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Archive for the ‘Chart School’ Category

Daily Market Commentary: Light Losses in Indices

Courtesy of Declan.

Charts are turning into a scatter plot of doji. Today’s losses didn’t violate support and trading volume was light. Little to worry about here.

The Russell 2000 took the largest loss, but it’s secure above its 50-day MA. The index is trading within a rising channel with a number of support levels, including the 50-day MA, to look too.

The S&P is holding above 1,987 support and technicals are in good shape. Today’s action is a chance for bulls to add or initiate a position. Stops go a close below 1,987.

The Nasdaq has room to give up a little more before it comes back to support. Technicals are also in good shape too.

The semiconductor index managed to finish with a gain as it held yesterday’s lows on early weakness.  This is also good news for the Nasdaq and Nasdaq 100.

For Friday, look for further upside from the semiconductor index. Near term traders can look to the S&P which may find love at 1,987. No short candidates.

Accepting KIVA gift certificates to help support the work on this blog. All certificates gifted are converted into loans for those who need the help more.





S&P 500 Snapshot: Rally Pauses with a Close below 2000

Courtesy of Doug Short.

New Jobless Claims were a tad better than expected and the Second Estimate of Q2 GDP was revised upward. Perhaps the market was more focused on global tensions or the forthcoming a three-day weekend. The S&P 500 opened lower and immediately dropped to its -0.48% intraday low. A partial recovery stalled during the lunch hour, and the index spent the rest of the day struggling around the 1998 level, two points below its Wednesday battleground. Its modest closing loss of 0.17% snapped a three-day rally that included two record closes.

Will the S&P 500 move back above 2000 prior to the extended Labor Day weekend? Stay tuned!

The yield on the 10-year Note closed at 2.34%, down 3 bps from yesterday’s close and matching the lowest YTD close on August 15th. The yield on the 30-year Bond, which closed at 3.08%, is its lowest close since May of last year.

Here is a 15-minute chart of the past five sessions.

Trading volume was the second lowest of 2014 — slightly higher than the 1 PM close on July 3rd.

For a longer-term perspective, here is a pair of charts based on daily closes starting with the all-time high prior to the Great Recession.

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The BEA’s Q2 GDP Second Estimate: A Deeper Analysis

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Note from dshort: Here is the always-fascinating analysis of the BEA’s latest GDP report from the Consumer Metrics Institute.


In their second estimate of the US GDP for the second quarter of 2014, the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) reported that the economy was growing at a +4.18% annualized rate, up about a quarter of a percent from their previous estimate. When compared to the prior quarter, the new measurement is now up about 6.3% from a -2.11% contraction rate for the 1st quarter of 2014. This is the largest positive quarter to quarter improvement in GDP growth in 14 years.

The largest positive revisions to the growth contributions during the 2nd quarter growth were in commercial fixed investments (+0.34%), imports (+0.11%), exports (+0.08%) and consumer expenditures for services (+0.09%). The increase in consumer services spending was mostly offset by reduced spending for consumer goods (-0.08%), and the improved fixed investment was partially offset by reduced inventory building (-0.27%). The “real final sales of domestic product” growth improved by about a half percent to +2.79%

Real annualized per-capita disposable income was reported to be $37,481 — up $32 per year from the previous estimate, but still down $388 from the 4th quarter of 2012. As mentioned last month, a significant portion of that increased disposable income went into savings, with the savings rate holding at 5.3% — the highest savings level since 4Q-2012.

For this report the BEA effectively assumed annualized quarterly inflation of 2.15%. During the second quarter (i.e., from April through June) the growth rate of the seasonally adjusted CPI-U index published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) was over one and a third percent higher at a 3.53% (annualized) rate, and the price index reported by the Billion Prices Project (BPP — which arguably reflected the real experiences of American households) was over a half of a percent higher at 2.72%. Under reported inflation will result in overly optimistic growth data, and if the BEA’s numbers were corrected for inflation using the BLS CPI-U the economy would be reported to be growing at a 2.89% annualized rate. If we were to use the BPP data to adjust for inflation, the quarter’s growth rate would have been 3.70%.

