Posts Tagged ‘saving’

The Money Market Piggybank is Shattered

The Money Market Piggybank is Shattered

Courtesy of Joshua M Brown, The Reformed Broker 

USA Today is out with a mystery that I will help them out with…

They ask the question "Where did the $1.1 trillion that just came out of ultra low-yielding money market funds just go?"

Then they go on to point out that the average bank account’s interest rate is .75% versus the ridiculous .04% that traditional money market funds are paying, so maybe some of the $1.1 trillion went there.

Then we are treated to the usual stats about "how much gosh darn cash has been sucked into bond mutual funds" – $700 billion in the last 18 months says TrimTabs.  The growth of assets in bond funds cannot explain the money market sapping alone, because we all know that a lot of those inflows are coming from stock people that are scared and asset allocators that are hopping aboard the bond bandwagon (bondwagon?).  It’s the disillusioned stock market money that’s pumping into bond funds more than anything else.

The article also posits that investors may be skipping the money market funds and going straight for money market instruments, like buying treasuries directly.  I’m not seeing much of that at the retail level at all.

So where did a trillion dollars just go when it left the universe of over 1600 money market funds?

Easy.  Some of it may have gone to bond funds, but my bet is that an inordinate amount went toward everyday Americans paying their everyday bills.  That’s right, I believe that the investor class is finally starting to pay regular expenses and cover the bills with their money market funds, turning that New Normal maxim about the coming of higher savings rates on its ear.

I don’t have statistical confirmation of this hunch just yet (and I’m actually not sure where to get it), but this is what I’m beginning to see firsthand.  Brokerage and investment accounts are becoming a piggybank for investors who are nowhere near retirement.

They will not be buying-and-holding as the commercials have programmed them to do while their businesses and household balance sheets are on their last legs.  They will put the capital that’s been earmarked for "investment" to much better use than a $40 annual return on $10,000 in a money market fund.

With underemployment still raging and business…
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , ,




Anemic Retail Sales; Strength of Consumer Recovery Overstated

Anemic Retail Sales; Strength of Consumer Recovery Overstated

Courtesy of Mish 

Economists never expect bad news. Once again they were surprised by weak economic reports, this time by poor retail sales. Bloomberg reports Retail Sales in U.S. Fall as Consumers Boost Savings

Sales at U.S. retailers unexpectedly dropped in May, signaling consumers boosted savings as employment slowed and stocks fell.

Purchases decreased 1.2 percent, the biggest drop since September 2009, following a 0.6 percent April gain that was larger than previously estimated, Commerce Department figures showed today in Washington. Demand plunged at building-material stores, reflecting the end of a government appliance rebate, and sales fell at auto dealers, in contrast to industry figures which showed a gain.

Companies reined in hiring last month, making it likely households will keep a lid on spending, which accounts for about 70 percent of the economy. Discounters Target Corp. and TJX Cos. were among merchants reporting gains in May sales, indicating households are looking for bargains to stretch out their paychecks.

“The strength of the consumer recovery was overstated,” said David Sloan, a senior economist at 4Cast Inc. whose forecast of a 0.7 percent decline was the lowest among economists surveyed. “I don’t think things are going into a nosedive. The economy is in recovery. The outlook is still moderately positive.”

Retail sales were projected to increase 0.2 percent, according to the median estimate of 76 economists in a Bloomberg survey. Forecasts ranged from a decline of 0.7 percent to a gain of 1 percent.

The decrease in demand wasn’t broad-based, with five of 13 major categories showing decreases last month, led by a 9.3 percent plunge at building-material stores.

The decrease at building-material stores followed an 8.4 percent jump in April and a gain in March that may have reflected a surge in appliance sales propelled by a provision of the government’s stimulus package last year that provided rebates for purchases of more energy-efficient products.

Purchases of automobiles dropped 1.7 percent last month, counter to industry figures. General Motors Co. and Ford Motor Co. posted U.S. sales increases in May that topped analysts’ estimates as higher consumer confidence and inexpensive gasoline spurred customers to buy more sport utility vehicles.

