Posts Tagged ‘Arnold Schwarzenegger’

Schwarzenegger on Public Pensions and the Cost of the “Protected Class”

Schwarzenegger on Public Pensions and the Cost of the "Protected Class"

Courtesy of Mish

44014, LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - Thursday August 26, 2010. Arnold Schwarzenegger, the 38th Governor of California, is spotted walking back to his convertible after having breakfast at Le Pain Quotidien in Brentwood. Arnold, who could be seen snacking on a treat, wore a white button up, blue trousers, a silver wallet chain and a large wrist watch. Photograph: Pedro Andrade/Kevin Perkins,  PacificCoastNews.com   + 1

Now that Schwarzenegger is a certifiable lame duck (dead duck may be a more appropriate term) Schwarzenegger sees fit to take on public unions in a major way. It’s too late now (for him) even as he speaks the truth.

Please consider Public Pensions and Our Fiscal Future by Arnold Schwarzenegger.

Recently some critics have accused me of bullying state employees. Headlines in California papers this month have been screaming "Gov assails state workers" and "Schwarzenegger threatens state workers."

I’m doing no such thing. State employees are hard-working and valuable contributors to our society. But here’s the plain truth: California simply cannot solve its budgetary problems without addressing government-employee compensation and benefits.

Thanks to huge unfunded pension and retirement health-care promises granted by past governments, and also to deceptive pension-fund accounting that understated liabilities and overstated future investment returns, California is now saddled with $550 billion of retirement debt.

The cost of servicing that debt has grown at a rate of more than 15% annually over the last decade. This year, retirement benefits—more than $6 billion—will exceed what the state is spending on higher education. Next year, retirement costs will rise another 15%. In fact, they are destined to grow so much faster than state revenues that they threaten to suck up the money for every other program in the state budget.

At the same time that government-employee costs have been climbing, the private-sector workers whose taxes pay for them have been hurting. Since 2007, one million private jobs have been lost in California. Median incomes of workers in the state’s private sector have stagnated for more than a decade. To make matters worse, the retirement accounts of those workers in California have declined. The average 401(k) is down nationally nearly 20% since 2007. Meanwhile, the defined benefit retirement plans of government employees—for which private-sector workers are on the hook—have risen in value.

Few Californians in the private sector have $1 million in savings, but that’s effectively the retirement account they guarantee to public employees who opt to retire at age 55 and are entitled to a monthly, inflation-protected check of $3,000 for the rest of their lives.

In 2003, just before I became governor, the state assembly even passed a law permitting government employees to purchase additional taxpayer-guaranteed, high-yielding


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California Declares State Of Emergency Over State Finances, Or Arnie Is An Austrian After All (For The Wonks)

California Declares State Of Emergency Over State Finances, Or Arnie Is An Austrian After All (For The Wonks)

Total RecallCourtesy of Tyler Durden

Quite possibly this has something to do with the fact that Arnie just had a very vivid Total Recall from the future in which California had filed Chapter 66 (a brand new invention in honor of the famous route), mere months after he had decided to institute the latest round of furloughs and once again paying using IOUs.

From Reuters:

Increasing pressure on lawmakers to negotiate a state budget that closes a $19 billion shortfall, California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger declared a state of emergency over the state’s finances on Wednesday.

In the declaration, Schwarzenegger ordered three furlough days per month beginning in August for thousands of state employees to preserve the state’s cash to pay the state’s debt obligations and for essential services.

California’s budget is several weeks overdue and Schwarzenegger and top lawmakers are at impasse over how to balance the state’s books. Analysts say it could be several more weeks before the Republican governor and leaders of the Democrat-led legislature reach an agreement, a delay that may threaten to lower the state’s already weak credit rating, now hovering just a few notches above "junk" status.


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California Showdown – Court sides with Schwarzenegger on minimum wage; L.A. council Fires 232 Workers; Illinois Stops Paying Bills Keeps Digging Holes

California Showdown – Court sides with Schwarzenegger on minimum wage; L.A. council Fires 232 Workers; Illinois Stops Paying Bills Keeps Digging Holes

Courtesy of Mish

Arnold Schwarzenegger as an unstoppable killing machine in the science fiction thriller Terminator 1984.

Fortunately a California appellate court came down in favor of sanity and sided with the governor when Schwarzenegger Ordered 200,000 State Workers be Paid Minimum Wage until a budget was passed.

