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Media Reports It Wrong Again – Housing Starts Actually Plunged In November

Courtesy of Lee Adler of the Wall Street Examiner

Don’t believe everything you read in the mainstream media. Especially don’t believe anything in the financial news media until you’ve looked at the data yourself. It’s no wonder investors are so often caught flatfooted in the markets. Financial “journalists” feed their readers and viewers a constant stream of misinformation and bad data. Financial reporters are so atrocious at serving their audience I have to believe that they are, wittingly or unwittingly, part of a deliberate and elaborate campaign of disinformation… unless you believe in Coincidence Theory.

Housing starts collapsed in November. They weren’t good, they weren’t even so-so as media reports intimated. The seasonally adjusted annualized number which the paid flacks report is absolute nonsense. It’s fiction.

Actual, not seasonally adjusted single family starts were down by 10,400 units in November to 47,700 units. November is always a down month but this was the worst November performance since 2008, in the teeth of the housing crash.  On a year to year basis starts were down by 6.3%. It’s absurd that you can’t find that fact anywhere near the mainstream media headlines. In fact, Bloomberg outright lied about it, “While housing starts declined 1.6 percent…” They used the fictitious data. It’s not ok to use seasonally adjusted data because it “usually” accurately reflects the trend.It is especially not ok to use it when reporting the year to year change, which obviously has NO seasonality.

Multifamily starts fell 10.6% year over year.

A picture tells the story at a glance.

Housing Starts - Click to enlarge

This kind of misimpression happens often enough that it is damaging and dangerous, fooling not only the public and the media which disseminates it, but also the genius clowns who make policy.

Get regular updates on the machinations of the Fed, Treasury, Primary Dealers and foreign central banks in the US market, in the Fed Report in the Professional Edition, Money Liquidity, and Real Estate Package. Click this link to try WSE's Professional Edition risk free for 30 days!




Someone Is Lying

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Yesterday, moments before the North Korea "hacking" tragicomedy escalated into full retard mode with Sony pulling The Interview, or a movie that absent the attention would certainly be a flop, Wired released an article titled: "North Korea Almost Certainly Did Not Hack Sony" (title subsequently changed to the one below as can be seen in the URL alias "http://www.wired.com/2014/12/north-korea-did-not-hack-sony-probs"), which however, and for the better, retains its content as it is quite critical in debunking the latest government "certainty."

Continue reading here for the full story, because moments after the Wired piece hit, we got this "confirmation" from the NYT:

It is quite clear that someone is lying (we leave it up to readers to decide who). The question is "why"?





Meet the Men and Women on the Hill Who Told Citigroup to Go to Hell

Courtesy of Pam Martens.

There has been much focus on the fiery speeches that Senator Elizabeth Warren delivered from the Senate floor in an effort to stop the roll-back of a key derivatives provision of the Dodd-Frank financial reform legislation that was slipped into the giant $1.1 trillion spending bill that was signed into law this week by President Obama – who campaigned for passage of the bill despite the weakening of protections against Wall Street abuses. The bill became known as the Cromnibus because it is part Continuing Resolution and part Omnibus spending bill to fund the government through September of 2015. Those who voted against the bill in the Senate are provided here; in the House, here.

But Warren was far from alone in expressing outrage at Citigroup writing most of the provision  that was quietly slipped into a spending bill that was critical to pass to avoid a government shutdown. Members of both the House and Senate, from broadly diverse political leanings, not only spoke out against the provision but voted against the spending bill to back up that outrage.

We’ll get to the still festering outrage among members of Congress in a moment, but first a warning for the next member of Congress who might be asked by a slick Wall Street bank lobbyist to try a similar maneuver. The House Rep who slipped the provision into the spending bill, which was effectively written by Citigroup according to Mother Jones and the New York Times, is Kevin Yoder of Kansas.