“We’re ramping up production to meet continued strong demand for all of our launch vehicles as well as other products,” Stephen Carlisle, vice president for U.S. sales at GM, said


continue reading


Tags: , , , , , ,




There’s a Slow Train Coming

There’s a Slow Train Coming

Courtesy of John Mauldin, Thoughts from the Frontline Weekly Newsletter

Transparent clock and moving train (digital)

There’s a Slow Train Coming
A Negative 2% GDP in the Third Quarter?
Small Business Still Has Issues
Italy, Paris, Vancouver, and San Francisco
And a Forbes Cruise to Mexico

Sometimes I feel so low-down and disgusted
Can’t help but wonder what’s happenin’ to my companions,
Are they lost or are they found, have they counted the cost it’ll take to bring down
All their earthly principles they’re gonna have to abandon?
There’s a slow, slow train comin’ up around the bend.

- Bob Dylan

The question before the jury is a simple one, but the answer is complex. Is the US in a "V"-shaped recovery? Are we returning to the old normal? A great deal hinges on the answer, and this week we look at some of the evidence before us.

But first, a follow-up thought to last week’s letter. I wrote about why countries can reduce their private debt, reduce their public debt, or run a trade deficit, but not all three at the same time. If a country wants to see its government run a fiscal surplus (or small deficit) and at the same time its private citizens want to reduce their leverage (common desires throughout the developed world), it must run a trade surplus. That’s a simple accounting statement. If you did not read last week’s letter, you can get to it by going here.

That brings up the deepwater gusher in the Gulf. That it is an unmitigated disaster is an understatement. There is the possibility of the oil getting into the Gulf Stream and going around Florida and landing upon the Atlantic coast. We will be cleaning this up for years.

I am at the moment on a plane to Italy, but if memory serves me right, we run about a $300-billion-dollar trade deficit just in energy purchases. Our trade deficit has been coming down in most other categories but is fairly steady with respect to oil. And as noted above, if we want to get to a place where we are in control of our government deficit, we must reduce that trade deficit.

Oil can and graph with American dollar

Bluntly, we cannot hope…
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , , ,




May Jobs Report Is ‘Disappointing’

Courtesy of Econophile

From The Daily Capitalist

President Obama has now become a professional economist, because like most professional economists his unemployment forecast was wrong.

While the headline from the Wall Street Journal this morning was "Census Hiring Bolsters U.S. Payrolls," nothing could be farther from the truth. Private sector job growth in May was anemic, coming in at only 41,000. The total number of new jobs was 431,000, but temporary Census Bureau hiring accounted for 411,000 of those jobs. Note that the difference between the two numbers doesn’t add up because net government employment was less than that because state and local governments shed jobs. [I now see that the latest online edition of the Journal has re-entitled their story, "US Private Sector Added Few Jobs In May."]

The consensus among economists surveyed by the Journal and Bloomberg expected 515,000 and 536,000, respectively.

“Job growth is going to be anemic,” said Bill Gross, who runs the world’s biggest bond fund at Pacific Investment Management Co. in Newport Beach, California.

“Remember, it requires 150,000 to 200,000 jobs in order to reduce that unemployment rate, which is a key focus for the administration,” he said in an interview with Bloomberg Radio’s Tom Keene on “Bloomberg on the Economy.”

These numbers are disappointing considering that April showed modest private employment growth of 218,000 jobs in April and 230,000 jobs in March. Overall the unemployment rate dropped from 9.9% to 9.7%. The broader "U-6" index dropped to 16.6% from 17.1%. This is not what was expected. It is discouraging to see the Employment-population ratio decline YoY from 59.6  to 58.7 (May 2009 to May 2010).

The U-6 report is interesting in that while it fell, it is likely that the fall was a result of people dropping out of the labor force because they can’t find employment. The civilian labor force participation rate decreased by 0.2% to 65.0%. About 6.8 million people have been out of a job for more than 27 weeks, or 46% of the unemployed. This has to be considered in light of population increases: while the population grew 170,000, 322,000 dropped out of the labor force.