Among the notable items in the report:

  • The headline contribution of consumer expenditures for goods was


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Visualizing GDP: A Look Inside the Q2 Second Estimate

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Note from dshort: The charts in this commentary have been updated to include the Q2 2014 Second Estimate.


The chart below is my way to visualize real GDP change since 2007. I’ve used a stacked column chart to segment the four major components of GDP with a dashed line overlay to show the sum of the four, which is real GDP itself. Here is the latest overview from the Bureau of Labor Statistics:

The increase in real GDP in the second quarter primarily reflected positive contributions from personal consumption expenditures (PCE), private inventory investment, exports, nonresidential fixed investment, state and local government spending, and residential fixed investment. Imports, which are a subtraction in the calculation of GDP, increased.

Let’s take a closer look at the contributions of GDP of the four major subcomponents. My data source for this chart is the Excel file accompanying the BEA’s latest GDP news release (see the links in the right column). Specifically, I used Table 2: Contributions to Percent Change in Real Gross Domestic Product.

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Note: The conventional practice is to round GDP to one decimal place, the latest at 4.2. The 4.17 GDP in the chart above is the real GDP calculated to two decimal places based on the BEA chained 2009 dollar data series.


Over the time frame of this chart, the Personal Consumption Expenditures (PCE) component has shown the most consistent correlation with real GDP itself. When PCE has been positive, GDP has usually been positive, and vice versa. In the latest GDP data, the contribution of PCE came at 1.69 of the 4.17 real GDP. The Q2 contribution from PCE increased substantially from the previous quarter.

The latest GDP numbers support the general view that the unusually severe winter was the transitory cause of the Q1 GDP contraction rather than fundamental business cycle weakness.

Here is a look at the contribution changes between over the past four quarters. The difference between the two rightmost columns was addressed in the GDP summary quoted above. I’ve added arrows to highlight the quarter-over-quarter change for the major components.…
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3 Things Worth Thinking About (Volume 6)

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Advisor Perspectives welcomes guest contributions. The views presented here do not necessarily represent those of Advisor Perspectives.


The Missing Ingredient

I have been in the “money game” for a long time starting with a bank just prior to the crash of 1987. I make this point only to say that I have seen several full market cycles in my life, and my perspectives are based on experience rather than theory.

In 1999, there was a media personality who berated investors for paying fees to investment advisors/stock brokers when it was clear that ETF’s were the only way to go. His mantra was “why pay someone to underperform the indexes?” After the subsequent crash, he was no longer on the air.

By the time the markets began to soar in 2007, there was a whole universe of ETF’s from which to choose. Once again, the mainstream media pounced on indexing and that “buy and hold” strategies were the only logical way for individuals to invest. Why pay someone to underperform the indexes when they are rising. Then came the crash in 2008.

Today, we are once again becoming inundated with articles bashing financial advisors, money managers, etc. for underperforming the major indexes during the Fed induced market surge. It is once again becoming “apparent” that individuals should only be using low-cost indexing strategies and holding for the “long term.” Of course, the next crash hasn’t happened yet.

My point here is this. There is a “cost” to chasing “low costs.” I do not disagree that costs are an important component of long-term returns; however there are two missing ingredients to all of these articles promoting “buy and hold” index investing: 1) time; and, 2) psychology.

As I have discussed previously, the most important commodity to all investors is “time.” It is the one thing we can not manufacture more of. Individuals that experienced either one, or both, of the last two bear markets now understand the importance of “time” relating to their investment goals. Individuals that were close to retirement in either 2000, or 2007, and failed to navigate the subsequent market drawdowns have had to post-pone their retirement plans, potentially indefinitely. While the media cheers the rise of the markets to new all-time highs, the reality is that most investors have still not financially recovered due to the second point of…
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Real GDP Per Capita Rises to 3.49%

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Earlier today we learned that the Second Estimate for Q2 2014 real GDP came in at 4.17 percent (rounded to 4.2 percent), an upward revision from 4.0 percent in the Advance Estimate. Real GDP per capita was somewhat lower at 3.49 percent.

Here is a chart of real GDP per capita growth since 1960. For this analysis I’ve chained in today’s dollar for the inflation adjustment. The per-capita calculation is based on quarterly aggregates of mid-month population estimates by the Bureau of Economic Analysis, which date from 1959 (hence my 1960 starting date for this chart, even though quarterly GDP has is available since 1947). The population data is available in the FRED series POPTHM. The logarithmic vertical axis ensures that the highlighted contractions have the same relative scale.