Yoder is now being viciously assailed on his own Facebook page and held up to public ridicule in Kansas newspapers. On Facebook, a woman identifying herself as Amy Hanks calls Yoder the “lowest of the low” and adds: “Hope you burn in hell.” Another woman calls Yoder “one greedy immoral coward.” OpenSecrets.org shows “Securities and Investment” as the number one industry contributing to Yoder’s campaign committee and leadership PAC.

Senator Sherrod Brown

Senator Sherrod Brown

Citigroup received the largest taxpayer bailout in history during the financial crisis as a result of its unchecked derivatives: $45 billion in TARP funds; over $306 billion in asset guarantees; and more than $2 trillion in low-cost loans from the Fed according to the General Accountability Office. The abject repulsion that the very bank that got the biggest handout and played…
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“Q4 GDP Below 2%, December Payrolls Under 200,000″ Markit Warns As Service PMI Crashes To 10-Month Low

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

"Another bumper month of non-farm payroll growth looks unlikely in December, with private sector payroll growth unlikely to breach the 200,000 mark," warns Markit after The US Services PMI plunged to 53.6, missing expectations of 56.3 by the most on record. This is the 6th straight month of declines. Job creation slumped to 8-month lows. The Composite (Services & Manufacturing) PMI plunged to its lowest level since October 2013. Still exuberant? Still hopeful? Here's Markit's summary, "A sharp slowing in service sector activity alongside a similar easing in the manufacturing sector takes the overall rate of economic expansion down to the weakest since October 2013. The extent of the slowdown suggests that economic growth in the fourth quarter could come in below 2%"

All the mid-year exuberance, demolished in its cyclically adjusted reality…

As Employment plunges…

Commenting on the flash PMI data, Chris Williamson, chief economist at Markit said:

“A sharp slowing in service sector activity alongside a similar easing in the manufacturing sector takes the overall rate of economic expansion down to the weakest since October 2013. The extent of the slowdown suggests that economic growth in the fourth quarter could come in below 2% which, with the exception of the downturn caused by adverse weather in the first quarter, would be the worst performance for two years.

“The slowdown is linked to weaker growth of new business as customers becoming increasingly worried about the economic outlook both at home and abroad, with the prospect of higher interest rates cooling demand alongside side rising global geopolitical concerns. Across both manufacturing and services, new business grew in December at a pace well below the rates of expansion seen earlier in the year.

“Job creation has also slowed sharply alongside the cooling of demand, and payroll numbers across both sectors showed the smallest rise for eight months. Another bumper month of non-farm payroll growth looks unlikely in December, with private sector payroll growth unlikely to breach the 200,000 mark.”

Buy everything.





The Russian Enigma Unravels


Courtesy of Marc to Market

 

Winston Churchill famously said of Russian foreign policy that it was "…a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma."  What people leave out is what followed.  Churchill offered an answer:  "… perhaps there is a key. That key is Russian national interest."
 
And so it is.
 
Like most crises, the crisis Russia is experiencing is over-determined, in the sense there are several causes.  The actions in Ukraine, and particularly the annexation of Crimea, and the continued destabilization of East Ukraine spurred sanctions from the US and Europe.  The sanctions, especially the ban on access to the short-term funding markets in the US and Europe, are more significant given the other developments. 
 
However, other causes of Russia's difficult straits stems from two developments largely out of its control.  The first is the end of the international markets affection toward emerging markets.  The multi-year bullish EM phase was a function of a number of factors, like low and falling US interest rates, a weak US dollar, rising commodity prices, and a rapidly growing China, that no longer exist.   Russia, like many emerging market countries, did not take advantage of the commodity boom to diversify the economy. 
 
The second development that was largely outside of Russia's influence is the dramatic decline in oil prices.  Even if Russia did not antagonize Saudi Arabia by supporting the Syrian and Iranian regime, Saudi Arabia would most likely have responded to the challenges represented by the US shale producers, Canadian tar sands and other non-OPEC producers.  OPEC itself faces governance issues and enforcement challenges.. 
 