Please consider Court sides with Schwarzenegger on minimum wage

A state appellate court on Friday sided with the Schwarzenegger administration in its attempt to temporarily impose the federal minimum wage on tens of thousands of state workers.

It was not immediately clear how the ruling would affect Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger’s order a day earlier to pay 200,000 state workers the federal minimum of $7.25 an hour as the state wrestles with a budget crisis.

The state controller, who cuts state paychecks, has refused to comply with the order. Friday’s ruling affirms a lower-court decision in favor of the administration in a lawsuit filed two years ago after the governor’s first attempt to impose the minimum wage.

The latest ruling from the California 3rd District Court of Appeal in Sacramento concludes that state Controller John Chiang cannot ignore the minimum wage order from the state Department of Personnel Administration.

But Chiang said in a news release that he interpreted the court ruling to mean that his office would not have to comply with the executive order if it was practically infeasible to do so.

Schwarzenegger’s minimum wage order will not affect all of California’s 250,000 government employees. The 37,000 state workers represented by unions that recently negotiated new contracts with the administration will continue to receive their full pay. The contracts, including one with California Highway Patrol officers, contain pay cuts and pension reforms.

Salaried managers who are not paid on an hourly basis would see their pay cut to $455 a week. Doctors and lawyers who work for the state will not be paid at all until a budget is signed because minimum wage laws do not apply to those professions.

Schwarzenegger is pushing for minimum wage based on a 2003 California Supreme Court ruling. In White vs. Davis, the court held that state employees do not have the right to their full salaries if a state budget has not been enacted. At the same time, the state cannot ignore federal wage laws.

Chiang has maintained that


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California OKs Taxinator Plan to Pay State Employees Minimum Wage

California OKs Taxinator Plan to Pay State Employees Minimum Wage

Courtesy of Jr. Deputy Accountant 

The state has until the end of the month to come up with a budget plan or will be forced to pay thousands of state employees minimum wage ($7.25) until it does. While some might argue our state employees could have used a pay cut quite some time ago and may be partially to blame for our budget troubles, I’m not sure this is the way to go about fixing our broken budget. If and when Sacramento does figure out a budget, state employees will be due back pay. For now, however, it’s looking like a rough summer for some.

LA Times:

A state appeals court ruled Friday that Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger can reduce state workers’ pay to the federal minimum wage when the state budget is late.

The ruling comes a day after the governor ordered the pay of nearly 200,000 state employees to be reduced to $7.25 an hour until a budget is passed, but State Controller John Chiang, who issues the paychecks, has said he would not obey the order.

The ruling by the 3rd District Court of Appeals centers on a 2008 case, when during a similar budget impasse Schwarzenegger ordered state workers’ be paid the federal minimum wage.

John Chiang obviously doesn’t want his house burned down but Schwarzenegger could care less, before long he won’t have to worry about any of this crap and will be getting fat on the ranch far far away from Sacramento and all the drama that comes with. 

 


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Schwarzenegger’s Budget Addresses Few Structural Issues

Schwarzenegger’s Budget Addresses Few Structural Issues

California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger proposes his $83.4 billion state budget plan in Sacramento.

Courtesy of Mish 

Tonight, with much fanfare, Schwarzenegger released his proposal to fix California’s $19 billion budget deficit. It was a huge disappointment.

Schwarzenegger had a golden opportunity to propose radical changes like privatizing the prison system, privatizing work in general, sending illegal aliens home, or getting rid of defined benefit plans. Instead, Schwarzenegger wimped out on many key issues.

Budget at a Glance

Please consider some highlights from Schwarzenegger’s revised state budget at a glance

Close the $19.1 Billion Deficit Through:

  • $12.4 billion in spending cuts.
  • $3.4 billion in federal money.
  • $3.3 billion in other measures, primarily through borrowing from other state funds.

Spending Cuts Breakdown

  • $1.1 billion through the elimination of CalWORKS, the state’s primary welfare program, which serves 1.4 million people, two-thirds of them children.
  • $750 million in unspecified cuts to the state’s in-home supportive services program for the disabled, achieved through reductions in wages and services.
  • Cuts $532 million from Medi-Cal, the state’s medical program for the poor, by reducing eligibility, limiting doctor’s visits to 10 per year, reducing funding for hearing aids and other medical equipment, and increasing copays.
  • $811 million reduction in prison health care expenses by making the system more efficient and reducing funding.
  • About $360 million in savings by shifting nonviolent offenders out of state prisons and into county jails and by reducing the juvenile prison population and closing the facilities that house them.