I’ve drawn an exponential regression through the data using the Excel GROWTH function to give us a sense of the historical trend. The regression illustrates the fact that the trend since the Great Recession has a visibly lower slope than long-term trend. In fact, the current GDP per-capita is 9.8% below the pre-recession trend but fractionally higher than the 10.1% below trend in Q1.

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The real per-capita series gives us a better understanding of the depth and duration of GDP contractions. As we can see, since our 1960 starting point, the recession that began in December 2007 is associated with a deeper trough than previous contractions, which perhaps justifies its nickname as the Great Recession.

Quarterly GDP Compounded Annual Rate of Change

The standard measure of GDP in the US is expressed as the compounded annual rate of change from one quarter to the next. The current real GDP is 4.2 percent (rounded from 4.17 percent). But with a per-capita adjustment, the data series is currently at 3.49 percent. Both a 10-year moving average and the slope of a linear regression through the data show that the US economic growth has been slowing for decades.

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How do the two compare, GDP and GDP per capita? Here is an overlay of the two in the…
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How Long to the Next Recession? iM’s Weekly Update

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Advisor Perspectives welcomes guest contributions. The views presented here do not necessarily represent those of Advisor Perspectives.


The BCI at 177.0 is up from last week’s upward revised 176.5. However, the BCIg, the smoothed annualized growth of BCI, at 17.9 is down from last week’s upward revised 18.2. However, BCI does not indicate a possible recession in the near future.

Figure 1 plots BCIp, BCI, BCIg and the S&P500 together with the thresholds (red lines) that need to be crossed to be able to call a recession. Figure 2 plots the history of BCI, BCIg, and the LOG(S&P500) since July 1967, i.e. the last 44 years which include seven recessions, each which the BCI managed to indicate timely.


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The off-peak indicator BCIp is at 100.0 and at this level the BCIw graphic with the tracks to recession is not applicable.

The BCI, BCIp and BCIw are described in article 1, article 2 and article 3 respectively. Historic values of BCI, BCIg and BCIp can be downloaded from the author’s website.

Apart from the weekly Business Cycle Index, updates of a number of weekly and monthly financial macro models are also available on the website.


Anton Vrba and Georg Vrba
iM imarketsignals.com

Anton Vrba is an electrical engineer. He pursued a career in R&D, manufacturing and construction project management. He developed the iMarketSignals’ proprietary Business Cycle Index (BCI) and the authors’ website. His other interests are mathematics and physics. He is a lateral thinker and has many ideas that challenge the established and accepted explanations.

Georg Vrba is a professional engineer who has been a consulting engineer for many years. In his opinion, mathematical models provide better guidance to market direction than financial “experts.” He has developed financial models for the stock market, the bond market, yield curve, gold, silver and recession prediction, all published in Advisor Perspectives. The models are updated weekly at http://imarketsignals.com/.





Q2 GDP Rises to 4.2% in the Second Estimate

Courtesy of Doug Short.

The Second Estimate for Q2 GDP, to one decimal, came in at 4.2 percent, an upward revision from the Advance Estimate of 4.0 percent. The GDP deflator used to calculate real (inflation-adjusted) GDP rose to 2.2 percent, an upward revision from the Advance Estimate of 2.0 percent. Investing.com had forecast a downward revision to 3.9 percent for today’s GDP estimate and the deflator to remain unchanged at 2.0 percent.

Here is an excerpt from the Bureau of Economic Analysis news release:

Real gross domestic product — the output of goods and services produced by labor and property located in the United States — increased at an annual rate of 4.2 percent in the second quarter of 2014, according to the “second” estimate released by the Bureau of Economic Analysis. In the first quarter, real GDP decreased 2.1 percent.

The GDP estimate released today is based on more complete source data than were available for the “advance” estimate issued last month. In the advance estimate, the increase in real GDP was 4.0 percent. With this second estimate for the second quarter, the general picture of economic growth remains the same; the increase in nonresidential fixed investment was larger than previously estimated, while the increase in private inventory investment was smaller than previously estimated (see “Revisions” on page 3).