The economic crisis Russia is facing is severe.  However, talk of an imminent Russian default is misplaced.  Russia appears to have $380-$400 bln of reserves.   Not all of these are liquid.  Many in the blogosphere heralded Russia’s purchases of gold as a way to diversify away from fiat currencies.  Russia has more than 10% of its reserves in gold and it is cumbersome to use to intervene or to offset a currency mismatch.  Of course, it earns no yield either.  Another $170 bln of reserves are part


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Why College Is Necessary But Gets You Nowhere

Why College Is Necessary But Gets You Nowhere

Courtesy of Robert Reich

This is the time of year when high school seniors apply to college, and when I get lots of mail about whether college is worth the cost.

The answer is unequivocally yes, but with one big qualification. I’ll come to the qualification in a moment but first the financial case for why it’s worth going to college.

Put simply, people with college degrees continue to earn far more than people without them. And that college “premium” keeps rising.

Last year, Americans with four-year college degrees earned on average 98 percent more per hour than people without college degrees.

In the early 1980s, graduates earned 64 percent more.

So even though college costs are rising, the financial return to a college degree compared to not having one is rising even faster.

But here’s the qualification, and it’s a big one.

A college degree no longer guarantees a good job. The main reason it pays better than the job of someone without a degree is the latter’s wages are dropping.

In fact, it’s likely that new college graduates will spend some years in jobs for which they’re overqualified.

According to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, 46 percent of recent college graduates are now working in jobs that don’t require college degrees. (The same is true for more than a third of college graduates overall.)

Their employers still choose college grads over non-college grads on the assumption that more education is better than less.

As a result, non-grads are being pushed into ever more menial work, if they can get work at all. Which is a major reason why their pay is dropping.

What’s going on? For years we’ve been told globalization and technological advances increase the demand for well-educated workers. (Confession: I was one of the ones making this argument.)

This was correct until around 2000. But since then two things have reversed the trend.

First, millions of people in developing nations are now far better educated, and the Internet has given them an easy way to sell their skills in advanced economies like the United States.


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Don’t Get Ruined by These 10 Popular Investment Myths (Part X)

Don't Get Ruined by These 10 Popular Investment Myths (Part X)

Interest rates, oil prices, earnings, GDP, wars, peace, terrorism, inflation, monetary policy, etc. — NONE have a reliable effect on the stock market

By Elliott Wave International

You may remember that after the 2008-2009 crash, many called into question traditional economic models. Why did they fail?  And more importantly, will they warn us of a new approaching doomsday, should there be one?

This series gives you a well-researched answer. Here is the conclusion of this 10-part series.


Myth #10: "Central banks and government policies control the markets."
By Robert Prechter (excerpted from the monthly Elliott Wave Theorist; published since 1979)

Virtually everyone believes this statement; certainly most economists do. Keynesians and monetarists believe that authorities can control the money supply and interest rates, and most neo-Austrians believe that the Fed is all-powerful when it comes to inflating: Whatever inflation rate it wants, it simply manufactures.

Not long ago [in late 2008 -- Ed.] the U.S. government announced that it will fully back the debt of the mortgage companies it created (Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac); it pledged to use taxpayers' money and borrow unlimited amounts to fund banks that it deems "too big to fail," while pledging that the FDIC will fund shortfalls at all other banks. At the same time, the world's top central banks offered unlimited credit at near-zero interest rates, in other words, free money.

According to the exogenous-cause model, these historic pledges and bailouts should have had immediate results. Take a look at Figure 20. Can you tell where on this graph of stock prices authorities took these actions?

According to the economists' beliefs, the only rational place for them to have taken place would be at the bottom of the market. The minute the authorities began flooding the market with liquidity is the minute it should have turned up.

