Guest View
User: Pass: | become a member
Phil's Newsletter

Thursday Flip Flop – Can Draghi Deliver the Goods?

Put up or shut up time.  

We had a very extensive discussion in this morning's Member Chat already, discussing the BOE, the ECB, China, Europe, AAPL vs. Samsung, China's draining of liquidity, etc. so forgive me if I'm not in the mood to cover that ground again.  

What I do find worthy of more discussion is this nice breakdown of the Russell by Bespoke, which highlights how tough things are becoming for small business in America.  Actually, these businesses aren't that small as they are public companies but compared to our top 1% Big Businesses – they are but dust in the wind.  

It's no secret that this country is now run for the sole benefit of the top 1% and the bottom 99% are nothing more than Matrix-like human cows – to be penned in and drained by the top 1% as they force them to work off a lifetime of debt that begins with the student loan they need before being "qualified" to get their first job and culminates in medical bills that wipe out whatever meager savings they were able to accumulate during their non-stop working lives (other than that 2-week vacation, of course!) and, of course, the massive bill for burying you when you die!  

When you are in the top 1%, $200,000 for college and $20,000 to have a baby and $200,000 deposits on $1M homes and $1,500 a month medical insurance are just bills that get paid, leaving plenty of money on the side to speculate in rising food and commodity prices so we are actually PLEASED when we go to the gas station and pay $4 a gallon and PLEASE when each bag of groceries costs $50 because – although we pay $60 a tank to fill up along with the rest of you – we ALSO invest in companies that charge 200M other American drivers $60 a tank and $200 for groceries and we GET part of the profits on that $52Bn a week that even the bottom of the bottom 99% must pay for food and groceries.  

We own the electricity and the cable companies and the gas companies and your phone company and, of course, the banks you pay those loans to.  The 1% doesn't struggle during hard times – we just raise our fees!

Like the fees we're going
continue reading





Which Way Wednesday – Waiting on the Fed, then the ECB

 

Waiting to cut out the deadwood.

Waiting to clean up the city.

Waiting to weed out the weaklings.

Waiting for the final solution

To strengthen the strain.

Waiting to follow the worms. – Pink Floyd 

 

Don't you just love the anticipation?  

As expected, we got a bit of a bump from Geithner's turn on Bloomberg last night but it was utter nonsense with Timmy pleading for policy makers in Europe and at home in the US to DO SOMETHING!!!   Timmy saying something needs to be done is a very, very far cry from something being done – a nuance that seems to be escaping the bulls as the thinly-traded US futures are up about 0.4% at 8am.  Europeans are not quite so gullible and their markets are off about 1%, following up on yesterday's awful close.  

Of course the MSM pep squad has all morning to quote Geithner out of context while we wait for the FOMC statement at 2:15 but Bernanke is not scheduled to speak after the statement is released and it would be extremely odd for them to make a major policy move via their statement with no press conference so I think it's all going to be on Draghi and the ECB tomorrow and they'd better be coming up with a Hell of a big bazooka if they want to make a dent in their problems.

You're welcome, by the way, if you went with yesterday's Futures picks from the main post.  Oil fell all the way to $87.50 before turning back up (and we went long into the close so YAY!) for a nice $2,500 per contract gain on /CL.  Gold dropped $15 to $1,615 and /YG for $33.20 per Dollar and that's $498 per contract there.  We had similar gains shorting the Dow off the 13,000 line (/YM in Futures) but the cool thing about that Dow is it hit that line over and over and over…
continue reading





Triple Top Tuesday – How Much Will it Cost to Break Higher?

$800Bn

That's the number we came up with yesterday for the minimum bailout/stimulus required to hold Dow 13,000, S&P 1,380, Nasdaq 2,950, NYSE 7,900 and Russell 790.  Buying a breakout over those levels will be even more expensive and, so far, we've gotten a grand total of ZERO actual commitments from the Central Banksters and other Government morons, most of whom are on vacation anyway.  

As you can see from our Big Chart, this is within our rule of thumb that it costs $10Bn to buy an S&P point and that effect lasts for about 6 months.  The S&P is up 105 points off the June lows and, so far, only China has committed stimulus Dollars (about $120Bn down with $400Bn still rumored), leaving a the gap to be filled by Europe, Japan and the US.  