The increase in real GDP in the second quarter primarily reflected positive contributions from personal consumption expenditures (PCE), private inventory investment, exports, nonresidential fixed investment, state and local government spending, and residential fixed investment. Imports, which are a subtraction in the calculation of GDP, increased. [Full Release]

Here is a look at GDP since Q2 1947 together with the real (inflation-adjusted) S&P Composite. The start date is when the BEA began reporting GDP on a quarterly basis. Prior to 1947, GDP was reported annually. To be more precise, what the lower half of the chart shows is the percent change from the preceding period in Real (inflation-adjusted) Gross Domestic Product. I’ve also included recessions, which are determined by the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER).

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Here is a close-up of GDP alone with a line to illustrate the 3.3 average (arithmetic mean) for the…
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New Jobless Claims at 298K, A Bit Better Than Expected

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Here is the opening statement from the Department of Labor:

In the week ending August 23, the advance figure for seasonally adjusted initial claims was 298,000, a decrease of 1,000 from the previous week’s revised level. The previous week’s level was revised up by 1,000 from 298,000 to 299,000. The 4-week moving average was 299,750, a decrease of 1,250 from the previous week’s revised average. The previous week’s average was revised up by 250 from 300,750 to 301,000.

There were no special factors impacting this week’s initial claims. [See full report]

Today’s seasonally adjusted number at 298K was slightly below the Investing.com forecast of 300K. The 4-week moving average is 6,000 above its post-recession low set three weeks ago.

Here is a close look at the data over the past few years (with a callout for the past year), which gives a clearer sense of the overall trend in relation to the last recession and the volatility in recent months.

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As we can see, there’s a good bit of volatility in this indicator, which is why the 4-week moving average (the highlighted number) is a more useful number than the weekly data. Here is the complete data series.

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Occasionally I see articles critical of seasonal adjustment, especially when the non-adjusted number better suits the author’s bias. But a comparison of these two charts clearly shows extreme volatility of the non-adjusted data, and the 4-week MA gives an indication of the recurring pattern of seasonal change in the second chart (note, for example, those regular January spikes).

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Because of the extreme volatility of the non-adjusted weekly data, a 52-week moving average gives a better sense of the secular trends. I’ve added a linear regression through the data. We can see that this metric continued to fall below the long-term trend stretching back to 1968.


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The "Real" Goods on the Today’s Durable Goods Data

Courtesy of Doug Short.

Earlier today I posted an update on the July Advance Report on July Durable Goods New Orders. This Census Bureau series dates from 1992 and is not adjusted for either population growth or inflation.


Special note: This month, before doing my usual update, I want to put today’s historic surge in the Durable Goods headline number in context. As the financial press has explained, the big jump was the result of international airplane orders. For a clear understanding of how big and how unprecedented the rise, let’s look at the month-over-month change in this subcomponent.

Let’s now review Durable Goods data with two adjustments. In the charts below the red line shows the goods orders divided by the Census Bureau’s monthly population data, giving us durable goods orders per capita. The blue line goes a step further and adjusts for inflation based on the Producer Price Index for All Commodities, chained in today’s dollar value. This gives us the “real” durable goods orders per capita and thus a more accurate historical context in which to evaluate the conventional reports on the nominal monthly data.

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Economists frequently study this indicator excluding Transportation or Defense or both. Just how big are these two subcomponents? Here is a stacked area chart to illustrate the relative sizes over time based on the nominal data.

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Here is the first chart, repeated this time ex Transportation, the series usually referred to as “core” durable goods.

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Now we’ll leave Transportation in the series and exclude Defense orders.

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And now we’ll exclude both Transportation and Defense for a better look at a more concentrated “core” durable goods orders.

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Here is the chart that I believe gives the most accurate view of what Consumer…
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Help One Of Our Own PSW Members

"Hello PSW Members –

This is a non-trading topic, but I wanted to post it during trading hours so as many eyes can see it as possible.  Feel free to contact me directly at jennifersurovy@yahoo.com with any questions.