Figure 21 shows that in fact these actions took place in the early portion of the biggest stock market decline in 76 years. These actions did not push stock prices back up. The market finally bottomed months later, at a time when nothing…
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Napoleon vs. Cheney: “Interrogation That Actually Works”; Icing on the “Hate-Cake”

Courtesy of Mish.

Not only is torture against international law, it also produces no useful intelligence. Common sense is enough to prove that statement.

If someone threatened to rape your sister, kill your mom,  or shackled you until you were half-dead while feeding you up your anus, you would say nearly anything to ease the pain. So would I, and so would everyone else. Anyone who disagrees is either a liar or a fool.

Even Napoleon recognized that fact.

Warning: This is a very long post. Please allow adequate time to read and digest what follows. I sincerely appreciate your effort to reading this post in entirety. Thanks.

From a Napoleon Letter to Louis Alexandre Berthier in November 1798: "The barbarous custom of having men beaten who are suspected of having important secrets to reveal must be abolished. It has always been recognized that this way of interrogating men, by putting them to torture, produces nothing worthwhile. The poor wretches say anything that comes into their mind and what they think the interrogator wishes to know."

Precisely.

"I'd Do It Again in a Minute"

Regardless of the complete futility and illegality of torture, former vice president Dick Cheney Pushes Back on Torture Report: 'I'd Do It Again in a Minute'.

"I'd do it again in a minute," Cheney told Meet the Press's Chuck Todd, offering an unqualified condemnation of the Senate Intelligence Committee's investigation into the Bush administration's post-9/11 interrogation methods used at foreign "black sites," which many regard as torture.

When asked about rectal feeding, which the Senate torture report said at least five detainees were subjected to, Cheney acknowledged that it was not approved as part of the program and said he believed it was done for "medical reasons." The Senate report said there is no evidence medical need was a factor for rectal hydration.

Cheney also didn't blink when asked about the report's findings that at least 26 of 119 detainees were wrongfully held, including two former CIA operatives and a mentally challenged man.

"I'm more concerned with the bad guys that were released than the few that were, in fact, innocent," said Cheney, adding that the man who became ISIS's leader, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, was held in custody by the U.S. military in Iraq before being released in 2004.

No Concern for Innocents

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The Coin of the Realm: How Inside Traders Are Rigging America

The Coin of the Realm: How Inside Traders Are Rigging America

Courtesy of Robert Reich

A few years ago, hedge fund Level Global Investors made $54 million selling Dell Computer stock based on insider information from a Dell employee. When charged with illegal insider trading, Global Investors’ co-founder Anthony Chiasson claimed he didn’t know where the tip came from.

Chiasson argued that few traders on Wall Street ever know where the inside tips they use come from because confidential information is, in his words, the “coin of the realm in securities markets.”

Last week the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, which oversees federal prosecutions of Wall Street, agreed. It overturned Chiasson’s conviction, citing lack of evidence Chaisson received the tip directly, or knew insiders were leaking confidential information in exchange for some personal benefit.

The Securities and Exchange Act of 1934 banned insider trading but left it up to the Securities and Exchange Commission and the courts to define it. Which they have – in recent decades so broadly that confidential information is indeed the coin of the realm.

If a CEO tells his golf buddy that his company is being taken over, and his buddy makes a killing on that information, no problem. If his buddy leaks the information to a hedge-fund manager like Chiasson, and doesn’t tell Chiasson where it comes from, Chiasson can also use the information to make a bundle.

Major players on Wall Street have been making tons of money not because they’re particularly clever but because they happen to be in the realm where a lot of coins come their way.

Last year, the top twenty-five hedge fund managers took home, on average, almost one billion dollars each. Even run-of-the-mill portfolio managers at large hedge funds averaged $2.2 million each.

Another person likely to be exonerated by the court’s ruling is Michael Steinberg, of the hedge fund SAC Capital Advisors, headed by Stephen A. Cohen.

