Author Archive for ilene

The US Economy Is Not Awesome And It’s Not Decoupled

Courtesy of David Stockman at Contra Corner

When the bubble vision stock peddlers get desperate, they talk decoupling. So by the end of yesterday’s bloodbath you would have thought China was on another planet, and that “commodities” were some trinket-like collectibles gathered by people who don’t wear long pants, drink coca cola or jabber on their cell phones.

On these fine shores, of course, its all awesome from sea to shinning sea. So don’t be troubled. Buy the dip.

Never mind that we are in month 74 of this so-called recovery and that after year upon year of promised “escape velocity” the reliable signs of said event are still few and far between. But the “recovery” narrative stays alive because there is always some stray factoids of seasonally maladjusted, yet-to-be-revised “incoming data” that can excite the MSM headline writers and bubble vision talking heads.

Today the data on construction spending and housing took their turn in the awesome circle. Thank heavens that the headline writing software used by the financial press doesn’t yet read graphical data. Otherwise they might have reported that private residential construction soared in July—–well, all the way back to January 2002 levels!

And those are the nominal dollars that the Fed has done its level best to depreciate in the 13 years since then. In fact, on an inflation-adjusted basis the housing construction spend is still at 1992 levels.

What had the headline software giddy, of course, was the year over year comps, which were in double digits. Yet did the talking heads bother to note the deep hook in last summer’s data?

No they didn’t. Otherwise they might have seen that the two-year stack in July came in at a hardly fulsome 3.7% annual rate and that nominal private housing spending is still 7% below December 2007 and 43% below the early 2006 peak.

More importantly, they might have noticed that this is no longer your grandfather’s housing market. The US housing stock got way over-built during the Greenspan bubble and the incoming generation of home-buyers has gotten buried in $1.2 trillion of student debt.

So notwithstanding the mini-boom in multi-family apartment construction, the $380 billion annual rate of spending in July amounted to only 2.1% of GDP. That’s the same rock bottom ratio registered in July 2013, and is clear evidence that the housing needle has not really moved at all.


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How Tethered to China are the Wall Street Banks?

Courtesy of Pam Martens

Shanghai's Bull Statue on Its Bund Waterfront (left); Bull Statue in Lower Manhattan (right)

Shanghai’s Bull Statue on Its Bund Waterfront (left); Bull Statue in Lower Manhattan (right)

The Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged 469.6 points yesterday for a loss of 2.84 percent but Wall Street banks and trading firms took a far heavier bruising. Business media have been placing the blame for global stock market convulsions on China’s slowing economy, devaluation of its currency and seemingly unstoppable selloffs in its wildly inflated stock market. There would seem to be much more to this story than we know so far to explain the outsized fall in Wall Street bank stocks.

Yesterday, with the Dow losing 2.84 percent, the major names on Wall Street fared as follows: Citigroup, down 4.75 percent; Bank of America, down 4.65 percent; Wells Fargo, down 4.39 percent; JPMorgan Chase, down 4.13 percent; Morgan Stanley, down 3.86 percent; and Goldman Sachs, down 3.44 percent. The Blackstone Group, a private equity firm with significant involvement in China, lost 5.26 percent.

These outsized losses versus the Dow’s performance are becoming the norm among the Wall Street banks. In just three trading sessions on Thursday, August 20, Friday, August 21 and Monday, August 24, JPMorgan Chase lost 10.87 percent of its market cap or $27.18 billion. Despite JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon’s serial reminders of the bank’s “fortress balance sheet,” the market is unconvinced. One has to ask why.

One explanation making the rounds on Wall Street is that even if some of these Wall Street mega banks don’t have a lot of direct exposure to China, they do have a lot of direct exposure to loans they have made to countries and corporate customers who depend on China for earnings. China is the largest buyer of industrial commodities in the world and its economic slowdown and attendant collapse in commodity prices – from oils to metals to agricultural products – is making repayment of loans to banks look riskier.

The major Wall Street banks also have Prime Brokerage relationships with the major hedge funds, a fancy way of saying they provide margin and loans of securities for risky trading.  A growing number of hedge funds have been taking a pounding as trading becomes more erratic.