Last fall there was some discussion on the PSW board regarding setting up a YouCaring donation page for a PSW member, Shadowfax. Since then, we have been looking into ways to help get him additional medical services and to pay down his medical debts.  After following those leads, we are ready to move ahead with the YouCaring site. (Link is posted below.)  Any help you can give will be greatly appreciated; not only to help aid in his medical bill debt, but to also show what a great community this group is.

http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/help-get-shadowfax-out-from-the-darkness-of-medical-bills-/126743

Thank you for you time!

 
 

Zero Hedge

A World Without Fractional Reserve Banks And Central Planning

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Submitted by John Rubino via The Dollar Collapse blog,

Excerpted From The Money Bubble: What To Do Before It Pops by James Turk and John Rubino:

In a very real sense, it is fractional reserve banking and not money itself that is the root of so many of today’s evils....



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Phil's Favorites

Pump And Dump VC Style: Kleiner Perkins' Gambit To Shear The IPO Sheep

Courtesy of David Stockman via Contra Corner

That was quick! Last November Snapchat was valued at $2 billion in the private VC market; by Q1 that had risen to $7 billion; and yesterday it soared to $10 billion. Gaining $8 billion in market value in just nine months is quite a feat under any circumstance - but that’s especially notable if you’re are a company with no profits, no revenues and no business model.

And, yes, that’s not to mention the “product” either. Apparently, Snapchat’s 100 million teenage and college users mostly swap pics of their private parts which vanish after 15 seconds - or so they think. In that respect, Snapchat’s business challenge may not be lack of “demand”, but whether its exhibitionist “customers&rd...



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Chart School

Daily Market Commentary: Light Losses in Indices

Courtesy of Declan.

Charts are turning into a scatter plot of doji. Today's losses didn't violate support and trading volume was light. Little to worry about here.

The Russell 2000 took the largest loss, but it's secure above its 50-day MA. The index is trading within a rising channel with a number of support levels, including the 50-day MA, to look too.

The S&P is holding above 1,987 support and technicals are in good shape. Today's action is a chance for bulls to add or initiate a position. Stops go a close below 1,987.

...



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Option Review

Puts Active On Buffalo Wild Wings

Buffalo Wild Wings Inc. (Ticker: BWLD) shares are in positive territory in early-afternoon trading on Thursday, reversing earlier losses to stand up 0.50% on the session at $148.50 as of 12:15 pm ET. Options volume on the restaurant chain is running approximately three times the daily average level due to heavy put activity in the October expiry contracts. It looks like one or more traders are buying the Oct 140/145 put spread at a net premium of roughly $1.45 per contract. As of the time of this writing, the spread has traded approximately 3,000 times against very little open interest at either striking price. The put spread may be a hedge to protect a long stock position against a roughly 6% pullback in the price of the underlying through October expiration, or an outright bearish play anticipating a dip in BWLD shares in the next couple of months. The spread makes money at expiration if shares in BWLD decline 3.3% from the current price of $148.50 to breach the breakeven point...



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All About Trends

Mid-Day Update

Reminder: David is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Click here for the full report.




To learn more, sign up for David's free newsletter and receive the free report from All About Trends - "How To Outperform 90% Of Wall Street With Just $500 A Week." Tell David PSW sent you. - Ilene...

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Sabrient

Six Companies Push Tax Rules Most

Reminder: Sabrient is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Courtesy of Sabrient Systems and Gradient Analytics

Gradient Senior Analyst Nicholas Yee reports on six companies that are using a variety of techniques to shift pretax profits to lower-tax areas. Featured in this USA Today, article, the companies include CELG, ALTR, VMW, NVDA, LRCX, and SNPS.

Six Companies Push Tax Rules Most

Excerpt:

Nobody likes to pay taxes. But some companies are taking cutting their tax bil...



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Insider Scoop

Markets Open Lower; Dollar General Profit Matches Street View

Courtesy of Benzinga.

Related BZSUM #PreMarket Primer: Thursday, August 28: Russia Implicated Further In Ukrainian Conflict Markets Edge Lower; Tiffany Profit Beats Estimates

Following the market opening Thursday, the Dow traded down 0.36 percent to 17,060.69 while the NASDAQ declined 0.29 percent to 4,556.18. The S&P also fell, ...