In recent years several of Cohen’s lieutenants have been convicted of illegal insider trading. Last year Cohen himself had to pay a stiff penalty and close down SAC because of the charges, after making many billions. 

SAC managed so much money that it handed over large commissions to bankers on


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Pass the Cigars: US Lifts Some Restrictions on Cuba; Why Now?

Courtesy of Mish.

Sanctions and embargoes don't work. And in the case of Cuba, it took the US 52 years to partially realize that.

In 1962, President John F. Kennedy singed into law a Cuban trade embargo. I have long known how foolish Kennedy's decision was (and the decision of every president since).  But I did not know until today how blatantly hypocritical Kennedy's action was.

A clip from Cigars All Around in the Financial Times explains: 

The day before Kennedy signed the law, "Kennedy ordered an aide to buy him 1,000 Petit Upmanns cigars. It was only after Kennedy got word that his request had been carried out that he authorised the new regulations that banned Cuban imports and would have made the purchase illegal."

Wow.

For 52 years, the US embargo poisoned he Cuba-US relationship. What good did it do? Did it drive Casto out of power? Or did it help keep Castro in power?

I suggest the latter.

Free trade is always beneficial and always better that war or cold war. US goods flowing into Cuba and tourists with money would have done more for a regime change than pressure.

Hopefully it won't take 52 years for the US to realize the stupidity of sanctions on Russia. Don't hold your breath.

Cuba's Support of Terrorism

The Financial Times notes "Obama ordered a six month review of Cuba’s designation as a 'state sponsor of terrorism'. Even the State Department no longer attempts to justify this label, which devalues Washington’s word on international terrorism issues and triggers international financial sanctions against Cuba."

Continue here > 

[Picture via Pixabay]





 
 
 

Zero Hedge

Two NYPD Cops Murdered In "Execution Style" Ambush, Shooter Commits Suicide - Live Coverage

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

The simmering cold war involving the NYPD and various elements of New York's population just went nuclear when a little before 3:00 PM, reports hit that two NYPD officers were shot in their patrol car, and subsequently died, in what has been dubbed an "execution style" ambush in Brooklyn's Bed-Stuy area. The alleged shooter was chased by police and subsequently died of a self-inflicted gun wound.

Two Police Officers have been shot in the 79 pct. please pray for them

— NYPD 121st Precinct (@NYPD121Pct) December 20, 2014

According to ...



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Phil's Favorites

Evolution of YouTube: Will it Supplant Mainstream TV, Vanish, Evolve, or Languish?

Courtesy of Mish.

What will become of YouTube?

It started from nowhere about 10 years ago as an idea with no revenue and no content, then pretty quickly lots of content coupled with a plethora of copyright infringement lawsuits.

Today, YouTube gets 300 million hours of watching every day. Top content producers have millions of followers and make millions of dollars.

But where to from here?

New Play Button

The New York Times tackles that question in a fascinating story YouTube’s Chief, Hitting a New ‘Play’ Button.

The article is about Susan Wojcicki, the chief executive of YouTube, how she got her start, and in turn how Google got its s...



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All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: David is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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Insider Scoop

Oppenheimer Initiates Coverage On Twitter, Believes Stock Is Appropriately Priced At Current Levels

Courtesy of Benzinga.

Analysts at Oppenheimer initiated coverage of Twitter Inc (NYSE: TWTR) Friday by issuing a Perform rating and setting a $36.00 price target. Twitter is a global social networking platform with over 280 million active users.

The Numbers

While Oppenheimer analysts fully recognize the strength in Twitter as a company, they believe that Twitter’s stock is appropriately priced at current levels. “While TWTR is the best Internet platform for real-time content discovery, we believe that the stock’s current valuation of 10x 2015E sales, a 52% premium to peers, fully reflects future prospects based on current growth rates.”

Insider Dumping

Between November and December 2014, Twitter insiders have sold more than $...



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Chart School

Relief Bounce in Markets

Courtesy of Declan.

