at levels consistent with its mandate” (full text). In effect, the Fed has been trying to increase inflation, operating at the macro level. But what does an increase in inflation mean at the micro level — specifically to your household?

Let’s do some analysis of the Consumer Price Index, the best known measure of inflation. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) divides all expenditures into eight categories and assigns a relative size to each. The pie chart below illustrates the components of the Consumer Price Index for Urban Consumers, the CPI-U, which I’ll refer to hereafter as the CPI.

The slices are listed in the order used by the BLS in their tables, not the relative size. The first three follow the traditional order of urgency: food, shelter, and clothing. Transportation comes before Medical Care, and Recreation precedes the lumped category of Education and Communication. Other Goods and Services refers to a bizarre grab-bag of odd fellows, including tobacco, cosmetics, financial services, and funeral expenses. For a complete breakdown and relative weights of all the subcategories of the eight categories, here is a useful link.

The chart below shows the cumulative percent change in price for each of the eight categories since 2000.

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Not surprisingly, Medical Care has been the fastest growing category. At the opposite end, Apparel has actually been deflating since 2000. Another unique feature of Apparel is the obvious seasonal volatility of the contour.

Transportation is the other category with high volatility — much more dramatic and irregular than the seasonality of Apparel. Transportation includes a wide range of subcategories. The volatility is largely driven by the Motor Fuel subcategory. For a closer look at gasoline, see this chart in my weekly gasoline update.

The Ominous Shadow Category of Energy

The BLS does not lump energy costs into an expenditure category. Instead, it includes energy subcategories in Housing in addition to the fuel…
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Median Household Incomes by Age Bracket: 1967-2013

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Earlier today I updated my commentary on household income distribution to include the Census Bureau’s release of the 2013 annual data. My focus was on arithmetic mean (average) household incomes by quintile (and the top 5%) over the 46-year history of this data series. The analysis offered some fascinating insights into U.S. household incomes.

But the classification misses the implications of age for income. Households are by no means locked into the same quintile over time. Young educated households with professional skills and aspirations will typically move into the higher earning brackets during their financial life cycles. Households dependent on income from unskilled labor and service employment will not see the same financial progress over the years.

So let’s review the household income data another way, this time focusing on the incomes by the age bracket. The data I’m analyzing is the median household income the age brackets for the heads of household (see Table H.10).

Because this is a longitudinal analysis across nearly four decades, including the stagflation of the 1970s, I’ve used the Census Bureau’s real (inflation-adjusted) series chained in 2013 dollars based on a research variant of the Consumer Price Index, the CPI-U-RS. In other words, the incomes in earlier years have been adjusted upward to the purchasing power of the most recent year in the series.

The first chart shows real household incomes of the six age brackets from 1967 through 2013.

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But more revealing is a comparison of the cumulative real growth of median incomes for the six age brackets.

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Let’s focus on the plight of the peak earning age bracket, ages 45-54.

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There are some immediate observations we can make about these charts:

  • In the first chart we see clearly that the 45-54 age bracket lays claim to the peak earning years for U.S. households.
  • In the second chart we see that the two older age brackets have cumulative growth superior to the peak earnings bracket. In fact, the 65 and older


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U.S. Household Incomes: A 46-Year Perspective

Courtesy of Doug Short.

The Census Bureau has now released its annual report household income data for 2013. It is posted on the Census Bureau website. What I’m featuring in this update is an analysis of the quintile breakdown of data from 1967 through 2013 (see Table H.3).

Most people think in nominal terms, so the first chart below illustrates the current dollar values across the 46-year period (in other words, the value of a dollar at the time received — not adjusted for inflation). What we see are the nominal quintile growth patterns over the complete data series. In addition to the quintiles, the Census Bureau publishes the income for the top five percent of households.

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The next chart adjusts for inflation in chained 2013 dollars based on a research variant of the Consumer Price Index, the CPI-U-RS. In other words, the incomes in earlier years have been adjusted upward to the purchasing power of the most recent year in the series.