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Digital Currencies

Disgraced Mt Gox CEO Goes For Second Try With Web-Hosting Service (And No, Bitcoin Not Accepted)

Courtesy of ZeroHedge. View original post here.

Submitted by Tyler Durden.

Mt Gox may be long gone in the annals of bankruptcy, but its founder refuses to go gentle into that insolvent night. And, as CoinDesk reports, the disgraced former CEO of the one-time premier bitcoin trading platform has decided to give it a second try by launching new web hosting service called Forever.net and is registered under both Karpeles’ name and that of Tibanne, the parent company of Mt Gox.

From the company profile:

“TIBANNE Co.Ltd. ...



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OpTrader

Swing trading portfolio - week of August 25th, 2014

Reminder: OpTrader is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

 

This post is for all our live virtual trade ideas and daily comments. Please click on "comments" below to follow our live discussion. All of our current  trades are listed in the spreadsheet below, with entry price (1/2 in and All in), and exit prices (1/3 out, 2/3 out, and All out).

We also indicate our stop, which is most of the time the "5 day moving average". All trades, unless indicated, are front-month ATM options. 

Please feel free to participate in the discussion and ask any questions you might have about this virtual portfolio, by clicking on the "comments" link right below.

To learn more about the swing trading virtual portfolio (strategy, performance, FAQ, etc.), please click here ...



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Stock World Weekly

Stock World Weekly

Newsletter writers are available to chat with Members regarding topics presented in SWW, comments are found below each post.

The latest issue of our weekly newsletter is available now. Click on Stock World Weekly and sign in with your user name and password. (Or take a free trial!)

#120692880 / gettyimages.com

 

...

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Market Shadows

Helen Davis Chaitman Reviews In Bed with Wall Street.

Author Helen Davis Chaitman is a nationally recognized litigator with a diverse trial practice in the areas of lender liability, bankruptcy, bank fraud, RICO, professional malpractice, trusts and estates, and white collar defense. In 1995, Ms. Chaitman was named one of the nation's top ten litigators by the National Law Journal for a jury verdict she obtained in an accountants' malpractice case. Ms. Chaitman is the author of The Law of Lender Liability (Warren, Gorham & Lamont 1990)... Since early 2009, Ms. Chaitman has been an outspoken advocate for investors in Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities LLC (more here).

Helen Davis Chaitman Reviews In Bed with Wall Street. 

By Helen Davis Chaitman   

I confess: Larry D...



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Pharmboy

Biotechs & Bubbles

Reminder: Pharmboy is available to chat with Members, comments are found below each post.

Well PSW Subscribers....I am still here, barely.  From my last post a few months ago to now, nothing has changed much, but there are a few bargins out there that as investors, should be put on the watch list (again) and if so desired....buy a small amount.

First, the media is on a tear against biotechs/pharma, ripping companies for their drug prices.  Gilead's HepC drug, Sovaldi, is priced at $84K for the 12-week treatment.  Pundits were screaming bloody murder that it was a total rip off, but when one investigates the other drugs out there, and the consequences of not taking Sovaldi vs. another drug combinations, then things become clearer.  For instance, Olysio (JNJ) is about $66,000 for a 12-week treatment, but is approved for fewer types of patients AND...



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Promotions

See Live Demo Of This Google-Like Trade Algorithm

I just wanted to be sure you saw this.  There’s a ‘live’ training webinar this Thursday, March 27th at Noon or 9:00 pm ET.

If GOOGLE, the NSA, and Steve Jobs all got together in a room with the task of building a tremendously accurate trading algorithm… it wouldn’t just be any ordinary system… it’d be the greatest trading algorithm in the world.

Well, I hate to break it to you though… they never got around to building it, but my friends at Market Tamer did.

Follow this link to register for their training webinar where they’ll demonstrate the tested and proven Algorithm powered by the same technological principles that have made GOOGLE the #1 search engine on the planet!

And get this…had you done nothing b...



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About Phil:

Philip R. Davis is a founder Phil's Stock World, a stock and options trading site that teaches the art of options trading to newcomers and devises advanced strategies for expert traders...

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About Ilene:

Ilene is editor and affiliate program coordinator for PSW. She manages the site market shadows, archives, more. Contact Ilene to learn about our affiliate and content sharing programs.

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