Those who took advantage of markets at Fib levels were rewarded.  However, this looked more a 'dead cat' style bounce than a genuine bottom forming low.  This can of course change, and one thing I will want to see is narrow action near today's high. Volume was a little light, but with Christmas fast approaching I would expect this trend to continue.

The S&P inched above 2,009, but I would like to see any subsequent weakness hold the 38.2% Fib level at 1,989.


The Nasdaq offered itself more as a support bounce, with a picture perfect play off its 38.2% Fib level. Unlike the S&P, volume did climb in confirmed accumulation. The next upside c...

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Digital Currencies

Chart o' the Day: Don't "Invest" in Stupid Sh*t

Joshua commented on the QZ article I posted a couple days ago and perfectly summarized the take-home message into an Investing Lesson. 

Chart o’ the Day: Don’t “Invest” in Stupid Sh*t

Courtesy of 

The chart above comes from Matt Phillips at Quartz and is a good reminder of why you shouldn’t invest in s...



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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of December 15th, 2014

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Sabrient

Sector Detector: Energy sector rains on bulls' parade, but skies may clear soon

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Scott Martindale of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Stocks have needed a reason to take a breather and pull back in this long-standing ultra-bullish climate, with strong economic data and seasonality providing impressive tailwinds -- and plummeting oil prices certainly have given it to them. But this minor pullback was fully expected and indeed desirable for market health. The future remains bright for the U.S. economy and corporate profits despite the collapse in oil, and now the overbought technical condition has been relieved. While most sectors are gathering fundamental support and our sector rotation model remains bullish, the Energy sector looks fundamentally weak and continues to ran...



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Stock World Weekly

Stock World Weekly

Newsletter writers are available to chat with Members regarding topics presented in SWW, comments are found below each post.

Here's this week's Stock World Weekly.

Click here and sign in with your user name and password. 

 

...

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Option Review

SPX Call Spread Eyes Fresh Record Highs By Year End

Stocks got off to a rocky start on the first trading day in December, with the S&P 500 Index slipping just below 2050 on Monday. Based on one large bullish SPX options trade executed on Wednesday, however, such price action is not likely to break the trend of strong gains observed in the benchmark index since mid-October. It looks like one options market participant purchased 25,000 of the 31Dec’14 2105/2115 call spreads at a net premium of $2.70 each. The trade cost $6.75mm to put on, and represents the maximum potential loss on the position should the 2105 calls expire worthless at the end of December. The call spread could reap profits of as much as $7.30 per spread, or $18.25mm, in the event that the SPX ends the year above 2115. The index would need to rally 2.0% over the current level...



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Market Shadows

Official Moves in the Market Shadows' Virtual Portfolio

By Ilene 

I officially bought 250 shares of EZCH at $18.76 and sold 300 shares of IGT at $17.09 in Market Shadows' Virtual Portfolio yesterday (Fri. 11-21).

Click here for Thursday's post where I was thinking about buying EZCH. After further reading, I decided to add it to the virtual portfolio and to sell IGT and several other stocks, which we'll be saying goodbye to next week.

Notes

1. th...



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Pharmboy

Biotechs & Bubbles

Reminder: Pharmboy is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Well PSW Subscribers....I am still here, barely.  From my last post a few months ago to now, nothing has changed much, but there are a few bargins out there that as investors, should be put on the watch list (again) and if so desired....buy a small amount.

First, the media is on a tear against biotechs/pharma, ripping companies for their drug prices.  Gilead's HepC drug, Sovaldi, is priced at $84K for the 12-week treatment.  Pundits were screaming bloody murder that it was a total rip off, but when one investigates the other drugs out there, and the consequences of not taking Sovaldi vs. another drug combinations, then things become clearer.  For instance, Olysio (JNJ) is about $66,000 for a 12-week treatment, but is approved for fewer types of patients AND...



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Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

"Hello PSW Members –

This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743

Thank you for you time!




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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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