State Employees

  • Payroll reductions of 5 percent across all state departments, except for constitutional offices, which already achieved 5 percent reductions. The administration says much of the payroll reduction can be achieved by departments not filling current vacancies.
  • A 5 percent pay cut for all state workers and a 5 percent increase in their pension contributions. The administration says this will save $1.6 billion.

Media Reporting

As soon as Schwarzenegger released the budget, the media was all over it. The LA Times headline says it all: Schwarzenegger’s budget deals blows to the poor.

Proposing a budget that would eliminate the state’s welfare-to-work program and most child care for the poor, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger on Friday outlined a stark vision of a California that would sharply limit aid to some of its poorest and neediest citizens.

His $83.4-billion plan would also freeze funding for local schools, further cut state


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Schwarzenegger: “Terrible Cuts” Needed to Close Deficit

Schwarzenegger: "Terrible Cuts" Needed to Close Deficit; Prison System Insanity; Mish Proposals for California

Courtesy of Mish

Floyd Mayweather Jr. v Shane Mosley

Now that growth in California’s tax revenue is widely understood to be a mirage, with April wiping out all the gains in the previous 4 months, Schwarzenegger Preps ‘Terrible Cuts’ to Close Deficit.

California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger will seek “terrible cuts” to eliminate an $18.6 billion budget deficit facing the most-populous U.S. state through June 2011, his spokesman said.

“We can’t get through this deficit without very terrible cuts,” Schwarzenegger spokesman Aaron McLear told reporters in Sacramento. “We don’t believe that raising taxes right now is the right thing to do.”

Schwarzenegger’s newest plan will revise the proposals introduced in January to account for the tax-collection shortages. In January, the governor said California may have to eliminate entire welfare programs, including the main one that provides cash and job assistance to families below the poverty line, without an influx of cash from the federal government.

Since then, the Democrat-controlled Legislature has made few strides toward closing the budget hole. Legislation adopted during the emergency session ordered by Schwarzenegger knocked about $1.4 billion from the deficit.

Democrats this week introduced a package of bills that would raise as much as $2.9 billion annually by imposing a 10 percent severance tax on oil production in the state, repealing corporate-tax breaks approved last year to spur job growth and assessing commercial property taxes differently.

By the beginning of 2010, Schwarzenegger and the lawmakers had closed a $60 billion deficit partly by slashing spending on schools, temporarily raising taxes and borrowing from local governments.

Prison System Insanity

Prisoner with ball and chain

I do not care for the Greece comparison, but some of the slides in 16 Reasons Why California Is The Next Greece are quite telling.

Slide #7: In 23 years, California erected 23 prisons and ONLY ONE university
"In a recent 23-year period, California erected 23 prisons — one a year, each costing roughly $100 million dollars annually to operate, with both Democratic and Republican governors occupying the statehouse — at the same time that it added just one campus to its vaunted university system, UC Merced."

Slide #9: CA spends $859 million per year on imprisoned illegal immigrants
"There are roughly 19,000 illegal immigrants in state prisons, representing 11% of all inmates. That’s costing $970 million during


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California Budget Resolution puts Band-Aid on Failing Dike

California Budget Resolution puts Band-Aid on Failing Dike

Courtesy of Mish

After months of political wrangling between Democrats, Republicans, and the governor, California Approves Budget, Sends Bills to Governor.

California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger said he supports the plan the Legislature approved today to erase a $26 billion deficit that pushed the most-populous U.S. state to the brink of insolvency.

The Senate and Assembly passed the package of more than two-dozen bills though a marathon 18-hour session. Schwarzenegger told reporters afterwards that he will sign the budget reduction plan within days after using his line-item veto authority to trim spending and bolster state reserves.

The package cuts spending by $15 billion, including $6 billion from schools and community colleges, $3 billion from universities and $1.2 billion from prisons. It also raises $4 billion, in part by accelerating personal and corporate income- tax withholding and increasing the amount withheld by 10 percent.

The passage will allow the state to use $2 billion of local property taxes meant for cities and other local jurisdictions and some $1.7 billion earmarked for redevelopment agencies.

The deficit plan also shifts $1.5 billion between accounts and moves the last payday for workers this fiscal year to the next 12-month period.