Of course China has, by far, the biggest hole to fill.  In fact, Larry McDonald calls China's GDP "the new Libor," pointing out the pretty obvious fact that it makes no sense at all that Europe has negative growth while the US and Japan have minimal growth while China claims things are humming along at 8.5%.

Just this morning, Taiwan (China's neighbor) reported declining GDP, Korea reported their Industrial Production has gone negative and Singapore's Government Investment Corporation issued a report with a very gloomy outlook for the whole planet, stating:

"The developed economies will continue to be weighed down by an extended period of debt-deleveraging. In Europe, the debt crisis has spread beyond the periphery to the larger Spanish and Italian economies,  In the United States, the fragile economic recovery could be aborted by automatic spending cuts and tax increases if political gridlock continues beyond the 2012 elections with no compromise on a long-term plan for reducing the public deficit. Growth in the emerging economies, particularly China, is also slowing."

Judges at Germany's highest court may hold the future of Europe in their hands. Well, that sums it up quite nicely, doesn't it?  Meanwhile, everyone is looking for the ESM to save us but Germany hasn't even approved the fund yet – that matter is tied up in their Constitutional Court (pictured left) until September 12th and you can bet those judges are on vacation and not sitting in Draghi's kitchen, plotting to spring an early approval on us on Thursday – as seems to be expected by the MSM.  

Germany…
continue reading





Monday Market Movement – More Mario Momentum?

SPY DAILYSo, where's our stimulus?

Like good little Pavlovian dogs, we ran back into the markets last week when Mario Draghi rang the stimulus bill – increasing the $60Tn global markets by 5% – that's $3Tn of valuation added in 48 hours on the say-so of a former GS executive that has been put in charge of the European Central bank.  What could possibly go wrong with this scenario?  

If we can't trust the Investment Bankers who are taking over our Government, who can we trust?  So we'll assume that everything WILL be fixed this week and that the ECB, Fed, PBOC, BOE, BOJ and all the little Central Banksters will be pumping enough money into the system to justify a $3,000,000,000,000 increase in Global Equity prices – even though that means, at an average p/e of 15, that all this expected stimulus somehow drops an additional $200Bn to the bottom line of Big Business to justify the bump in valuation.

How many Dollars, Yen, Euros and Yuan do we have to give to Corporations to turn into $200Bn?  Well, if it's AMZN – the answer is $15Tn because it takes $50Bn in sales for AMZN to make $600M so figure 75x in sales to make 1x in earnings.  Why use AMZN?  Well because AMZN is almost 5% of the Nasdaq and it was their amazing run last week, on what rational people would consider poor earnings, that reversed the downtrend initiates by AAPL's (who are 15% of the Nasdaq) miss.  

AMZN WEEKLYI guess it's obvious why we're short AMZN (see Dave Fry's chart) but let's look at AAPL now, who are quite a bit more efficient at dropping Dollars to the bottom line.   Last year, AAPL took in $108Bn and made a profit of $26Bn – now THAT'S a good company!  So let's pretend that all companies are as good as AAPL and nowhere near as bad as AMZN at converting sales to profits.  

Now to get that additional $200Bn in Corporate Profits we only need about $800Bn in stimulus – assuming, of course, that money actually went to people who would spend it and not to Banksters who are still trying to back-fill multi-Trillion Dollar holes in their mark-to-fantasy balance sheets.  $800Bn is a doable number so let's pretend it is enough to justify a 5% bump in the market and now we know
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,




TGI Fed(s) – Promises, Promises

You made me promises promises

You knew you'd never keep

Promises promises

Why do I believe

All of your promises

You knew you'd never keep – Naked Eyes

Wow – what a party!  

The former Vice-Chairman of Goldman Sachs (Draghi) says everything is fixed and the global markets go flying – what's not to trust?  Would anyone form GS ever lie to us?  Would GS be involved in manipulating the Global Markets – of course not!  

Now that I've fulfilled my obligation to get my mother back unharmed – let's get real.  Draghi said the violent spike in bond yields in recent days was hampering "the functioning of the monetary policy transmission channels" – the EXACT expression used to justify each of the ECB's previous market interventions.  