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As for the cumulative household income growth by segment over the past 46 years, the adjacent table shows the real, inflation-adjusted, difference between 1967 and 2013.

To give us a better idea of the underlying trends in household incomes, I’ve also prepared charts of the nominal and real percentage growth since 1967. Here is the real version with some annotations. Note in particular the growing spread between the top quintile (and especially the top 5%) and the other four quintiles.

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Here is a table showing decline in income for each household segment from its real peak.

This table clearly illustrates a key explanation for the prolonged weakness in the consumer and small business confidence indicators I track:

For example, here is the Michigan Consumer Sentiment Index:

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It’s important to understand that the data in the charts above is for the mean (average) income for each of these segments. For US households quintiles, the mean (average) income is higher than the median (middle of the range). I’ll have more to say about this negative skew in a follow-up article on household incomes by age bracket.





Inflation? Not in August, Thanks to the Drop in Gasoline Prices

Courtesy of Doug Short.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics released the August CPI data this morning. Year-over-year unadjusted Headline CPI came in at 1.70%, down from the previous month’ 1.99%. Year-over-year Core CPI (ex Food and Energy) came in at 1.72% (rounded to 1.7%), down from the previous month’s 1.86%. The non-seasonally adjusted month-over-month Headline number was negative at -0.17%, and the Core number was up a fractional 0.07%. On a seasonally-adjusted basis, the all items index posted its first contraction in 16 months. The decline in energy prices, most notably gasoline, was the key factor in the disinflationary August numbers. For more on that topic, see my latest weekly gasoline update.

Here is the introduction from the BLS summary, which leads with the seasonally adjusted data monthly data:

The Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) decreased 0.2 percent in August on a seasonally adjusted basis, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Over the last 12 months, the all items index increased 1.7 percent before seasonal adjustment.

The seasonally adjusted decline in the all items index was the first since April 2013. The indexes for food and shelter rose, but the increases were more than offset by declines in energy indexes, especially gasoline. The energy index fell 2.6 percent, with the gasoline index declining 4.1 percent and the indexes for natural gas and fuel oil also decreasing.

The index for all items less food and energy was unchanged in August; this was the first month since October 2010 that the index did not increase. While the shelter index increased and the indexes for new vehicles and for alcoholic beverages also rose, these advances were offset by declines in several indexes, including airline fares, recreation, household furnishings and operations, apparel, and used cars and trucks.

The all items index increased 1.7 percent over the last 12 months, a decline from the 2.0 percent figure for the 12 months ending July, and the smallest 12-month change since March. The index for all items less food and energy also rose 1.7 percent over the last 12 months. The food index has risen 2.7 percent over the span, while the energy index has increased 0.4 percent.   [More…]

Investing.com was looking for increases of 0.1% for Headline and 0.2% for Core…
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Median Household Income Growth: Deflating the American Dream

Courtesy of Doug Short.

What is the single best indicator of the American Dream? Many would point to household income growth. The Census Bureau has now published some selected annual household income data in a new report: Income and Poverty in the United States: 2013. Last year the median (middle) household income was $51,939 — a tiny increase of 0.3% 2012. Let’s put the new release into a larger historical context.

My study of the Census Bureau’s historical data shows a 627% growth in median household incomes from 1967 through 2013. The ride has been bumpy, but it equates to a 4.41% annualized growth rate. Sounds impressive, but if you adjust for inflation using the Census Bureau’s method, that nominal 627% total growth shrinks to about 22%, a “real” annualized growth rate of 0.46%.

But if we dig a bit deeper into the method of inflation adjustment, the American Dream looks more like an illusion, as in “money illusion“.

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My primary focus on 21st Century monthly median household income was based on the excellent monthly data available from Sentier Research. See Median Household Incomes: Monthly Update. The Sentier Research findings are based on Census Bureau (CB) data and adjusted for inflation using the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Consumer Price Index for Urban Consumers (CPI-U), which most people, including the BLS, commonly abbreviate as the “CPI”. However, the CB’s own annual data series for household income, which reaches back to 1967, uses a different index to “deflate” the nominal income data. The CB researchers adjust using the little-known CPI-U-RS (RS stands for “research series”) as the deflator for their annual data.