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Just When You Thought It Couldn’t Get Worse For Brazil…

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Brazil’s economy is incredible. 

Just when you’re sure – and we mean sure – that it can’t possibly get any worse, or at least not materially worse in the very short-term, something else happens to further underscore the deep, dark economic malaise plaguing one of the world’s most important emerging markets. 

So after last Friday’s GDP print which confirmed that the country slid into recession during Q2 – a quarter in which Brazilians suffered through the worst inflation-growth outcome in at least a decade – and after July’s budget data which confirmed that the country’s fiscal situation is, as Citi put it, “a bloody terror film,” we got a look at industrial production today and boy, oh boy, was it bad. So bad in fact, that it missed even the lowest analyst expectations.

Here are some key excerpts from Goldman's breakdown:

Sharp Decline in Industrial Production in July

IP contracted by a much larger than expected -1.5% mom sa (-8.9% yoy) in July (vs. the -0.1% mom sa market consensus). Furthermore, the June print was revised down to -0.9% mom sa from the original -0.3% mom sa. During the last nine months industrial production declined at an average monthly rate of -0.9% mom sa. Of the 24 main industrial segments, 14 recorded a contraction of output in July.

IP declined 8.9% yoy in July, with the largest decline recorded in capital goods -27.8%. Overall, IP declined 6.6% yoy during January-July 2015.

IP has now contracted for eight consecutive quarters and is likely to decline again during 3Q2015.

In July, IP was 14.1% below the peak level registered in June 2013 and was at the same level as March-April 2006.

The industrial sector (which has been reducing headcount) contracted 1.1% in 2014 and we expect it to contract at a much higher rate in 2015 as it continues to face strong headwinds from high levels of inventories, record low confidence indicators, a high and rising tax burden, rising energy costs, and weak external demand (particularly from Argentina for durable goods). 

Meanwhile, exports cratered 24% and critically, it wasn't all because of lower commodity prices.

CDS now at six-year wides…

 





Wage Growth Meme Destroyed – Unit Labor Costs Tumble At Fastest Pace In A Year

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Unit Labor Costs dropped 1.4% in Q2, missing expectations of a 1.2% drop and falling to the lowest since Q2 2014. Despite all the sound and fury and wage growth looming any minute now… it is not! This is the first consecutive drop in unit labor costs since Q4 2008.

Charts: Bloomberg





Odds Favor A Year-End Rally…After A New Low

 

Odds Favor A Year-End Rally…After A New Low

Courtesy of Dana Lyons' Tumblr

image

August 6-month lows have had a tendency to be broken in the coming months, prior to a year-end bounce.

After getting kicked in the teeth in August, the stock market is starting out September by getting stomped on the head. Following the historic rebound to end last week, investors were hoping that the worst was behind them. As we noted regarding such rebounds yesterday, however, perhaps we should not be surprised by renewed weakness. And adding further evidence to support the “retest” scenario versus the “V-bottom” scenario, today’s post looks at 6-month lows in the S&P 500 occurring in August and the resultant performance through the end of the year.

Going back to 1950, this is the 13th year in which the S&P 500 has reached a 6-month low (on an intraday-basis), the most of any month besides July and October. Here are the 13 years:

  • 1953
  • 1966
  • 1971
  • 1973
  • 1974
  • 1977
  • 1981
  • 1982
  • 1990
  • 1998
  • 2004
  • 2011
  • 2015

How did the S&P 500 react to these August lows? Here is a chart showing the performance of the index from September 1 through year-end in each of the years listed above (FYI, the chart indicates performance based on the % above or below the August low).

 

image

 

First of all, apologies for the busy chart. Second of all, are there any patterns consistent enough to take into consideration when navigating the next 4 months? Well, that’s up to you, but there are a few notable tendencies among the sample of 12 prior instances.

  • 10 of the 12 years saw the S&P 500 drop below the August at some point before the end of the year.
  • Only 1982 and 2004 saw the S&P 500 hold above the August low through year-end.
  • The median low-point among the entire sample was -3.7% below the August


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Fed Apologist Ritholtz Interviews Fed Apologist McCulley

Courtesy of Mish.