Hollingsworth, the Republican leader, said he hopes that lawmakers don’t have to redraw the budget yet again should the state’s revenue keep falling.

Budget Incorporates Fiscally Unsound, Possibly Illegal Budget Gimmicks

For starters, the much ballyhooed budged is not even balanced. Borrowing money from local governments is fiscally unsound and possibly illegal.

Please consider California Cities Knock State Budget, Wary of Bonds.

California local governments criticized the budget deal struck last night and expressed doubts about plans to tap $2 billion of their property taxes to close the $26 billion state deficit.

McKenzie and Paul McIntosh, the executive director of the California State Association of Counties, said localities may file a lawsuit challenging the use of their gasoline tax and redevelopment funds, which they said violates the state constitution.

“They don’t want to cut spending and they don’t want to raise taxes,” said McKenzie. “They find it’s easier to steal the money.”

The Los Angeles County supervisors voted unanimously today to sue the state if $400 million of funds it expected are withheld, the Associated Press reported.

Numerous Unsolved Structural Defects

California has numerous unsolved structural


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California impasse ends as Schwarzenegger reaches agreement

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California impasse ends as Schwarzenegger reaches agreement

Arnold Schwarzenegger, CaliforniaCourtesy of Edward Harrison at Credit Writedowns

This came in overnight via the FT.  Most of the shortfall in revenue is made up through spending cuts.  Below are the relevant paragraphs:

The agreement involves cutting nearly $6bn from schools and community colleges and close to $3bn from the state’s university system, although Mr Schwarzenegger said education cuts would be fully “refunded”.

An additional $1.3bn will be cut from Medi-Cal, the health programme for low earners and the poor.

CalWorks, the state’s welfare-to-work programme – and the target of much criticism from Mr Schwarzenegger – will have its funding cut by $528m, while Healthy Families, a programme that provides health insurance for 930,000 low-income children, will be cut by $124m.

The state’s in-home support services programme for the frail and disabled will also have its funding slashed. Mr Schwarzenegger has maintained that the system is a hot-bed of fraud abuses and won approval to begin fingerprinting care-givers and recipients of aid.

Another contentious part of the agreement will clear the way for oil drilling to resume off the coast of Santa Barbara. The prospect of drilling in the area has attracted a lot of criticism and is likely to be fiercely contested by local residents and environmental campaigners.

I should also mention some thoughts from Tim Fernholz via Brad DeLong on why the Federal Government has not given states more money.  He claims it was moderate Senators in Congress who explicitly took out state aid from the February stimulus package.  He writes:

Robert Samuelson, typically known for butchering economics in his column, takes a break today in order to butcher political science. He says the stimulus isn’t working because it is composed of the wrong programs, and he blames President Obama specifically for not including things like fiscal aid to states…. But if Samuelson were to remember what actually happened last February, or even do some superficial research, he’d realize that it was the moderate members of the Senate, led by Sens. Ben Nelson and Susan Collins, who stripped out much of the state funding…. [T]hese senators never did get around to telling anyone the economic logic of their proposal…. So Samuelson will never criticize moderate


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California Politicians Making Progress but “Biggest and Hardest Decisions Remain”

California Politicians Making Progress but "Biggest and Hardest Decisions Remain"

California Governor Arnold SchwarzeneggerCourtesy of Mish

There is still no breakthrough as California Politicians Negotiate to Close Deficit.

California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger and legislative leaders negotiated through the weekend, making progress while reporting no breakthrough in solving the state’s $26 billion budget deficit that’s left the most-populous U.S. state issuing IOUs to its creditors.

The meetings, held July 11 and yesterday in Schwarzenegger’s Sacramento office, failed to produce a consensus on how to slash government spending to compensate for a drop in revenue brought on by the faltering economy. Democratic legislative leaders said they were optimistic after talks broke down last week.

“We have several more days to go,” Democratic Assembly leader Karen Bass told reporters during a break in the meetings yesterday. “What I think is most important is that talks have not broken down.”

California this month began issuing IOUs to pay some of its bills, a step taken only one other time since the Great Depression, because of political stalemate over a gap in the $100 billion annual budget.