The BLS website has slender information about this index. A site search turns up this page, which contains a link to a PDF file with the index from 1977 through 2013.

However, the CB has a version of the annual CPI-U-RS back to 1967, the starting year for their household income. I have not found the pre-1978 annual CPI-U-RS data at either the CB or BLS website. However, some excellent academic work at the Oregon State University Political Science website has reconstructed the annual index data. I’ve used their CPI-U-RS conversion metrics in the illustrations below.…
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Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

"Hello PSW Members –

This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743

Thank you for you time!

 
 

Phil's Favorites

Be Humble, Become Wealthy

Be Humble, Become Wealthy

Courtesy of Tim Richards of The Psy-Fi Blog

Thrusting, Decisive and Frequently Wrong

We are both by design and by culture inclined to be anything but humble in our approach to investing. We usually invest on the basis that we're certain that we've picked winners, we sell in the certainty that we can re-invest our capital to make more money elsewhere. We are usually wrong, often extremely wrong.

These tendencies come partially from hard-wired biases and partly from emotional responses to the situations we perceive ourselves to be in. But they also arise out of cultural requirements to show ourselves to be decisive and thrusting; we rarely reward those who show caution in the face of uncer...



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Chart School

S&P 500 Snapshot: A Small Gain After Some Typical Gaming of the FOMC Statement

Courtesy of Doug Short.

The S&P 500, not surprisingly, remained subdued in advance of the 2 PM Fed action, which included the FOMC statement and a separately released set of economic projections (PDF format). The trader gaming began about 15 minutes before the statement was released and continued through Chair Yellen's 2:30 PM press conference. After the Fed inspired volatility, the index closed with a small gain of 0.13%.

The yield on the 10-year Note closed at 2.62%, up 2 bps from yesterday's close. It is now 28 bps above its 2014 low.

Here is a 5-minute chart of that illustrates today's fast trade gamesmanship.

Check out t...



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Zero Hedge

Goldman's Yellen Press Conference Post-Mortem: "Few Surprises"

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Via Goldman Sachs' Jan Hatzius,

BOTTOM LINE: There were few surprises from Fed Chair Yellen's post-FOMC press conference.

MAIN POINTS:

1. Yellen made two slightly dovish remarks on labor market developments. First, she stated directly that she felt the slow increase in wages was indicative of labor market slack. Second, she said that her own personal view was that there was a "meaningful" cyclical shortfall in participation, when asked about a recent paper by some Fed authors indicating otherwise.

2. On the topic of "considerable time," Yellen declined to provide any specificity on what the phrase means ...



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All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: David is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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Insider Scoop

United Parcel Service, Inc. Shares Follow FedEx Corporation Shares Higher On FedEx Earnings Beat

Courtesy of Benzinga.

Related FDX Stocks Hitting 52-Week Highs Morning Market Movers Buyback Mania Inflates 2Q Earnings Growth (Fox Business)

Before the opening bell today, FedEx Corporation (NYSE: FDX) reported better-than-expected revenue ($11.7 billion vs. $11.47 billion) and EPS ($2.10 vs. $1.94...



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Promotions

See Live Demo Of This Google-Like Trade Algorithm

If GOOGLE, the NSA, and Bill Gates all got together in a room with the task of building the most accurate trading algorithm… it wouldn’t just be any ordinary system… it’d be the greatest trading algorithm in the world.

Well, I hate to break it to you… they never got around to building it, but my colleagues at Market Tamer did.

Follow this link to register for their training webinar where they’ll demonstrate the tested and proven Algorithm powered by the same technological principles that have made GOOGLE the #1 search engine on the planet!

And get this…had you done nothing but traded a handful of conservative alerts since its inception, you would have experienced portfolio gains exceeding 200%!