Bloomberg columnist Barry Ritholtz interviewed Paul McCulley, former chief economist at PIMCO, and often mentioned FOMC candidate on the Fed’s performance.

The Podcast is over two hours long, so let’s just go with Ritholtz’s brief summary: McCulley Demands Apology on Behalf of the Fed.

McCulley noted those who claimed QE and ZIRP were going to cause inflation and the collapse of the dollar were totally wrong, and he demanded these critics of the Federal Reserve owe former Ben Bernanke an apology. Had the Fed Chief listened to them, we would have found ourselves in a modern day depression.

He is leery of those who believe the Government and Federal Reserve should have let the crisis run its course on its own, with zero interventions. He is especially harsh on the Austerians, whom he said made the recovery weaker than it need be by thwarting traditional Keynesian stimulus.

The full podcast is available on iTunes, SoundCloud and on Bloomberg.

Rebuttal

In a blend of a monetarist and Keynesian thinking, McCulley supports Fed policies of QE and is “especially harsh on the Austerians, whom he said made the recovery weaker than it need be by thwarting traditional Keynesian stimulus.”

For starters, I dispute the notion that without QE and intervention that “we would have found ourselves in a modern day depression” as Ritholtz maintains. Ritholtz’s claim is a poorly-formed hypothesis presented as fact.

Yes, it’s true that many in the Austrian camp predicted a dollar crash and high inflation. But I am in the Austrian camp camp and debt deflation has been my model, and still is my model.

As for an apology, what about an apology from the Fed for blowing serial bubble after bubble of increasing amplitude?

It’s inane to demand an apology from those who warned in advance, and correctly so, of the housing bubble and subsequent crash.

In a twist of irony, McCulley gloats over the alleged lack of inflation, but it’s pretty clear he has his blinders on as to what inflation is and ways it can be spotted. In the case of Fed policy, inflation did not manifest itself in the CPI, but rather in asset bubbles, again and again.

Challenge to Keynesians



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6 reasons the FOMC is unlikely to move in September

 

6 reasons the FOMC is unlikely to move in September

Courtesy of Sober Look

The majority of economists still expect the Federal Reserve to begin the long-awaited liftoff next month.

However is this dovish FOMC truly prepared to "pull the trigger" this time? Here are some reasons the central bank is likely to delay the first hike.

1. While the Fed officially talks about not being focused on the currency markets, the recent dollar rally should give them some food for thought. The global "currency wars" have sent the trade-weighted US dollar to the highest levels in over a decade. This will continue to put pressure on US manufacturing (and even some services sectors) as US labor and other costs of production rise relative to other nations.
 

 

2. Commodity prices, led by crude oil and industrial metals, hit new multi-year lows, reigniting disinflationary pressures. Note that the Bloomberg Commodity Index is at the lowest level since 2002. Some at the Fed continue to view this as "transient", but the full impact of such a move is yet to be fully felt in the economy. Here is a broad commodities index.
 

 

Source: barchart


In fact as of Sunday night in NY, WTI futures are trading below $40/bbl.
 

Source: barchart


3. Driven to a large extent by commodity prices as well as economic weakness in China, US breakeven inflation expectations are declining sharply as well. Does this look like a great environment to begin raising rates?
 

4. Some point to the recent stability in "core inflation", with CPI ex food and energy remaining around 1.8% and providing support for a less accommodative policy. However the main driver of this stability is the rising cost of shelter. Core CPI excluding shelter is below 1% (YoY).

 


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Weapons of Economic Misdirection

 

Thoughts from the Frontline: Weapons of Economic Misdirection

By John Mauldin

“Measurement theory shows that strong assumptions are required for certain statistics to provide meaningful information about reality. Measurement theory encourages people to think about the meaning of their data. It encourages critical assessment of the assumptions behind the analysis.

“In ‘pure’ science, we can form a better, more coherent, and objective picture of the world, based on the information measurement provides. The information allows us to create models of (parts of) the world and formulate laws and theorems. We must then determine (again) by measuring whether these models, hypotheses, theorems, and laws are a valid representation of the world.”