Yields on Spanish two-year debt plunged 72 basis points to 5.47% in barely an hour, with comparable moves on Italian debt – easing the pressure before a string of debt auctions in Rome over coming days. The MIB index of stocks in Milan surged by 5.6%. Madrid's IBEX rose 6%, the biggest jump in two years, led by an explosive rise in bank shares.  Mr Draghi's comments came as Spain claimed backing from France and Germany for activation of the eurozone's rescue fund (EFSF) to buy Spanish bonds, though this would require calling the Bundestag's finance committee back from holiday for a vote. Action by the EFSF would provide "political cover" for the ECB to join the fray in a two-pronged attack.  "We're firing on all cylinders: that is what has ignited the markets," said Hans Redeker, currency chief at Morgan Stanley.

Joint statements from Madrid, Paris and Berlin said market turbulence "does not reflect the fundamentals of the Spanish economy, or the sustainability of its public debt".  According to Ambrose Pritchard, "the wording seems scripted to clear the way for intervention."  Of course, now it's time to put up or shut up as the Fed meets next week and the ECB has their pre-holiday meeting next week as well…
continue reading


Tags: , , , , ,




Thursday Flip-Flop – Whatever It Takes To Save the Euro

ECB President Mario Draghi said they "stand ready to do whatever it takes to save the Euro."

That was enough to send the Dow Futures flying up 200 points at 6am (where we shorted them at 12,800 along with S&P at 1,350, RUT at 780 and Oil at $90) because no one cared that he also said "within our mandate" nor do the bulls seem to realize that this is already year 3 of the ECB doing "whatever it takes" to save the Euro and, apparently, it takes a HELL OF A LOT MORE than what they've already done.  

We were silly, we should have flipped more bullish last night as Spain's 10-year yields hit 7.75% – new highs on Spain and Italy's 10-year have been pretty reliable BS triggers for more happy talk from the ECB, because "whatever it takes" is lying to investors and posturing and bluffing – WHATEVER IT TAKES to stop these rates from heading to double digits, which necessitated a $500Bn bailout for Greece and would mean TRILLIONS for Spain and EVEN MORE TRILLIONS for Italy.  

If you don't think there's a limit to "whatever it takes" – see how fast the EU comes up with one Trillion – let alone five it would take for Spain and Italy (as if it would stop there).  I have, sadly, seen hospitals do "whatever it takes" to keep terminal patients alive – they do a lot but, in the end, the patient still dies.  

Of course, our motto at PSW is "We don't care IF the markets are manipulated as long as we can figure out HOW the markets are manipulated and place our bets accordingly" so, early this morning, I put a note up for our Members, indicating how ridiculous the move was and indicating the shorting targets on the Futures.  Just yesterday, right in the morning post, I mentioned our shorting target for the Dow Futures (/YM) was 12,650 and we hit it 2 times after the open with 2 drops below 12,600 where we stopped out with $500 per contract gains.  Those are just the free ideas folks!  

Every quarter, during earnings month, we like to show off with a few free trade ideas to give non-Members a chance to have some fun.  We've been nailing it this month but July is almost over and so are…
continue reading


Tags: , , , ,




Wednesday – Stimulus Rumors Trump the APPLocalypse – For Now

AAPL missed!

Fortunately, we were well-prepared for this eventuality as I had said way back on July 10th, in Member Chat, that AAPL was "too big to succeed" (commentary also featured in Stock World Weekly on the 15th).  I also said, at the time regarding AAPL: "Where was my buy point – $555? That's a long way down to support if they fail $600."  We had called for taking the bullish AAPL money and running the previous Thursday (July 5th) in my morning Alert to Members, as they topped out that morning at about $610.  We were a bit early with that call (AAPL hit $619.87 the next week) but, on the whole, our bearish flip on AAPL (and the broader market) has served us well.  

In yesterday's Member Chat, we had one bearish earnings spread on AAPL as well as an aggressive play on SQQQ, the Nasdaq ultra-short, because we expected the Nasdaq to fail along with AAPL (and AMZN is next!) on their earnings.  Our SQQQ trade grabbed the Sept $50/60 bull call spread, offset by short puts on some stocks we are accumulating for our Income Portfolio for a net free trade but our dreams of a big pay-off on the spread will be put on hold today as a sudden burst of stimulus talk has turned the indexes back up, with the Dow now 200 points off the bottom in the Futures (7:50) at 12,660.  

SPY 5 MINUTEI already sent out an Alert to our Members this morning, pointing out what manipulated BS this was as the WSJ's Jon Hilsenrath issued what amounted to nothing more than some well-timed speculation on imminent Fed action into yesterday's close that has been picked up by the MSM as a fact and popped the Dow a full 100 points into yesterday's close – erasing 1/2 of a disastrous day in minutes (see Dave Fry's SPY chart).  At the moment (7:54), the Dow Futures (/YM) make an excellent short below the 12,650 line so excuse me while I hit "publish" on this partial post so our Members can see it.