Some of the BLS report highlights: manufacturing +29,000, temps +31,000, mining +10,000, health care +8,000, construction -35,000. These numbers well under the levels seen for…
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , ,




 
 
 

ValueWalk

Another Promising Rebound

By Anna Peel. Originally published at ValueWalk.

We’re seeing a strong start to trading on Wednesday after what has been a very turbulent start to the week.

Q4 2021 hedge fund letters, conferences and more

We've seen some sharp sell-offs already this week but investors appear to be encouraged by just how quickly and strong markets have bounced back. Monday looked like it was going to be a bloodbath in equity markets but rather than panic, investors poured back in and seized upon the lower valuati...



more from ValueWalk

Zero Hedge

Nomura: Here Comes 'The Big One'

Courtesy of ZeroHedge View original post here.

Authored by Charlie McElligott, Managing Director of Cross-Asset Strategy at Nomura,

“Pre-FOMC drift” - but this time, thanks to a massive “kick-save” from Microsoft guidance which turned the entirety of global risk-assets from cratering lower in the after-hours trade last night to now, spasming higher into Fed later today (NQ +4.4% low to high) and with still substantial “short Gamma vs spot” out there for Dealer hedging purposes, as well as sharply “netted-down” exposure from Fundemental investors and outright “shorts” in CTA Trend….while conversely, we currently see a quiet R...



more from Tyler

Phil's Favorites

Indiscriminate selling

 

Indiscriminate selling

Courtesy of 

There are a few green stocks in the market today, and by “a few”, I mean you can count them on two hands and still have a few fingers left over. To gag yourself with. Those green stocks are things like Kohl’s (a special situation takeover story) and then it’s like grocery stores and shoe cobblers. That’s really it. Tesla is being absolutely mangled, which tells you which type of mutual funds and ETFs are being redeemed (liquidated?) today.

I have some buy limit orders in at completely out...



more from Ilene

Biotech/COVID-19

How mRNA and DNA vaccines could soon treat cancers, HIV, autoimmune disorders and genetic diseases

 

How mRNA and DNA vaccines could soon treat cancers, HIV, autoimmune disorders and genetic diseases

Nucleic acid vaccines use mRNA to give cells instructions on how to produce a desired protein. Libre de Droit/iStock via Getty Images

Courtesy of Deborah Fuller, University of Washington

The two most successful coronavirus vaccines developed in the U.S. – the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines – are both mRNA vaccines. The idea of using genetic material to produce an immune response has opened up a world of research ...



more from Biotech/COVID-19

Politics

5 things to know about why Russia might invade Ukraine - and why the US is involved

 

5 things to know about why Russia might invade Ukraine – and why the US is involved

Courtesy of Tatsiana Kulakevich, University of South Florida

U.S. President Joe Biden said on Jan. 19, 2022, that he thinks Russia will invade Ukraine, and cautioned Russian president Vladimir Putin that he “will regret having done it,” following months of building tension.

Russia has amassed an estimated 100,000 troops along its border with Ukraine over the past several months.

In mid-January, Russia began moving ...



more from Politics

Kimble Charting Solutions

Nasdaq Erases 7 months of Gains With Sharp Decline! Just Getting Started???

Courtesy of Chris Kimble

The tech wreck has been fast and furious. And considering that the stock market correction is still relatively new, we really don’t know if it will end soon or carry on for weeks/months.

Today’s chart is “linear” and takes a long-term “monthly” view. As you can see, the Nasdaq Composite Index registered a bearish monthly reversal at the top of the channel at (1).

And in the first 21-days of the year, this broad index of technology stocks has wiped out the prior 7 months of gains!...



more from Kimble C.S.

Chart School

Bitcoin Swings Down to Support

Courtesy of Read the Ticker

Come on! Seriously do you think a 400% rally for Bitcoin was going to be given to the public easily. Without any pain! Come on muppets!