Gauri Shankar Shrestha

“In science, the term observer effect refers to changes that the act of observation will make on a phenomenon being observed. This is often the result of instruments that, by necessity, alter the state of what they measure in some manner.

“It was, perhaps, the most unusual episode in the long running duel between the two giants of twentieth century economic thought. During World War Two, John Maynard Keynes and Friedrich Hayek spent all night together, alone, on the roof of the chapel of King’s College, Cambridge. Their task was to gaze at the skies and watch for German bombers aiming to pour incendiary bombs upon the picturesque small cities of England….

“Night after night the faculty and students of King’s, armed with shovels, took it in turns to man the roof of the ornate Gothic chapel, whose foundation stone was laid by Henry VI in 1441. The fire watchmen of St. Paul’s Cathedral in London had discovered that there was no recourse against an exploding bomb, but if an incendiary could be tipped over the edge of the parapet before it set fire to the roof, damage could be kept to a minimum. And so Keynes, just short of sixty years old, and Hayek, aged forty-one, sat and waited for the impending German onslaught, their shovels propped against the limestone balustrade. They were joined by a common fear that they would not emerge brave nor nimble enough to save their venerable stone charge.”

– Nicholas Wapshot in Keynes Hayek: The


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The Mark Of A Bear (Market)

Courtesy of Lance Roberts at STA Wealth Management

In this past weekend's missive "Market Bounces, Now Execute Sells," the long consolidation process that began early this year finally resolved itself. Unfortunately, the resolution was to the downside as market stresses from China, the threat of rising interest rates and ongoing economic weakness finally overwhelmed the seemingly impervious bullish sentiment.

While the now "official correction" was not a surprise, and is something I warned of repeatedly over the last several months, it is possible that this is more than just a "buy the dip" opportunity. As I stated last Tuesday:

"Is this something more than just a simple correction? The honest answer is that no one really knows. The bulls are "hoping" that the worst is over and that the current bull market will resume its upward trend. However, there is ample evidence suggesting that something else may be afoot from slowing domestic and international growth, collapsing commodities and falling inflationary pressures."

But the underlying fundamental and economic data have been weak for some time, yet the market continued its unabated rise. The Bulls have remained firmly in charge of the markets as the reach for returns exceeded the grasp of the underlying risk. It now seems that has changed. For the first time since 2007, as we see initial markings of a potential bear market cycle.

The first chart below shows the long-term trend of the market.

SP500-Technical-090115

The bottom part of the chart is the most important. For the first time since 2000 or 2007, the market has now registered a momentum based "sell" signal. Importantly, this is a very different reading that what was seen during the 2010 and 2011 "corrections" and suggests the current correction may be more significant.

The chart above is also confirmed by numerous other indications that also support the "mark of the bear."

SP500-Technical-090115-5

Importantly, notice that during the 2010 and 2011 corrections, which were ultimately halted by rapid interventions by the Federal Reserve, "sell signals" were never triggered. Currently, those signals have been triggered at levels that have only been witnessed during more severe bear market corrections.

Fed To The Rescue?


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Rigor Mortis Of The Robo-Machines

Courtesy of David Stockman of Contra Corner

Call it the rigor mortis of the robo-machines. About 430 days ago the S&P 500 crossed the 1973 mark for the first time – the same point where it settled today.

In between there has been endless reflexive thrashing in the trading range highlighted below. As is evident, the stock averages have not “climbed” the proverbial wall of worry; they have jerked and twitched to a series of short-lived new highs, which have now been abandoned.

Surely most thinking investors have left the casino by now. So what remains is chart driven trading programs, racing madly up, then down, then back up again – rinsing and repeating with ever more furious intensity.

^SPX Chart

^SPX data by YCharts

Accordingly, it goes without saying that the central bank driven casinos which now pass for financial markets are no place for savers, investors, rational speculators or any other known type of carbon unit. More than 80 months of ZIRP and nearly two decades of central bank financial repression have destroyed free market price discovery and eviscerated all of the normal mechanisms of stability and discipline that govern functioning markets.

