1.1 C
New York
Monday, February 26, 2024

DEEP DEMOGRAPHIC DOO-DOO

DEEP DEMOGRAPHIC DOO-DOO

Courtesy of The Pragmatic Capitalist 

Interesting new commentary out of PIMCO by Bill Gross.  Mr. Gross has popularized the idea of the “new normal”.  In this month’s missive he discusses one of the major headwinds that the new global economy faces: poor demographic trends:

chart1ioAug2010 DEEP DEMOGRAPHIC DOO DOO

“The danger today, as opposed to prior deleveraging cycles, is that the deleveraging is being attempted into the headwinds of a structural demographic downwave as opposed to a decade of substantial population growth. Japan is the modern-day example of what deleveraging in the face of a slowing and now negatively growing population can do. Prior deleveraging periods such as what the U.S. and European economies experienced in the 1930s exhibited a similar demographic with the lowest levels of fertility in the 20th century and extremely low population growth. Things did not go well then. Today’s developed economies almost assuredly offer substantially less population growth than the 1.5% rate experienced over the prior 50 years. Even when viewed from a total global economy perspective, population growth over the next 10–20 years will barely exceed 1%.

The preceding analysis does not even begin to discuss the aging of this slower-growing population base itself. Japan, Germany, Italy and of course the United States, with its boomers moving toward their 60s, are getting older year after year. Even China with their previous one baby policy faces a similar demographic. And while older people spend a larger percentage of their income – that is, they save less and eventually dissave – the fact is that they spend far fewer dollars per capita than their younger counterparts. No new homes, fewer vacations, less emphasis on conspicuous consumption and no new cars every few years. Healthcare is their primary concern. These aging trends present a one-two negative punch to our New Normal thesis over the next 5–10 years: fewer new consumers in terms of total population, and a growing number of older ones who don’t spend as much money. The combined effect will slow economic growth more than otherwise.”

Read the full piece at PIMCO

Subscribe
Notify of
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments

Stay Connected

157,583FansLike
396,312FollowersFollow
2,280SubscribersSubscribe

Latest Articles

0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x