Anyway, so where was I?  Oh yes, market manipulation by Uncle Rupert and the WSJ is not unexpected with NWS reorganizing and looking for good valuations on the company split.  I pointed out to Members seven other articles in which Hilsenrath has
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , ,




Tut Tut Tuesday – Still No Rain

Tut, tut, it does not look like rain.  

You would think the worst drought in 80 years would merit more than the occasional mention in the Financial media – I've seen CNBC do one-hour specials on the marijuana crops so you'd think actual FOOD would maybe make it a little higher on the list of concerns for the MSM – especially when we are experiencing the worst drought of the past 80 years and the last one that was this bad led to a Global Depression (along with, of course, National Debt Crises and Financial Failures but mission accomplished there already).

You would think the drought has somehow fallen into a Somebody Else's Problem Field, where individuals/populations of individuals choose to decentralize themselves from an issue that may be in critical need of recognition. Such issues may be of large concern to the population as a whole but can easily be a choice of ignorance at an individualistic level.  As Douglas Adams explains in The Hitchiker's Guide to the Galaxy:  

An SEP is something we can't see, or don't see, or our brain doesn't let us see, because we think that it's somebody else's problem…. The brain just edits it out, it's like a blind spot. If you look at it directly you won't see it unless you know precisely what it is. Your only hope is to catch it by surprise out of the corner of your eye.
The technology involved in making something properly invisible is so mind-bogglingly complex that 999,999,999 times out of a billion it's simpler just to take the thing away and do without it……. The "Somebody Else's Problem field" is much simpler, more effective, and "can be run for over a hundred years on a single torch battery.
This is because it relies on people's natural predisposition not to see anything they don't want to, weren't expecting, or can't explain.

Various areas of psychology and philosophy of perception are concerned with the reasons why individuals often ignore issues that are of relative or critical
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , ,




Monday Market Melt-Down – Spain Again?

Wheeeeee!  

How great is this?  We flipped bearish on Wednesday's poor Beige Book outlook (not to mention drought concerns and Hugh Hendry's warning that "Bad things are going to happen") and Thursday we noted it was looking a little too much like last July, where we fell off a cliff right after options expiration and my very appropriate comment at the end of Thursday morning's post was:  

Clack, clack, clack – like a roller coaster going up in the dark, we don't know when we'll get that big "wheeee" but we do know it's coming!  

Fortunately, we did not wait with our Long Put List going out in the Thursday Morning Alert to Members at 10:18, with all bearish trade ideas that included these gems:  

  • AMZN Oct $180 puts at $2.75, still $2.75 – even (all as of Friday's close) 
  • CMG Sept $350 puts at $5, now $35 – up 600% 
  • DIA Dec $117 puts at $2.50, now $2.80 – up 12%
  • ISRG Jan $350 puts at $1.70, now $5 – up 194%
  • MA Jan $290 puts at $2.85, now $3.40 – up 19%
  • SPY Oct $120 puts at $1, now $1.15 – up 15% 
  • V Jan $100 puts at $2, now $2.30 – up 15%  
  • XRT Jan $53 puts at $2, now $2.20 – up 10%

So a couple of big winners already and, of course, we're done with those (see Stock World Weekly for more trade ideas) and the way we work our Long Put List is to take those winners off the table and utilize our "fresh horses" for the next leg down.  Don't worry, we won't run out, there are 13 more picks on deck for our Members with AMZN (above) our top choice for this week (also featured with a slightly different trade in SWW).  

Even our aggressive oil puts should be doing well in our small portfolios as well as our bullish VXX trade and, of course, our EDZ and TZA hedges as China dropped 600 points this morning and the Russell is testing our 775 target already.  Things may be worse than we thought they were going to be as 775 may not hold on the RUT and that breakdown can lead us to test our -5% lines on the Russell (760), Nasdaq (2,850) and the…
continue reading


Tags: , , , , , , , ,




Friday’s Fabulous Rally Finish – All Downhill From Here?

SPY DAILYWheee, that was fun!

Let it not be said you did not have an opportunity to fill out those short positions (or cash in the longs) – we've been warning you all week so, when they say "Who could have seen this coming?" – you can say "Phil did."  QE where, I say as we are now supposed to wait for Jackson Hole, in August, for the Fed to act?  Come on – how many times are we going to fall for this BS?    