Long ago short sellers were destroyed by the Greenspan/Bernanke/Yellen “put” and the endless cycle of buy-on-the-dip upswings that took the market averages to ever more lunatic levels. At the same time, speculators came to realize that their free money carry trades were not at risk because the Keynesian statists who have usurped control of the central banks promised to give them months and months of warning before tampering with their guaranteed cost of carry by even so much as 25 basis points.

Needless to say, this kind of “forward guidance” is endlessly praised by the talking heads of bubble vision as some kind of enlightened form of central bank honesty and transparency. No surprises and all that.

Please! Transparency in manipulating and pegging the price of money is not constructive monetary statesmanship; it is a front runner’s dream and as anti-market as it gets.

For crying out loud, if you tell speculators that their overnight carry cost is pinned to the second decimal place for months into the future, they will bid anything in sight that has a yield or appreciation potential, fund it in the money market directly or indirectly, and roll the carry night…
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Market News

News You Can Use From Phil's Stock World

 

Financial Markets and Economy

Charting the Markets: China Respite (Bloomberg)

China watchers are taking a breather with the nation's markets closed to commemorate the end of World War II. Attention now turns to today's European Central Bank monetary policy meeting in Frankfurt and Friday's U.S. jobs report. Global stocks, as measured by the MSCI All-Country World Index, gained for a second session after after a two-day 3.3 percent drop.

...



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Phil's Favorites

Third Quarter GDP Model Inches Up to 1.5% on Auto Strength

Courtesy of Mish.

The Atlanta Fed third quarter GDPNow Forecast inched up today, primarily based on August motor vehicle sales.

The GDPNow model forecast for real GDP growth (seasonally adjusted annual rate) in the third quarter of 2015 is 1.5 percent on September 3, up from 1.3 percent on September 1. The nowcast for third-quarter real personal consumption expenditures growth ticked up from 2.6 percent to 2.7 percent following yesterday afternoon's release on August motor vehicle sales from the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis.

GDPNow Forecast September 3, 2015



Blue Chip Lag

...



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Zero Hedge

This Is What The Historic "Risk Parity" Blow Up Looked Like

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

One of the buzz words used to explain the violent, sharp and unexpected market moves over the past two weeks, is "risk parity" popularized by Bridgewater's Pure Alpha fund (which also happens to be the largest in the world, excluding AAPL, the ECB and the Fed) and rather the dramatic shifts in asset allocation among these investment strategies, which have wreaked havoc with all those "risk managers" (who are happy to manage the proceeds of their "2 and 20", if not so much the actual risk) YTD P&L. Why just today Omega' Leon Cooperman blamed"risk-parity for the "the magnitude and velocity of the decline in...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

Change investment allocations due to .2% of a move?

Courtesy of Chris Kimble.

Can you believe that its a really big deal to some if an index is down 9.9% from it highs (non correction territory) or if its down 10.1% (correction territory).  Does .2% constitute that we make a different allocation decision? Are you kidding me?

Do you find yourself agreeing more with the person on the left or right? I am in the camp with Lou on the right. Should we make investment decisions based upon a term (correction)? Not me

CLICK ON CHART TO ENLARGE

This chart looks at the Dow since 2010 ...



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Insider Scoop

Verint Systems Is 'Laser Focused'

Courtesy of Benzinga.

Related VRNT Wednesday's After-Hours Movers: 7 Stocks To Watch Keep an Eye on These 10 Stocks for September 2, 2015 Verint down 5.2% due to soft FY16 guidance (Seeking Alpha)
  • Shares of Verint Systems Inc. (NASDAQ: VRNT) have declined more than 20 percent over the last three months....


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Chart School

Gann Angle Apple Inc Review

Courtesy of Read the Ticker.

Time to review Apple Inc with the Gann Angle.

Gann Angles may work best on either daily trading days, daily calendar days, or weekly. All should be considered.

In the chart below Apple Inc works very well. Gann Angles with Fibonacci arc forecasts do work well together.