Schwarzenegger, a Republican, has repeatedly said he won’t endorse another round of tax increases. Instead, he’s proposed deep cuts to spending on schools, health insurance programs and welfare, and sought to link the passage of the budget to measures he says would crack down on fraudulent claims for state aid. Democrats have bristled at the scale of the cuts, saying they would deal a blow to residents already reeling from the economic recession.

decisionsAssembly Republican leader Sam Blakeslee, who represents San Luis Obispo, said the negotiations have yet to deliver agreement on the magnitude of cuts needed.

Nor have they dealt with Schwarzenegger’s proposal to suspend a voter-approved law that guarantees minimum funding levels for public schools, he said. That suggestion has drawn fire from the California Teachers Association, which represents more than 340,000 school employees.

“It’s premature to declare victory,” Blakeslee told reporters. “The biggest and hardest decisions are before us.”

Unless and until California addresses the problems of bloated unneeded programs, union pay scales, and particularly the issues of pensions and benefits, the legislature will have solved nothing. Now is the chance to address those issues but the safe bet is that legislators will once again snatch defeat from the jaws of victory by postponing hard decisions on the real issues.

Mike "Mish" Shedlock
 


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After California: Which States Are in the Most Peril?

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After California: Which States Are in the Most Peril?

Courtesy of TIME, written by Barbara Kiviat

Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger California is the poster child for dysfunctional state finance. A week past the legal deadline for passing a budget, the state has yet to close a $26 billion hole. State workers are — yet again — being told to stay home. The National Park Service is threatening to take back parks it gave to California should the state try to save money by closing them. Taxpayers are getting IOUs in the mail instead of refund checks since there’s no cash to pay them what they’re owed. You can now buy the IOUs on eBay.

California’s crazy budget laws make it an extreme case, but that doesn’t mean it’s alone in financial duress — there are plenty of other states in serious hot water. (See how Americans are spending now.)

All but a handful of states with fiscal years ending on June 30 have taken wrenching steps needed to pass new budgets: mainly, a raft of tax hikes and service cuts. Vermont is shutting down highway rest stops and decimating its Agency of Natural Resources. In Washington, 40,000 people are losing their state-subsidized health care, and public-college tuition could be going up as much as 14%. New Jersey is hiking taxes on high-income earners, cigarette smokers (an extra 12.5 cents a pack) and drinkers (a 25% increase on wine and liquor).

And there could be plenty more pain ahead. Revenues — from income, sales and property taxes — continue to fall. True, states have already plowed through a lot of tough decisions to close the $102 billion shortfall they collectively faced during the last budget cycle. But already it looks like this year’s gap will be $121 billion, according to a report from the National Conference of State Legislatures.

Two of the worst-off states by that count are Alaska and Nevada. Each of them will need to spend 30% more than what state tax officers think they’ll be collecting. And neither has a state income tax, relying on oil and tourism taxes, respectively, for most of their revenues.

Steven Gottlieb / GettyIn other states, however, it’s the extra volatility that comes from dependence on personal-income tax that is exacerbating the problem. Research by economists at the Chicago Fed…
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Phil's Favorites

Bloomberg Has Built a Star Wars Machine to Try to Steal the Democratic Nomination

Courtesy of Pam Martens

Michael Bloomberg

Billionaire Michael Bloomberg is used to getting his way. After serving two terms as New York City’s Mayor as a Republican, he used his own vast stash of cash to repeal term limits and give himself another four-year term, running as an Independent. Now he has promised to do the unprecedented: spend $1 billion of his own money to install himself as President of the United States, running on the Democratic ticket.

Bloomberg’s campaign increasingly resembles an octopus with money gushing out of its tentacles into anything and everything that will inject Mic...



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Zero Hedge

China Stocks Surge, S&P Futs Hit All Time High On Latest Chinese Monetary Stimulus

Courtesy of ZeroHedge View original post here.

European stocks rose on Monday, Chinese shares surged, recovering all their post-coronavirus losses and S&P and Nasdaq futures jumped to new all time highs as investors took encouragement from the Asian country’s monetary (if not fiscal) pledges to support the world’s second-biggest economy in the face of the coronavirus outbreak. The yen and gold both slipped.

...



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Insider Scoop

AMX Buys Fellow Alabama Company Powell, Adds Reefer Capacity

Courtesy of Benzinga

Alabama Motor Express will push deeper into the refrigerated business with purchase of Powell Transport Solutions.