As noted here in David Fry's SPY chart – we're rallying on Tech, which is beating incredibly low expectations, and Energy, where the rising costs are back to hurting Global Consumers.  Ag stocks are also on fire and now we have a rice shortage to add to the corn shortage as India has it's weakest monsoon season since 2009 – so now we can add mass starvation to our list of macro concerns.  

This is how we built our rally in 2007 and that did not end very well.  As I said yesterday – it's deja vu all over again as we had a pointless, stupid, misguided rally last July and then we fell off a cliff – and that was before we even had a fiscal cliff to fall off of!  

As promised in yesterday's post, we initiated our Long Put List and it looks like we'll have our first triple already as our CMG Sept $350 puts were just $5 when we sent the Alert out to our Members at 10:18 yesterday morning and CMG disappointed on earnings last night and plunged below $350 in early trading.  Our other favorites were AMZN, MA, DIA, SPY and V and AMZN gave us very cheap entries as they topped out at $228, while V & MA trended down for us all day so we'll see if SPY can hold that magical 1,375 line (the early July high) and if the Dow can hold 12,950 or if we're just double-topping here ahead of the big drop.  

Dan Greenhaus: BTIG, Jim O'Neill: Goldman Sachs, Tom Porcelli: RBCWhile the charts have made some very constructive technical progress this week, the low volumes make the moves extremely suspect.  Note on the SPY chart that we had a run-up on declining volume in April (also earnings) as well – that did not lead to a pleasant May, did it?  More to the point,
continue reading





 

Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

"Hello PSW Members –

This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743"

Thank you for you time!

 
 

Zero Hedge

The Coming Slump

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by Alasdair Macleod via The Cobden Centre blog,

Governments and central banks have made little or no progress in recovering from the Lehman crisis six years ago. The problem is not helped by dependence on statistics which are downright misleading. This is particularly true of real GDP, comprised of nominal GDP deflated by an estimate of price inflation. First, we must discuss the inflation adjustment.

The idea that there is such a thing as a valid measure of price inflation is only true in an econometrician’s imagination. An index which might be theoretically valid at a single point in time is only subsequently valid ...



more from Tyler

Chart School

3 Things Worth Thinking About (Volume 2)

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Advisor Perspectives welcomes guest contributions. The views presented here do not necessarily represent those of Advisor Perspectives.

Last week, I started a new weekly series entitled "3 Things Worth Thinking About". The focus here will be three things, ironically enough, that are worth considering with respect to your portfolio and related investments. As I have discussed many times previously, focusing only on "bullish" commentary when markets are rising is really of little use as it creates a "blind spot" to related investment risks. The same goes for when markets are falling. These cognitive biases get in the way of making logical and disciplined investment decisions to not only garner returns when markets rise, but avoid depletion of capital when they don't.

I hope you will...



more from Chart School

Phil's Favorites

Driverless Cars on UK Public Streets Starting January; Transforming Personal Mobility; Taxi and Truck-Drivers Targeted

Courtesy of Mish.

The march for fully autonomous driverless cars marches on. In May, Google announced the Next Phase in Driverless Cars: No Steering Wheel or Brake Pedals. Google’s prototype for its new cars will limit them to a top speed of 25 miles per hour. The cars are intended for driving in urban and suburban settings, not on highways. The low speed will probably keep the cars out of more restrictive regulatory categories for vehicles, giving them more design flexibility.

Google is having 100 cars built by a manufacturer in the Detroit area, which it declined to name. Nor would it say how much the prototype vehicles cost. They will have a range of about 100 miles, powered by an electric motor that is roughly equivalen...



more from Ilene

All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: David is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

more from David

Option Review

Kellogg Call Options Active Ahead Of Earnings

Shares in packaged foods producer Kellogg Co. (Ticker: K) are in positive territory on Monday afternoon, trading up by roughly 0.20% at $65.48 as of 2:20 p.m. ET. Options volume on the stock is well above average levels today, with around 12,500 contracts traded on the name versus an average daily reading of around 1,700 contracts. Most of the volume is concentrated in September expiry calls, perhaps ahead of the company’s second-quarter earnings report set for release ahead of the opening bell on Thursday. Time and sales data suggests traders are snapping up calls at the Sep 67.5, 70.0 and 72.5 strikes. Volume is heaviest in the Sep 72.5 strike calls, with around 4,600 contracts traded against sizable open interest of approximately 11,800 contracts. It looks like traders paid an average premium of $0.37 per contrac...