Any bounce of Apple Inc into previous resistance should be considered as a possible short. Watching and waiting.



Click for popup. Clear your browser cache if image is not showing.



NOTE: readtheticker.com does allow users to load objects and text on charts, however some annotations are by a free third party image tool named Paint.net

Investing Quote...

.."Tape reading was an...



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All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: David is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of August 31st, 2015

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Sabrient

Sector Detector: Finally, market capitulation gives bulls a real test of conviction, plus perhaps a buying opportunity

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

The dark veil around China is creating a little too much uncertainty for investors, with the usual fear mongers piling on and sending the vast buy-the-dip crowd running for the sidelines until the smoke clears. Furthermore, Sabrient’s fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings have been flashing near-term defensive signals. The end result is a long overdue capitulation event that has left no market segment unscathed in its mass carnage. The historically long technical consolidation finally came to the point of having to break one way or the other, and it decided to break hard to the downside, actually testing the lows from last ...



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ValueWalk

Some Hedge Funds "Hedged" During Stock Market Sell Off, Others Not As Risk Focused

By Mark Melin. Originally published at ValueWalk.

With the VIX index jumping 120 percent on a weekly basis, the most in its history, and with the index measuring volatility or "fear" up near 47 percent on the day, one might think professional investors might be concerned. While the sell off did surprise some, certain hedge fund managers have started to dip their toes in the water to buy stocks they have on their accumulation list, while other algorithmic strategies are actually prospering in this volatile but generally consistently trending market.

Stock market sell off surprises some while others were prepared and are hedged prospering

While so...



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Digital Currencies

Bitcoin Battered After "Governance Coup"

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Naysyers are warning that the recent plunge in Bitcoin prices - from almost $318 at its peak during the Greek crisis, to $221 yesterday - is due to growing power struggle over the future of the cryptocurrency that is dividing its lead developers. On Saturday, a rival version of the current software was released by two bitcoin big guns. As Reuters reports, Bitcoin XT would increase the block size to 8 megabytes enabling more transactions to be processed every second. Those who oppose Bitcoin XT say the bigger block size jeopardizes the vision of a decentralized payments system that bitcoin is built on with some believing ...



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Pharmboy

Baxter's Spinoff

Reminder: Pharmboy and Ilene are available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Baxter Int. (BAX) is splitting off its BioSciences division into a new company called Baxalta. Shares of Baxalta will be given as a tax-free dividend, in the ratio of one to one, to BAX holders on record on June 17, 2015. That means, if you want to receive the Baxalta dividend, you need to buy the stock this week (on or before June 12).

The Baxalta Spinoff

By Ilene with Trevor of Lowenthal Capital Partners and Paul Price

In its recent filing with the SEC, Baxter provides:

“This information statement is being ...



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Mapping The Market

An update on oil proxies

Courtesy of Jean-Luc Saillard

Back in December, I wrote a post on my blog where I compared the performances of various ETFs related to the oil industry. I was looking for the best possible proxy to match the moves of oil prices if you didn't want to play with futures. At the time, I concluded that for medium term trades, USO and the leveraged ETFs UCO and SCO were the most promising. Longer term, broader ETFs like OIH and XLE might make better investment if oil prices do recover to more profitable prices since ETF linked to futures like USO, UCO and SCO do suffer from decay. It also seemed that DIG and DUG could be promising if OIH could recover as it should with the price of oil, but that they don't make a good proxy for the price of oil itself. 

Since...



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Promotions

Watch the Phil Davis Special on Money Talk on BNN TV!

Kim Parlee interviews Phil on Money Talk. Be sure to watch the replays if you missed the show live on Wednesday night (it was recorded on Monday). As usual, Phil provides an excellent program packed with macro analysis, important lessons and trading ideas. ~ Ilene

 

The replay is now available on BNN's website. For the three part series, click on the links below. 

Part 1 is here (discussing the macro outlook for the markets) Part 2 is here. (discussing our main trading strategies) Part 3 is here. (reviewing our pick of th...

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Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

"Hello PSW Members –

This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743

Thank you for you time!




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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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