The acquisition, announced earlier this week, will bring 35 refrigerated trailers to AMX, the company said in a statement. A spokeswoman for AMX, in response to questions submitted by FreightWaves, said the company's business is currently about 10% refrigerated. The AMX fleet before the acquisition was 210 trailers, she said.

Powell's business is 100% refrigerated, according to the...



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Biotech & Health

Coronavirus: the blow to the Chinese economy could be felt for years

 

Coronavirus: the blow to the Chinese economy could be felt for years

Courtesy of Chusu He, Coventry University

Investors are still being fairly complacent about the novel coronavirus. After the number of new daily cases suddenly shot up to more than 15,000 on February 12 following more than a week of decline, there were some jitters in the markets. With Chinese authorities saying the increase was due to a decision to broaden the definition for diagnosing people, there were falls in the region of 1% in European markets, and smaller retrenchments in Asia and North America.

It is...



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Members' Corner

How to Stop Bill Barr

 

How to Stop Bill Barr

We must remove this cancer on our democracy.

Courtesy of Greg Olear, at PREVAIL, author of Dirty Rubles: An Introduction to Trump/Russia

...



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The Technical Traders

Is The Technology Sector Setting Up For A Crash? Part I

Courtesy of Technical Traders

One thing that continues to amaze our research team is the total scale and scope of the Capital Shift which is taking place across the globe.  For almost 5+ years, foreign investors have been piling into the US stock market chasing the stronger US dollar and continued advancement of US share prices. It is almost like there is no other place on the planet that will allow investors to pool capital into such a variety of strong assets while protecting against foreign capital risks.  Yet the one big question remains – when will a price reversion event hit the US stock
market?

So many researchers, even our team of researchers, believe we have found the keys to unloc...



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Kimble Charting Solutions

Joe Friday Says Germany (DAX) Could Rally 30%, Happy Valentines Day For The Bulls!

Courtesy of Chris Kimble

German DAX Index “weekly” Chart

The German DAX is one of the more important global stock market indices, as it represents the largest economy / market in the Euro Zone.

So it would be a real treat for the bulls to see this stock market index breakout as we celebrate Valentine’s Day.

The facts, Ma’am. Just the facts; The German DAX looks to have formed a bullish ascending triangle over the past 3 years and it is currently attempting to breakout above the top at (1)....



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ValueWalk

Russell 2000 Index (RUT) hits an almost one-month high

By Gorilla Trades. Originally published at ValueWalk.

Ad the Russell 2000 Index (INDEXRUSSELL: RUT) hit an almost one-month high today, commenting on today’s trading Gorilla Trades strategist Ken Berman said:

Q4 2019 hedge fund letters, conferences and more

Russell 2000 Index (INDEXRUSSELL: RUT) Outperforms Large-Cap Benchmarks

While the overnight session was nothing short of scary stocks held on to most of yesterday's gains and small-caps even extended their winning streak. The Russell 2000 Index (INDEXRUSSELL: RUT) hit an almost one-month high today, finishing higher for the fourth day in a row while outperforming the large-cap benchmarks, and since the Volatility...



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Chart School

Dow theory warning from the Utilities Index

Courtesy of Read the Ticker

Charles Dow died in 1902, and the investors should thank him for his ever lasting Dow Theory Analysis.

Carrying on this blog theme looking at the Utility stocks. Previous post.
Dow Jones Utility index could trade like the FANGs
Formula for when the Great Stock Market Rally ends



You can learn about Dow Theory here

This post is concerned wi...

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Digital Currencies

Bitcoin Price May Hit $27K All-Time High By Summer, Predicts Fundstrat's Tom Lee

Courtesy of ZeroHedge View original post here.

Authored by William Suberg via CoinTelegraph.com,

Bitcoin is primed for average gains of almost 200% over the next six months, one of its best-known supporters has told mainstream media. 

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Lee's Free Thinking

Why Blaming the Repo Market is Like Blaming the Australian Bush Fires

 

Why Blaming the Repo Market is Like Blaming the Australian Bush Fires

Courtesy of  

The repo market problem isn’t the problem. It’s a sideshow, a diversion, and a joke. It’s a symptom of the problem.

Today, I got a note from Liquidity Trader subscriber David, a professional investor, and it got me to thinking. Here’s what David wrote:

Lee,

The ‘experts’ I hear from keep saying that once 300B more in reserves have ...



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Mapping The Market

How IPOs Are Priced

Via Jean Luc 

Funny but probably true:

...

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Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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