more from Caitlin

Sabrient

Sector Detector: Bold bulls dare meek bears to take another crack

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Once again, stocks have shown some inkling of weakness. But every other time for almost three years running, the bears have failed to pile on and get a real correction in gear. Will this time be different? Bulls are almost daring them to try it, putting forth their best Dirty Harry impression: “Go ahead, make my day.” Despite weak or neutral charts and moderately bullish (at best) sector rankings, the trend is definitely on the side of the bulls, not to mention the bears’ neurotic skittishness about emerging into the sunlight.

In this weekly update, I give my view of the current market environment, offer a technical analysis of the S&P 500 chart, review our weekly fundamentals-based SectorCast rankings of the ten U.S. business sectors, and then offer up some actionable trading ideas, incl...



more from Sabrient

OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of July 28th, 2014

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



more from OpTrader

Stock World Weekly

Stock World Weekly

Newsletter writers are available to chat with Members regarding topics presented in SWW in the comments below each post. 

Our weekly newsletter Stock World Weekly is ready for your enjoyment.

Read about the week ahead, trade ideas from Phil, and more. Please click here and sign in with your PSW user name and password. Or take a free trial.

We appreciate your feedback--please let us know what you think in the comment section below.  

...

more from SWW

Digital Currencies

BitLicense Part 1 - Can Poorly Thought Out Regulation Drive the US Economy Back into the Dark Ages?

Courtesy of Reggie Middleton.

An Op-Ed piece penned by Veritaseum Chief Contracts Officer, Matt Bogosian

This past weekend (despite American Airlines' best efforts), Reggie and I made it to the Second Annual North American Bitcoin Conference in Chicago. While there were some very creative (and very ambitious) ideas on how to try to realize the disruptive Bitcoin protocol, one of the predominant topics of discussion was New York Superintendent of Financial Services Benjamin Lawsky's proposed Bitcoin regulations (the BitLicense proposal) - percieved by many participants at the event as an apparent ...



more from Bitcoin

Market Shadows

Danger: Falling Prices

Danger: Falling Prices

By Dr. Paul Price of Market Shadows

 

We tried holding up stock prices but couldn’t get the job done. Market Shadows’ Virtual Value Portfolio dipped by 2% during the week but still holds on to a market-beating 8.45% gain YTD. There was no escaping the downdraft after a major Portuguese bank failed. Of all the triggers for a large selloff, I’d guess the Portuguese bank failure was pretty far down most people's list of "things to worry about." 

All three major indices gave up some ground with the Nasdaq composite taking the hardest hi...



more from Paul

Pharmboy

Biotechs & Bubbles

Reminder: Pharmboy is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Well PSW Subscribers....I am still here, barely.  From my last post a few months ago to now, nothing has changed much, but there are a few bargins out there that as investors, should be put on the watch list (again) and if so desired....buy a small amount.

First, the media is on a tear against biotechs/pharma, ripping companies for their drug prices.  Gilead's HepC drug, Sovaldi, is priced at $84K for the 12-week treatment.  Pundits were screaming bloody murder that it was a total rip off, but when one investigates the other drugs out there, and the consequences of not taking Sovaldi vs. another drug combinations, then things become clearer.  For instance, Olysio (JNJ) is about $66,000 for a 12-week treatment, but is approved for fewer types of patients AND...



more from Pharmboy

Promotions

See Live Demo Of This Google-Like Trade Algorithm

I just wanted to be sure you saw this.  There’s a ‘live’ training webinar this Thursday, March 27th at Noon or 9:00 pm ET.

If GOOGLE, the NSA, and Steve Jobs all got together in a room with the task of building a tremendously accurate trading algorithm… it wouldn’t just be any ordinary system… it’d be the greatest trading algorithm in the world.

Well, I hate to break it to you though… they never got around to building it, but my friends at Market Tamer did.

Follow this link to register for their training webinar where they’ll demonstrate the tested and proven Algorithm powered by the same technological principles that have made GOOGLE the #1 search engine on the planet!

And get this…had you done nothing b...



more from Promotions



FeedTheBull - Top Stock market and Finance Sites



About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

Learn more About Phil >>


As Seen On:




About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

Market Shadows >>