The uniformed (public) buy when price is rising or breaking new highs, the informed buy when price is falling or breaking lows.



The informed have to do it this way as they are large volume players and the only way they can buy large volume is to create chaos. The chaos brings to the market the weak holders and a forced sell. Price is moved to where the volume can be accumulated, in a bull trend that is down to critical support.



Of course if price is in a true bull market the 'chaos' created should not break critical long term trend signals, ...



more from Chart School

Digital Currencies

The metaverse is money and crypto is king - why you'll be on a blockchain when you're hopping

 

The metaverse is money and crypto is king – why you’ll be on a blockchain when you’re virtual-world hopping

In the metaverse, your avatar, the clothes it wears and the things it carries belong to you thanks to blockchain. Duncan Rawlinson - Duncan.co/Flickr, CC BY-NC

Courtesy of Rabindra Ratan, Michigan State University and Dar Meshi, Michigan State University ...



more from Bitcoin

Promotions

Phil's Interview on Options Trading with TD Bank

TD Bank's host Bryan Rogers interviewed Phil on June 10 as part of TD's Options Education Month. If you missed the program, be sure to watch the video below. It should be required viewing for anyone trading or thinking about trading using options. 

Watch here:

TD's webinar with Phil (link) or right here at PSW

Screenshots of TD's slides illustrating Phil's examples:

 

 

&n...



more from Promotions

Mapping The Market

Suez Canal: Critical Waterway Comes to a Halt

 

Suez Canal: Critical Waterway Comes to a Halt

Courtesy of Marcus Lu, Visual Capitalist

The Suez Canal: A Critical Waterway Comes to a Halt

On March 23, 2021, a massive ship named Ever Given became lodged in the Suez Canal, completely blocking traffic in both directions. According to the Suez Canal Authority, the 1,312 foot long (400 m) container ship ran aground during a sandstorm that caused low visibility, impacting the ship’s navigation. The vessel is owned by Taiwanese shipping firm, Evergreen Marine.

With over 2...



more from M.T.M.

The Technical Traders

Adaptive Fibonacci Price Modeling System Suggests Market Peak May Be Near

Courtesy of Technical Traders

Our Adaptive Fibonacci Price Modeling system is suggesting a moderate price peak may be already setting up in the NASDAQ while the Dow Jones, S&P500, and Transportation Index continue to rally beyond the projected Fibonacci Price Expansion Levels.  This indicates that capital may be shifting away from the already lofty Technology sector and into Basic Materials, Financials, Energy, Consumer Staples, Utilities, as well as other sectors.

This type of a structural market shift indicates a move away from speculation and towards Blue Chip returns. It suggests traders and investors are expecting the US consumer to come back strong (or at least hold up the market at...



more from Tech. Traders

Lee's Free Thinking

Texas, Florida, Arizona, Georgia - The Branch COVIDIANS Are Still Burning Down the House

 

Texas, Florida, Arizona, Georgia – The Branch COVIDIANS Are Still Burning Down the House

Courtesy of Lee Adler, WallStreetExaminer 

The numbers of new cases in some of the hardest hit COVID19 states have started to plateau, or even decline, over the past few days. A few pundits have noted it and concluded that it was a hopeful sign. 

Is it real or is something else going on? Like a restriction in the numbers of tests, or simply the inability to test enough, or are some people simply giving up on getting tested? Because as we all know from our dear leader, the less testing, the less...



more from Lee

Insider Scoop

Economic Data Scheduled For Friday

Courtesy of Benzinga

  • Data on nonfarm payrolls and unemployment rate for March will be released at 8:30 a.m. ET.
  • US Services Purchasing Managers' Index for March is scheduled for release at 9:45 a.m. ET.
  • The ISM's non-manufacturing index for March will be released at 10:00 a.m. ET.
  • The Baker Hughes North American rig count report for the latest week is scheduled for release at 1:00 p.m. ET.
...

http://www.insidercow.com/ more from Insider





About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

Learn more About Phil >>


As Seen On:




About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.