Plus, when you register for the webinar you’ll g...



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Sabrient

Sector Detector: Bulls go down swinging, refusing to give up much ground

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Although the stock market displayed weakness last week as I suggested it would, bulls aren’t going down easily. In fact, they’re going down swinging, absorbing most of the blows delivered by hesitant bears. Despite holding up admirably when weakness was both expected and warranted, and although I still see higher highs ahead, I am still not convinced that we have seen the ultimate lows for this pullback. A number of signs point to more weakness ahead.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, including a sector rotation strategy using ETFs and an enhanced version using top-r...



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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of September 15th, 2014

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Stock World Weekly

Stock World Weekly

Newsletter writers are available to chat with Members regarding topics presented in SWW, comments are found below each post.

Here's the latest Stock World Weekly. Enjoy!

[Sign in with your PSW user name and password, or take a free trial here.]

Image courtesy of Business Insider, Jay Yarow's This Is The Best Description Of How Apple's Business Works Right Now.

 

...

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Option Review

Big Prints In VIX Calls

The CBOE Vix Index is in positive territory on Friday morning as shares in the S&P 500 Index move slightly lower. Currently the VIX is up roughly 2.75% on the session at 13.16 as of 11:35 am ET. Earlier in the session big prints in October expiry call options caught our attention as one large options market participants appears to have purchased roughly 106,000 of the Oct 22.0 strike calls for a premium of around $0.45 each. The VIX has not topped 22.0 since the end of 2012, but it would not take such a dramatic move in the spot index in order to lift premium on the contracts. The far out-of-the-money calls would likely increase in value in the event that S&P500 Index stocks slip in the near term. The VIX traded up to a 52-week high of 21.48 back in February. Next week’s release of the FOMC meeting minutes f...



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Digital Currencies

Making Sense of Bitcoin

Making Sense of Bitcoin

By James Black at International Man

Despite the various opinions on Bitcoin, there is no question as to its ultimate value: its ability to bypass government restrictions, including economic embargoes and capital controls, to transmit quasi-anonymous money to anyone anywhere.

Opinions differ as to what constitutes "money."

The English word "money" derives from the Latin word "moneta," which means to "mint." Historically, "money" was minted in the form of precious metals, most notably gold and silver. Minted metal was considered "money" because it possessed luster, was scarce, and had perceive...



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Market Shadows

Helen Davis Chaitman Reviews In Bed with Wall Street.

Author Helen Davis Chaitman is a nationally recognized litigator with a diverse trial practice in the areas of lender liability, bankruptcy, bank fraud, RICO, professional malpractice, trusts and estates, and white collar defense. In 1995, Ms. Chaitman was named one of the nation's top ten litigators by the National Law Journal for a jury verdict she obtained in an accountants' malpractice case. Ms. Chaitman is the author of The Law of Lender Liability (Warren, Gorham & Lamont 1990)... Since early 2009, Ms. Chaitman has been an outspoken advocate for investors in Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities LLC (more here).

Helen Davis Chaitman Reviews In Bed with Wall Street. 

By Helen Davis Chaitman   

I confess: Larry D...



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Pharmboy

Biotechs & Bubbles

Reminder: Pharmboy is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Well PSW Subscribers....I am still here, barely.  From my last post a few months ago to now, nothing has changed much, but there are a few bargins out there that as investors, should be put on the watch list (again) and if so desired....buy a small amount.

First, the media is on a tear against biotechs/pharma, ripping companies for their drug prices.  Gilead's HepC drug, Sovaldi, is priced at $84K for the 12-week treatment.  Pundits were screaming bloody murder that it was a total rip off, but when one investigates the other drugs out there, and the consequences of not taking Sovaldi vs. another drug combinations, then things become clearer.  For instance, Olysio (JNJ) is about $66,000 for a 12-week treatment, but is approved for fewer types of patients AND...



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FeedTheBull - Top Stock market and Finance Sites



About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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